AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Breaking the Rules

The Georgia Composite Medical Board recently voted against implementing a rule requiring that any patient must be seen by a physician before receiving care from nurses or PAs via telemedicine technologies, a requirement that realistically cannot be met in most non-telemedicine encounters. It was a small but important victory for practitioners and patients alike.

Prior to being voted down, the proposed rule was drawing widespread criticism from proponents of telemedicine, and for good reason. The motivation for suggesting the rule was to ensure that all mid-level providers caring for patients via telemedicine were being properly supervised by doctors who are more familiar with the technologies. Certainly, taking steps to guarantee the quality of care and safety of patients, especially when dealing with new tools and methods, is of utmost importance to everyone involved in the care process. However, the rule would have been damaging to the improved access to care that is a hallmark of telemedicine, placing an additional an unnecessary step between patients who need immediate attention and the care they require.

With the increasing shortage of physicians, not just in Georgia, but nationwide, telemedicine has opened avenues for the delivery of quality care to individuals living in rural and underserved locales where providers simply are not available. As more practitioners educate themselves on the virtues of telehealth, the reach of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals will extend further than ever before.

Telemedicine will ultimately enter our vernacular and be known simply as ‘medicine.’ In the meantime, as our technology and methodology continue to evolve, we must be careful to steer clear of implementing laws such as the redundant rule proposed in Georgia to avoid setting precedents that will preclude telemedicine from playing its role in assisting our healthcare system reach new heights.


Leave a Comment so far
Leave a comment



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: