AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


What Stroke and Heart Attack Have In Common

Because brains and hearts are highly dependent on oxygen-rich blood to survive, current guidelines from the American Heart Association call for treatment in under an hour for both strokes and heart attacks. The phrase “Door-to-treatment” refers to the time it takes from a patient’s emergency room arrival to the initiation of treatment.

In heart attacks, “door-to-balloon” more specifically refers to the use of an angioplasty balloon to relieve a constricted or obstructed blood vessel. In cases of stroke, the key phrase is, “door-to-needle,” referring to the administration of the intravenous medication tPA. The two different organs, with different vascular beds and dealt with by different teams of specialists within a hospital, remain subject to very similar constraints in time and quality measures.

The care of these patients requires a team approach with emergency room nurses and doctors rapidly initiating the process. At all hours, parallel specialized teams must stand ready to reverse critical brain and heart ischemia. Telemedicine technologies have proven to be an efficient solution in allowing very rapid access to quality care.

As leaders in the fight against the morbidity and mortality of these emergencies, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) leads the stroke team at several hospitals, ensuring that proper treatment is available to patients within the critical hour. In addition, ACT monitors stroke care and provides important feedback to the hospitals it serves, because constant evaluation of the timeliness and quality of treatment is a crucial component in reducing the “door to needle” time to help save lives.


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