AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


VETS Act Expands Veterans Access to Care

A bi-partisan bill, introduced by Representatives Charles Rangel (D-NY) and Glenn Thompson (R-PA) and cosponsored by 21 Members of Congress, would permit U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs health professionals to treat veterans nationwide with a single state license. The bill, known as the VETS Act, builds on the unanimous congressional enactment of the 2011 STEP Act (Servicemembers’ Telemedicine and E-Health Portability Act,) which provides a similar provision for healthcare providers in the U.S. Department of Defense. A similar licensing rule for patients and providers of Medicare, Medicaid and other major federal health programs was included in a comprehensive telemedicine bill submitted by Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA) in December 2012.

These bills are a simple way, while preserving the states’ role to license, to address shortages of medical specialists, to improve patient access to the best qualified physicians, and to accommodate mobile Americans and multi-state health plans,” said Jonathan Linkous, Chief Executive Officer of the American Telemedicine Association.  Currently, most providers who practice interstate telemedicine must be licensed both where the patient and provider are physically located. In some states, medical boards are even imposing stricter licensing requirements for telehealth providers than they do for in-person care, such as requiring a prior face-to-face examination for each and every case.

The Veterans Administration is consolidating many medical specialties in regional facilities that are often located a considerable distance from veteran patients who need regular treatments for injuries suffered in the defense of the country.  In some cases these patients need to travel into another state to receive specialized care, resulting in significant inconvenience and expense to VA beneficiaries.  The ability to treat these patients across state lines by use of telemedicine technology promises considerable benefits to patients and the VA care providers.

For the Veterans Administration who is currently experiencing a backlog of more than 500,000 requests for benefits, removing or lowering regulatory barriers will surely enhance the accessibility of care for patients living in areas remote from VA treatment centers while generating operational efficiencies for the VA.


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