AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


A Lens to View Technological Innovation in Healthcare

Keeping up with new technology feels like a sisyphean task. One way to think about technological innovation in healthcare is considering whether the innovation brings services to the patient or requires that the patient be brought to it. The former distributes care, while the latter centralizes it. Both have advantages; by distributing care, it is possible for many resources to contribute to care, and by centralizing care, treatment is focused at one site. Recognizing this technological dichotomy allows savvy hospitals to maximize their return on investment.

Dramatic improvements in radiology over the last 35 years exemplify centralizing care. New MRI and CT scanners dramatically improve our ability to diagnose complex conditions, but the machines’ bulk and expense mean that patients must be brought to them. The same rings true for the latest catheter-based therapies for heart and brain disease, requiring that the patient be brought to the specialized providers.

By contrast, telecommunications innovations distribute care, leading to improved patient outcomes regardless of locality. Translation services are a shining example: in the past, finding someone to translate a language like Amharic or Hmong was daunting, and in an emergency situation, it was simply unavailable. Thanks to new standards set by the Joint Commission, more attention will be paid to proper translation services. The Joint Commission standards reflect federal nondiscrimination laws regarding care of patients with limited English proficiency and recommend that patients be addressed in their preferred language. Now, thanks to successful providers such as CyraCom, dual handset phones can be brought to the bedside and certified translators in hundreds of languages are available in seconds

Telemedicine provides the best example of the power of distributive technological innovation. In stroke care, having experienced stroke neurologists readily available via telemedicine means that stroke patients have unlimited access to state of the art care. Being able to remotely conduct a video interview with the patient and family, examine the patient, and review the brain CT scan equates to faster and better care. AcuteCare Telemedicine’s stroke neurology experts, based in Atlanta, GA, contract with hospitals that need this type of coverage. By distributing care, these hospitals successfully avail their patients with top notch care and reduce treatment times, all while conserving a vital resource: the fossil fuel needed to physically bring the neurologist to the hospital.

 


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The advancement of health care is bringing good results to patients residing in remote areas. With telemedicine, they can benefit from the assessment of a doctor even without leaving the house.
GlobalMed

Comment by GlobalMed




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