AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


If You Build It, Will They Come?

A recent report from the Pew Research Center measuring the number of adults using technology to track their health has presented some surprising findings.

The results of the Pew Internet & American Life Project survey, which were recently reported in iHealthbeat and supported by The California Healthcare Foundation, found that of 3,014 adults interviewed by phone, just 21 percent of the respondents actively used technology to track their health care. What may be even more surprising is that just 19 percent of those surveyed who owned smart phones, or just 7 percent of all respondents, had acquired an app to monitor their health. Susannah Fox, lead author of the report was surprised by the results and commented, “We’ve been looking at health apps since 2010, and health app uptake has been essentially flat for three years.”

A look at the science of the report, particularly the definition of “adults,” could give some more understandable insight as to the results and may produce answers for some of the “surprise” as to the outcome. Considering that most, older adults have a seemingly natural long acceptance curve when it comes to adopting technology and gadgets, and considering the well-entrenched privacy attitudes about everything to do with personal health information, the results may not be all that unexpected.

Purveyors of new communication technologies operate in environment where todays new devise and idea is often well into obsolescence by tomorrow; such rapid progression of invention to development is unmatched by other industries and beyond the understanding of most consumers. Expecting an equally aggressive acceptance rate by the markets is unreasonable, even when the benefits of convenience and utilization are so obvious to so many.

Given the generally slow acceptance rate of consumer health products, a three year period of market penetration may not be a reasonable benchmark to measure the success or failure of health care applications. Only more time will reveal if the “acceptance curve” will sharpen and the adoption and usage rates grow more dramatically.

“Build it and they will come”. Perhaps, but it may just take a bit longer for their arrival.


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