AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Will Mobile Technology Help Close The Digital Divide?

A recent study is revealing that patients using telemedicine are more likely to be urban and well educated. Based on data from 53,000 households collected by the Census Bureau in July 2011, the report found 8 percent of urban Internet users took part in telemedicine initiatives, compared with 4 percent in rural areas. That stands in contrast to telemedicine’s common selling point that it can more effectively and conveniently provide services to people in remote locations.

Participants were also found to be wealthier.  At income levels of $100,000 or more, 11 percent of Internet users took part in remote care, compared 4 percent from households in the under $25,000 bracket.  The 25-44 age group was found to be the most likely segment using online services for medical care and information.

As access to telemedicine opportunities continue to grow it is expected that the demographics will likely shift to include lower-income and less-educated patients.  One technology that may improve access to telehealth services is the mobile or smart phone devices which appear to be closing the digital divide among various demographic segments of the population. Mobile technology has become especially critical for low-income minorities who have no other technological means of connecting to the internet.

Survey results released in September by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project indicate that African Americans and Hispanics are more likely than whites to own a smartphone, with 49 percent of Hispanics, 47 percent of African Americans, and 42 percent of whites owning these mobile devices.  For these groups, mHealth has the potential to be a powerful tool in promoting healthy living and preventive medicine, particularly in combating the high rates of diabetes in these populations.

Development of new and innovative health related mobile applications and growing the number of smart phones in the hands of the more economically challenged population promises to be an effective means to bridging the healthcare gap in America. Health and Human Services (HHS) has called on developers to create a mobile application to help educate minorities and women about cancer screenings and allow secure access to medical records.

Only time will reveal whether telemedicine’s promising benefits of increased access and lower cost of quality medical care will better attract and reach those who are most in need.


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