AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Advancing the Benefits of Telehealth and Telemedicine

Dr. Teresa Myers, a family practice physician in Copley, Ohio, describes what she can see on her computer screen during a telehealth conference. “You know what HD television looks like. You can actually see the pimples on the actors’ faces,” she says. “I had a patient who was able to shine her iPhone flashlight to the back of her throat. I could see the exudates [pus-like fluid]. If you see that, you can be pretty sure.” A few more questions, as well as having the patient take her temperature and feel and describe her lymph nodes, and Myers felt confident diagnosing strep throat and prescribing an antibiotic.  The consultation started less than five minutes after the patient logged in, cost $49 and lasted 10 minutes. The patient never left home, learned a few things about examining her own body and, two days later, said she felt much better when Myers followed up.

The rural health care workforce is stretched to its limits in most states. Despite programs operated by state, federal and local governments aimed at recruiting and retaining primary care professionals to these areas, the need outpaces the supply in many communities. Also, many of the current primary care physicians are nearing retirement and the numbers to replace them are insufficient.

For many states with large rural populations, telehealth has emerged as a cost-effective alternative to traditional face-to-face consultations or examinations between provider and patient. Telehealth is the use of technology to deliver health care, health information or health education at a distance. Real time telehealth communications allows the patient and physician to connect and interact through video conferencing, telephone or video health monitoring device.  Store and forward telehealth refers to the transmission of data, images, sound and video from one care giver to another.

Forty-two states currently provide some form of Medicaid reimbursement for telehealth services and 17 states require private insurance companies to cover telehealth services. While individual states appear to be well out in front of the federal government on supporting telehealth innovation, the federal government is finally moving to catch-up with the recent introduction of “The Telehealth Enhancement Act of 2013 (H.R. 3306).”  The bill promises to strengthen Medicare and enhance Medicaid through expanded telemedicine coverage and calls for the adoption of payment innovations to include telehealth and to make other incremental improvements to existing telehealth coverage. Another Congressional bill, “TELE-MED Act of 2013” (H.R. 3077) would permit certain Medicare providers in a state to provide telemedicine services to Medicare beneficiaries in a different state.

The convergence of medical advances, health information technology, and a nationwide broadband network are transforming the delivery of health care by bringing the health care provider and patient together in a virtual world, especially those in disadvantaged areas. Telemedicine has the potential to improve health care access and quality to patients in urban and rural America alike, but a variety of barriers, such as reimbursement and licensing issues, continue to stand in the way of more aggressive, widespread adoption.

The recent progress by state and federal governing bodies to recognize the significant advantages of increased telehealth services for all Americans with the introduction of new and meaningful legislation to address and remove established barriers to expansion, is encouraging to those in the health care community whose fundamental goal is to provide the best quality medical care to their patients no matter where they live.


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