AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Big Med Goes Back To School

In his most recent article in The New Yorker, contributor Dr. Atul Gawande demonstrates the value of quality-focused innovation in providing excellent service. Dr. Gawande nods to the Cheesecake Factory’s success in nimbly updating its large and varied menu as a potential model for healthcare innovation. Initially, he takes Big Med (as he calls organized American medicine) to task because, in his words, “good ideas still take an appallingly long time to trickle down,” but in the latter half of the article he provides examples of how the industry is getting things right.

Gawande’s own mother’s knee replacement surgery serves as his first example; by utilizing standardized protocols and equipment, his mother and her hospital achieved top results at a low cost. He then points to an innovative new way of managing patient data in real time that is serving to improve care: In Tele-ICU, nurses and doctors collect patient care data remotely from ICU patients and give direct feedback to the caregivers at the bedside. Using standardized treatment plans, Tele-ICU actually improves the quality of care while simultaneously lowering the costs associated with the sickest and traditionally most costly patients in the hospital.

As providers of teleneurology services, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) wholeheartedly agrees with Dr. Gawande’s observations. Improving the quality of care in emergency neurology requires a standardized, quality-driven approach. Simply put, something done frequently becomes something done well. Traditionally, most neurologists who take ER calls don’t get much experience treating acute stroke patients, and neurology training focuses on diagnosing the problem rather than emphasizing treatment options and paradigms. The nuances of tPA inclusion and exclusion and the decisions about other stroke treatment options mandate that the neurologist treating stroke emergencies be familiar with the most up-to-date practices. Who would you rather have piloting your medical care: the team that flies sporadically, or the one that flies every day?

 


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