AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


AcuteCare Telemedicine on the Forefront of Telestroke Care
January 28, 2016, 9:30 am
Filed under: Telemedicine

The year 2015 was a watershed year for the advancement of telehealth services and virtual healthcare all across the country. As rapidly increasing numbers of patients and providers alike warm up to the use and benefits of new communication technologies for the treatment of everything from chronic diseases to routine visits with general practitioners, one Atlanta-based company has become the leader in virtual stroke care.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) has been on the forefront of the use of telecommunication technology for years, remotely delivering live and interactive Telestroke and other Teleneurology solutions anytime, anywhere to hospitals and emergency medical centers throughout the Southeast. Last year ACT significantly expanded its telemedicine partnerships in small to mid-sized hospitals as well as enterprise level hospitals in Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia.

In addition to providing patients with the most advanced neurological care regardless of their proximity to major medical centers, Telehealth is playing a key role in saving rural hospitals from closing their doors. To date, 51 rural hospitals have closed in the US since 2010, according to the North Carolina Rural Health Research Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Southern states have been disproportionately affected by the increase in closing of rural facilities. Dr. James Kiely, Partner, ACT, says, “AcuteCare Telemedicine was created to impact the well-being of patients with severe neurological emergencies who otherwise wouldn’t have rapid access to vital expertise simply because of where they live.”

“The advancements in teleneurology not only allow us to access more patients in need of our specialized care, but improve patient outcomes overall,” says Dr. Keith Sanders, ACT Partner. “ACT’s expanding list of collaborations with partner hospitals will have a significant impact on the patients and the communities they serve.”

A new study published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases  indicates a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network. “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” is authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS.

As virtual health initiatives continue to move forward, new and valuable trends and telehealth technology solutions emerge, the traditional methods of delivering medical care are challenged and disrupted at medical facilities, physicians’ offices and hospitals.

Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT comments, “In-person visits will likely remain the mainstay for local care for those fortunate enough to be around many physicians, but when minutes count in emergencies experts can step in and make the decisions that will determine a lifetime of health instead of a lifetime of disability. Telemedicine isn’t a fad but rather a disruptive innovation that flows naturally out of technological advances and has already contributed immensely to our society’s health. It’s a perfect fit for our shrinking resources.”



AcuteCare Telemedicine Team of Neurological Specialists Publish New Study

A new study published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases indicates a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network. “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” is authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) has remained committed to working with healthcare organizations to establish telestroke programs that not only improve access to specialty care but also significantly improve patient outcomes,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “It is critical to prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable.”

As stated in the background for this study, telestroke must demonstrate successful outcomes to achieve sustained growth and acceptance. Asserting that telemedicine is faster, employs the latest technology, or promotes a better use of limited re-sources is laudable but insufficient. An analysis of stroke treatment within a telemedicine network in 2013 showed that tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) could be safely and reliably administered within a practice-based model of telestroke care. Since then, hospital volume and tPA administration within this network have tripled. We hypothesize that a practice-based model of telestroke can maintain positive outcomes in the face of rapid growth. As a result, the study demonstrates meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network.

“Success in our business isn’t just about adding new healthcare organizations to our client portfolio,’ says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT. “As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care and improving patient outcomes.  This study is representative of our ongoing commitment to serve as a leader in telestroke care, establishing a standard of care and a model that supports the positive growth of telestroke programs across the country.”

Download the full article here.

 About AcuteCare Telemedicine

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.



Robots and Doctors Help Improve Stroke Treatment

The issue of delivering consistent medical care across all geographic areas from large populated urban centers to the outlying rural communities has been a critical area of focus for healthcare organizations. Typically smaller, financially stressed rural hospitals and clinics suffer from limited access to medical specialists, particularly in emergency situations involving stroke and other neurological and coronary events. These medical emergencies demanded quick and immediate treatment to save the affected patient from significant disability or death.

In the three years since the first telestroke robot was installed at Covenant Health Hospitals in East Tennessee, doctors at LeConte Medical Center (LMC) have used the technology on a weekly basis. Using the latest in virtual presence technology the dedicated medical professionals at LMC can connect immediately with a team of neurological specialists at AcuteCare Telemedicine in Atlanta, GA. “It’s an amazing thing that we have this expertise in a small rural hospital,” said Steve Dronen, M.D., Emergency Room at LeConte Medical Center. While the hospital has a well demonstrated history of providing quality care to stroke patients, the extra advantage of having highly trained and experienced neurological specialist available for consultation around the clock, 24/7 assures LMC patients the highest level of stroke care available anywhere in the country.

Dr. James Kiely, a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C. and AcuteCare Telemedicine said, “As Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta I was aware of how fortunate our patients were to have the most immediate lifesaving treatment for stroke 24 hours a day, seven days a week.” The most effective stroke care requires that it be delivered to the patient within the “golden window” of stroke onset. With stroke being the number four cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States, lack of access to neurologists who specialize in stroke care threatens to deprive many patients the best chance of recovery after a stroke. “AcuteCare Telemedicine was created”, Dr. Kiely says, “to impact the well-being of patients with severe neurological emergencies who otherwise wouldn’t have rapid access to vital expertise simply because of where they live.”

The other major benefit of the technology, described by Dr. S. Arthur Moore, Medical Director of Stroke Program at Covenant Health’s Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center, is how quickly the tele-robot allows doctors to make life-saving decisions. “We can now do something about it. It doesn’t matter if you are in rural East Tennessee or in Knoxville, we can provide the same care,” said Dr. Moore. Doctors only have a small window of time to make a treatment decision before the damage from stroke becomes permanent. The new technology is helping to accelerate the treatment process.



Telehealth Can Play a Key Role in Saving Rural Hospitals

No matter the location, rural communities across America have one thing in common. Residents tend to be older and sicker than their fellow, “urbanites”. The introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), designed to provide millions of previously uninsured or underinsured patients access to health insurance, accompanied by Medicare reimbursement cuts and other regulations is beginning to negatively impact rural hospitals. The trend has many pondering; “If you decide to live in a rural community, are you deciding to have a worse outcome if you have a stroke?” asked Dr. Jeff Feit, vice president of population health at the Valley Health system.

To date, 51 rural hospitals have closed in the US since 2010, according to the North Carolina Rural Health Research Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Southern states have been disproportionately affected by the increase in closing of rural facilities. Texas has seen 10 rural hospitals close, while Alabama and Georgia have each lost five just in the past five years. The National Rural Health Association has identified 283 more rural hospitals in danger of going out of business. Many rural hospitals “have been struggling on the cusp for a long time,” said Mark Holmes, director of the North Carolina Rural Health Research Program. The future of many rural hospitals is threatened by the ongoing cuts to Medicare and the failure of more than 20 states to expand Medicaid.

Maggie Elehwany, vice president of government affairs for the National Rural Health Association, says significant Medicaid cuts in the past few years have been suffocating rural hospitals. “The greatest crisis right now is the hospital closure issue,” she said. In Kansas, The Kansas Hospital Association has repeatedly told its lawmakers that failure to expand Medicaid will have dire consequences, leading some rural hospitals to shut down. Terry Hill, a senior policy adviser at the National Rural Health Resource Center has predicted, “You’re going to see a predominance of closures in the next year or so in those states that have not expanded their Medicaid eligibility.” Congress is attempting to respond to the crisis by initiating several bills to help rural hospitals recover, but they are receiving little attention by the majority of lawmakers.

In the interim, an increasing number of rural hospitals are looking to virtual healthcare options to remain financially viable and operationally relevant in a new, emerging healthcare delivery model. Telemedicine can provide many of them the means for resuscitating a community’s hospital by connecting rural patients to primary care and medical specialists as well as remote monitoring of many chronic diseases.

Establishing virtual healthcare solutions requires investment, but the investment will pay significant dividends for patients, providers and hospitals by creating broader access to healthcare networks, experts and outlying resources. While some small hospitals are debating whether they can afford to implement telemedicine, others are debating if the hospital can afford not to make the investment.



The 21st Annual ATA Telemedicine Meeting & Exposition

The American Telemedicine Association (ATA), the leading international resource and advocate promoting the use of advanced remote medical technologies, announces the dates for its annual meeting and exposition for 2016. For 20 years, the ATA has focused fully on telemedicine solutions to transform healthcare systems. The results of the ATA’s efforts have generated significant impact for overall quality of care, equity and healthcare affordability.

The 2016 American Telemedicine Association Meeting and Exposition is expected to host as many as 6,000 thousand attendees at the Minneapolis Convention Center in Minneapolis, MN. The four day event will get underway on May 14 and conclude on May 17, 2016. ATA 2016 is the largest trade show in the world for healthcare professionals and entrepreneurs in the telemedicine, telehealth and mHealth space. The event will showcase a wide range of educational seminars, speakers and products and services related to telemedicine industry from over 300 exhibitors.

“AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) looks forward to participating at the event in 2016,” comments Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT. “We applaud the efforts of the ATA in advancing telemedicine opportunities and providing a platform for practitioners to share insights, research, and best practices.”

Established in 1993, The American Telemedicine Association is a non-profit association of individuals, healthcare institutions, companies and other organizations with an interest in promoting professional, ethical and equitable improvement in health care delivery through telecommunications and information technology.

For more information on the event, click here.

ATA Trade Show



Is Telemedicine and Telehealth the Future of Healthcare Delivery?

With the global telemedicine market predicted to soar past the $30 billion mark by 2020 it is becoming increasingly difficult to overestimate the impact telemedicine, or it’s broader application telehealth, is about to have on the broader healthcare delivery model. Much of the considerable focus of discussions thus far has been about the effects of virtual technology on the safety and quality of service to patients, the creation of new methods of payment for virtual services rendered and massaging the concerns of the industries evaluators and licensors. But the ongoing advance of mobility and affordability of communication technology is opening up vast new opportunities to apply telemedical technology to a much larger spectrum of healthcare delivery.

It is true that even if the whole of telemedicine’s promise were to be fully realized, it is likely never to completely replace the face to face relationship between the healer and the afflicted. But with the rising cost of healthcare, anticipated physician shortages and a general increase in demand for healthcare, virtual medical care is attracting a much wider audience of support across the medical care industry. In a recent Wall Street Journal report on private equity firms, investors are increasingly interested in investing in the health-care sector, creating a tipping point for a newer early stage virtual healthcare industry. Until recently the technology, devices, applications, operating platforms and processes have been the elements receiving most of the attention, but with the increasing appearance of virtual telehealth centers at shopping malls and big box retailers, it may be time to expand our thinking on just how dramatic the disruption on the industry will be.

Some well-established healthcare systems are now facing a decision on where to most effectively invest their capital. Should it be in traditional brick and mortar facilities or in the newest telehealth information technology? While advancement of diagnostic technology and ground breaking progress in treatment options has been common in the industry for decades, the “hard” methods of engaging patients by the healer has seen little change since the “industrialization” period of healthcare more than a half-century ago. As mobile health monitoring devices become more reliable and capable, patients with chronic diseases are being monitored, evaluated and often treated without leaving the confines of their home or work areas, reducing the usefulness of centralized physical structures used to connect and treat patients with chronic diseases. Advances in surgical robotics, techniques and technology has resulted in less invasive surgeries being “off-loaded” from heavily supported hospital based surgical suites into less costly outpatient surgical facilities.

Telemedicine has made significant changes in delivery models for clinical and acute care in the last 5 years and is certain to provide expanded application and creative solutions for meeting challenges across the whole of the healthcare delivery spectrum. It’s time to expand our vision for utilizing communication technology in the delivery of healthcare. Telemedicine and telehealth is the future of healthcare delivery.



Atlanta Neurology and ACT Expanding Opportunities for Neurologists
October 5, 2015, 10:40 am
Filed under: News | Tags: , , , ,

Atlanta Neurology, a leading neurology practice, and AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services for hospitals seeking stroke and other urgent Neurological care, is offering a rare opportunity to join a well-established practice and also provide telemedicine.

Atlanta Neurology offers a competitive benefits package including health, 401(k), savings, and pension, profit sharing plan, and flexible schedules. The Atlanta-based position extends growth opportunities in the booming healthcare, business, and cultural capital of the Southeast. Metro Atlanta offers a mild 4-season climate, easy access to mountains and beaches, excellent schools, exceptional restaurants, and abundant entertainment options.

Atlanta Neurology is looking for a neurologist who is passionate about helping people by leveraging expertise in general neurology, stroke diagnostics, and general management. Natural leadership in emergency telemedicine, office, and hospital care is also important.

Board certification in Neurology and Vascular Neurology required. Experience using botulinum toxin in headache treatment and other conditions a plus. Atlanta Neurology is an equal opportunity employer. Recent fellows encouraged to apply.

Please send CV with cover letter to admin@acutecaretelemed.com.

 

About Atlanta Neurology

Established in 1970, Atlanta Neurology continues to grow in an increasingly competitive environment. Not resting on the laurels of its team of exceptionally rated neurologists (Atlanta Magazine and Top Docs ratings 12 years running), Atlanta Neurology recognized the need for remote stroke and urgent neurology care in underserved markets when telemedicine was in its infancy. Now both a leader in clinical practice–affiliated with Northside Hospital and Emory St. Joseph’s–and a nationally recognized pacesetter in teleneurology, Atlanta Neurology and ACT are a formidable partnership.

 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine

 Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.




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