AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Is There a Doctor in the House?

For those who can still remember the day when your family physician came to the house in response to a telephone call requesting medical service, the current debate over the acceptance of telemedical services in place of face-to-face visits with a doctor will bring back memories of a similar debate exorcised over the abandonment of house calls with in-office visits. Back then the vocal decry from opponents to the change suggested that patients would reject the idea and inconvenience of traveling to the doctor’s office to receive medical care and that somehow the process would have a negative effect on the quality of health care.

Few predict that the face-to-face, hands on, talk to me now visits with a physician is likely to go the way of the personal home visits anytime soon.  However, organizations resistant to changes with the current medical services delivery model and are unwilling to consider utilizing telecommunication technology will not be able to meet the growing demands of the patients and communities they serve.

A recent study by Cisco reveals that 74 percent of consumers are open to virtual doctor visits.  The results of the Global Customer Experience Report focused on health care, demonstrated a shift in consumer attitudes toward personal data, telemedicine and electronic access to medical information. The global report conducted in early 2013, includes responses from 1,547 consumers and HCDMs across ten countries.

The results indicated that 80 percent of American’s were comfortable with submitting personal medical and diagnostic information to the cloud to help ensure that all relevant personal medical information is readily available to receive treatment.  Perhaps the most interesting result was that the findings challenged the assumption that face-to-face interaction is always the preferred health care experience by consumers. While consumers still depend heavily on in person medical treatments, given a choice between virtual access to care and human contact three quarters of patients and citizens would choose access to care and are comfortable with the use of technology for the clinician interaction.

The benefits of face-to-face visits to quality of care are valid and current telemedical service visits will not likely replace all physician/patient personal interactions anytime soon, nor should they.  But recurring studies are beginning to reveal that patient’s reluctance and suspicions of telemedicine is no longer a valid excuse for delaying the broader expansion of telemedical services.

Perhaps we shouldn’t be all that surprised that patient objections to a reduction in face-to-face doctor office visits are fading.  Consulting with your family health care practitioner, via telecommunication technology, in the comfort and convenience of your own home has a familiar ring.  House calls revisited? What goes around comes around?

 

 


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