AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Collaboration Across the Pond

Relations between the US and the UK are particularly amiable, arguably at an all time high, and moving towards modernity, our cultures have engaged in a ‘give and take’ from one another. However, when it comes to discussion of healthcare policy, our politicians and citizens are often quick to dismiss one another’s perspectives.

Despite the huge disparities in approach, each country’s current desires in regards to changing their healthcare situation are fairly equivalent. Both nations are working towards getting better value from healthcare expenditures, encouraging providers to focus on quality with better incentives, and controlling rising health care costs, regardless of the differences in who is paying.

Telemedicine offers both systems huge advantages in the pursuit of these goals, and the two can learn from one another. In the US, telemedicine has helped curb unnecessary and irresponsible healthcare spending, an important consideration for a nation currently obsessed with combating rising costs detrimental to its economy. Abroad, electronic patient care records are managed efficiently, falling in line with the expectations of the unified, government-controlled National Health Service (NHS) responsible for administrating healthcare.

It is important to keep in mind the great differences in context between the implementation of telemedicine in the United Kingdom and here at home. Of course, the NHS provides citizens with what we have dubbed as “Universal” health care, which is free to the patient at the point of service. In contrast to the Brits’ centrally governed and tax-funded system, care in the US is available through a multitude of competitive providers and is paid for by a patchwork of public and private insurers. The fact of the matter is, telemedicine works as a solution to a myriad of challenges, and both countries are discovering new solutions every day.

Healthcare officials in both countries envision telemedicine playing prominent roles in the future of their respective systems. Perhaps in the short term, this vision will be a common ground on which to open a mutually beneficial dialogue to address the unique challenges facing each nation.



A Shifting Attitude

Telemedicine’s role in the current healthcare environment has been blossoming over the course of the past few years, making progress towards the full realization of the field’s potential.  A certain percentage of healthcare professionals are already there; those who have seen telemedicine at work day in and day out already know that we are providing patients with excellent care, mitigating costs to the healthcare system, and saving lives. The challenge remains getting the rest of our industry and our patients up to speed.

Improving care standards and lowering health care costs are their own rewards, but also important is the evident change in the way people think about getting medical treatment. Telemedicine is significantly changing patient behavior. We have heard astonishing figures – flirting with near 100% satisfaction rates – when it comes to positive experiences for both hospital workers and patients.

Presumably, an estimated 20% of the roughly 140 million ER visits that hospitals bear each year are able to be treated virtually. That number jumps to around 70% when considering urgent care centers and primary care physicians. The aforementioned shift in attitude about how to best access care in emergencies and non-emergencies is crucial to opening the door for telemedicine to alleviate much of the burdens these unnecessary visits place on the system. Reducing the stress on physical and financial resources also means better care across the board when patients do come to the hospital.

The speed, efficiency, and improved coordination of care are all great assets for a society battling with the challenges of an inefficient traditional healthcare system. The good news is that the many advantages of telemedicine for payers, providers, and patients are truly beginning to take root with the public, and driving behavior that will lead to even better results down the road.



Good Things Come in Small Packages

As the fall approaches and we reach the third anniversary of AcuteCare Telemedicine, we have spent some time reflecting on our company and personal growth over the last three years. From simple beginnings, serving one health care facility in the metro Atlanta area, ACT has expanded to include facilities in rural communities of both Georgia and Tennessee. We have developed alliances with Emory University Hospital and the Georgia Partnership for Teleheath, two partners who enable us to provide the highest quality of acute neurologic care where it may otherwise be lacking. Turning our attention forward, ACT continues to push to ensure that every emergency department is staffed with adequate 24/7 neurology coverage, whether in person or via remote presence.

ACT has always believed that our successes are primarily due to the quality of services we offer. Despite our expansion over the past three years, ACT has remained a small, intimate company, still owned and operated by its four founding physicians. We find unique value in our size; it allows for outstanding continuity of care, frequent “meetings of the minds,” and quick, effective identification of problems and subsequent solutions.

Weekly meetings with all four physicians cultivate innovative ideas, enable problem identification, and facilitate the creation of solutions in a timely and efficient manner, advantages rarely possible in larger corporations. Thanks to the size of the company, each physician of ACT has a specific role, but can be flexible and share duties when needed, strengthening the consistency of the quality care we provide.

Being smaller has other rewards. In the world of acute neurological emergencies, there is little time for complex communication and red tape. When problems or concerns arise at any of our serviced facilities, an ACT physician can immediately make contact remotely and work directly with a facility member on issue resolution. Try calling up the CEO of your car’s manufacturer when your check engine light comes on.

The four physician-owners of ACT continue to practice neurology in a group that has been caring for patients for more than 65 years combined. We are highly trusted neurologists in our own community, and we are committed to bringing our expertise to other communities in need. Our small size ensures that we will stay focused on keeping our standards high and our integrity intact along the way.



ACT Speaks at Connecting Alabama Summit

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) Partner Dr. Keith Sanders and Sales Executive Michael Woodcock are travelling to Prattville, Alabama to attend the first annual Connecting Alabama – Telehealth and Broadband Summit from October 17th – 19th.

The event is hosted by Connecting ALABAMA, a government-sponsored initiative working with citizens and community leaders from across the state to improve high speed internet deployment, and the Alabama Partnership for TeleHealth, a charitable nonprofit corporation with a focus on increasing access to healthcare through the innovative use of technology. Together, the organizations hope to provide an opportunity to extend telehealth services throughout all 67 counties of the state.

Topics of discussion at the event range from technical considerations, to the state’s role in deployment, to policy issues, to the current state of telehealth.  Dr. Sanders will speak on Thursday, October 18th about the future of telemedicine, specifically stroke teleneurology. The work of Dr. Sanders and the other physicians of ACT in the field of teleneurology is particularly relevant in any discussion of healthcare in Alabama, as the state is located in the region of the southeastern United States known as the ‘Stroke Belt’ for its unusually high incidence of stroke and other cardiovascular diseases.

Dr. Sanders’ presentation will address necessary tactics for successful and sustainable implementation of telestroke programs, and the characteristics of effective regionally-oriented stroke care that are enabled by telehealth. “I am excited for the opportunity to share ACT’s vision of extending expert neurological care throughout the rural and underserved parts of Alabama and the rest of the country,” says Sanders. “Opening the dialogue at this inaugural event is a key step towards achieving a future with a better standard of care in a more interconnected world.”

For more information about ACT, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Turns 3!

This October marks the third anniversary of AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT). Over the course of its first three years, ACT has grown considerably during a period of significant change in the policy and industry of healthcare in America. The 4 Board Certified partners of ACT have retained a steady focus on their mission of filling a growing need for 24/7 neurology coverage.

Telemedicine has proven to be a burgeoning facet of the healthcare industry, with technological advancements and enhanced communications allowing providers to extend their reach over geographical boundaries to patients in need while simultaneously streamlining the healthcare delivery process and reducing associated financial and environmental costs. ACT has worked hard to stay ahead of the curve, offering the most cutting-edge solutions for saving lives in cases of neurological emergency.

Entering its fourth year of providing this expert neurological consultation via telemedicine technology to rural and underserved medical facilities throughout the Southeast, ACT looks forward to continued growth. As teleneurology continues to garner attention from hospitals as a practical and effective solution to neurologist staffing needs, the outlook for the company this year and beyond is extremely positive. “The message of ACT has really started to take hold in the healthcare community, and as our efforts for finding new hospital partners ramp up, we are optimistic that we will ultimately be able to reach even more patients with and offer them the level of care they deserve,” says Dr. Lisa Johnston, Partner, ACT.

“Following our rebrand of the company in 2011, we have stayed dedicated to our values as expert practitioners and our vision as a business,” adds Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “The standard of service we have been able to provide has only climbed higher. We are truly passionate about combating morbidity and mortality rates of acute stroke, right here at home in the Stroke Belt (a region of the Southeastern US with higher-than average stroke rates) and beyond.”

Hard work and diligence is paying off for the partners of ACT. As the group continues to practice neurology full time and commit themselves to reaching more patients in 2013, they hope to add to an already impressive list of achievements and accolades throughout their short history.

 



ACT Partner Taylor Regional Hospital Embraces Technology for Better Care Standard

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) partner Taylor Regional Hospital in Hawkinsville, GA is on the cutting edge of revolutionizing healthcare in underserved areas in rural parts of the Southeastern US.

Lacking the fiscal and logistical resources to implement the comprehensive services found at larger facilities in urban centers, Taylor Regional has openly embraced a wealth of new technologies to drastically improve the quality of care it offers patients within its surrounding communities.

Choosing ACT’s 24/7 teleneurology services was an elegant solution to a major deficiency facing the hospital. Taylor Regional has no neurologists on staff, and the nearest available specialists are located more than an hour away. Prior to the partnership with ACT, the hospital lacked the capability to effectively diagnose and treat stroke-causing clots, often having to transfer patients to a larger hospital, compromising crucial ‘door-to-needle’ time and reducing potential hospital revenues.

Through the adoption of beneficial programs such as the telemedicine services offered by ACT, the hospital has not only taken strides forward in treating patients internally, but has also enhanced communications with other facilities, connecting with other physicians for consultation and collaboration as well as streamlining transfer processes to ensure patients receive timely and expert care.

Most recently, the teleneurology services provided by ACT resulted in the administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in two separate cases of acute stroke at the facility in the month of August 2012. The two successful administrations of the clot-busting agent are a significant achievement, serving as a milestone for a teleneurology partnership that has now successfully extended this potentially-life saving service to residents of the counties surrounding Taylor Regional.

“We are very pleased with our partnership with ACT. The neurologists are extremely professional and eager for our telemedicine program to make a real difference in the care we are able to extend to our stroke patients,” commented Lynn Grant, Emergency Room and ICU Nurse Manager, Taylor Regional. “ACT is available 24/7, taking the time not just to be there for the patients, but for our physicians, nurses, and staff, answering questions and educating about the technology and techniques that are helping us save lives. Having this service is very rewarding.”

“Taylor Regional Hospital is on the cutting edge of emergency stroke care in rural Georgia. ACT has been particularly impressed with their clinical judgment, leadership and organization,” said Dr. James Kiely, Partner, ACT. “Their community is well served.”

For more information about ACT, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.



Opening the Dialogue to Better Care

Amidst much confusion and debate about plotting the best course towards achieving the so-called ‘triple-aim’ of increasing quality, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing costs, the healthcare community is struggling with communications amongst payers, vendors, and providers. Creating initiatives that encourage the development of more efficient, more sustainable healthcare requires the participation of all these entities in an ongoing conversation.

For physicians, making the ecosystem more intelligent is not exactly a simple proposition. Focused on delivering care, doctors typically do not have affinities for nor access to the kinds of information readily available to payers and vendors, such as performance metrics, analytics, and risk management considerations. Fostering an environment in which this data and knowledge can be openly shared is a pivotal step in helping doctors operate smarter.

As eHealth and the growth of telemedicine begin to significantly impact the delivery of care, the healthcare industry must address questions as to how physicians can better access these insights and be stimulated to embrace best practices, as well as how plan members can be similarly empowered to make better decisions. The answers come in the form of more open dialogue. Each party needs to share a similar, if not identical perspective on what constitutes quality to effectively collaborate.

With an ever-expanding arsenal of tools and knowledge at their disposal, physicians must call upon available resources in the form of industry partners to take advantage of this opportunity. The result will be a more intelligent system that benefits the entire network.