AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


If “What” is the Point and “How” Gets Us to the Point, Does “Why” Really Matter?

Achievement of any goal or objective begins with the question: What’s the point?  The answer to the initial question sets forth the purpose for implementing an effort to move forward to an end, or an objective. How is the strategic means to achieving the objective and if the journey is successfully achieved, does it really matter “why” we set out on the mission from the beginning?

In a recent article by Ty Montague, CEO and co-founder of co: and author of “True Story: How to Combine Story and Action to Transform Your Business,” he expresses his views on the importance of “why” in terms of storytelling versus storydoing. Storytellers think of a story as the domain of the marketing team. A company’s story is thought to be separate from the corporate strategy and is most often expressed through advertising. Storydoers, on the other hand, think of their story as a strategic asset and a competitive advantage. The narrative of storydoing companies is advanced through every action they take and those companies tend to be on a mission to make the world a better place, a quest that transcends revenue development and maximization. Their customers see and feel this higher goal in everything the company does and it makes them magnetic, creating fierce loyalty in their customers. Leaders and associates of storydoer companies tend to find their work experiences richer and more deeply satisfying and growing evidence suggest that storydoer companies are more efficient businesses that perform better financially over time.

Perhaps the purest example of an industry of Storydoers is those who deliver the broad range healthcare services to their customers, or patients.  Undoubtedly healthcare is a business, a very expansive and lucrative business, and one which requires revenue in excess of cost, or profit, to survive, prosper and prevail in its mission.  But it remains an industry whose practitioners are overwhelmingly called to serve the profession because “why” really, really matters.

Dr. James M. Kiely, a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C., AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) and Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at Northside Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta says, “I am so invigorated when I help a patient and help my Emergency Room (ER) colleagues. We make a real, immediate and meaningful difference every time we do our job. There are few people who can say that about their careers. I don’t like hyperbole but what we get to do every day for a living, rocks!”

“Why” matters.


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