AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Medicare Recipients to Lose Telemedicine Services Benefits

Even though the availability of telemedicine has proven its value by lowering costs, increasing access and improving treatment and remote monitoring for chronic diseases, thousands of Medicare beneficiaries will soon lose access to telemedical services simply because of where they live, or more accurately stated, how government statistics identify where a patient lives.

Medicare patients from Hawaii to Puerto Rico to Minnesota will be redefined as living in “metropolitan” areas, precluding them from receiving Medicare coverage for video conferencing and other telehealth activities, even though 80% of beneficiaries live in urban counties such as those cut from the list.

“Congress has long overlooked the need for telemedicine services for residents of urban counties, despite the fact that they often suffer similar problems accessing healthcare.  Now, because of a statistical quirk, even more people will lose coverage of these services, reducing access and care,” said Jonathan Linkous, CEO of the American Telemedicine Association.

Originally, telemedicine technology demonstrated its most obvious benefits to rural communities, where specialized and chronic medical services and treatments were often not readily available without significant cost and inconvenience to patients.  However, the same cost/availability benefits have proven to be just as effective in urban areas and when chronic illness and extended, after hospital, care is encountered.

A study provided by the Commonwealth Fund shows that telehealth consultations are effective in reducing the amount of time patients spend in the hospital for care of chronic illnesses.  By examining data from large telehealth programs run by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Partners HealthCare in Boston, and Centura Health, based in Colorado, researchers found that home monitoring programs can cut costs and raise patient satisfaction up to 85%.  Under the new guidelines, Medicare coverage will not be available for telemedicine visits to beneficiaries living in metropolitan areas–where over 80% of recipients live, resulting in cost reductions for the Medicare program.  Correcting this oversight will require an act of Congress, another incident of bureaucratic, regulatory interference with beneficial advancements in the delivery of healthcare to patients all around the country.

Given the increased involvement of government in the total delivery of health care in the coming years, this lack of insight does not bode well for reducing costs and improving availability to those who are most in need of the best in healthcare services.


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