AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine Finding Support Among the Young and Affluent

According to a new RAND Corporation study, people who are younger, more affluent and do not have established health care relationships are more likely to use a telemedicine program that allows patients to get medical help by talking to a doctor over the telephone. Patients who used the service suffered from a wide assortment of acute medical problems such as respiratory illnesses and skin problems, and researchers found little evidence of misdiagnosis or treatment failure among those who used the service.  The findings, published in the February edition of the journal Health Affairs, are from the first assessment of a telemedicine program offered to a large, diverse group of patients across the United States.

“Telemedicine services such as the one we studied that directly links physicians and patients via telephone or Internet have the potential to expand access to care and lower costs,” said Lori Uscher-Pines, lead author of the study and a policy researcher at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. “However, little is known about how these services are being used and whether they provide good quality care. Our study provides a first step to better understand this growing health care trend.”

Among patients studied, the most common problems treated during a visit were acute respiratory conditions, urinary tract infections and skin problems, which accounted for more than half the cases. Other frequent reasons for were abdominal pain, back and joint problems, viral illnesses, eye problems and ear infections. More than a third of the visits occurred on weekends or holidays. Interest has grown in telemedicine programs because of the shortage of primary care physicians, which will likely worsen as more Americans acquire medical coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Telemedicine is one of the alternatives touted as a way to better provide primary health care without greatly expanding the number of doctors.

The implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is leading to increased demand that physicians interact with more patients, pointing to telemedicine as a potential solution. Most physicians believe that the quality of patient care is not compromised by telemedicine because it is delivered through different channels. Physicians can consult with more patients, and patients can meet with their physicians in a shorter time period. In terms of economic advantages, telemedicine can save a great deal of time for patients who otherwise would have to leave work, and it can reduce ER visits. According to Kenneth McConnochie, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Health-e-Access Telemedicine Program and professor of pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, N.Y., parents with young children consider time and lower expenses to be valuable commodities. By increasing its use of telemedicine, the medical center reported a 22 percent reduction in ER visits among schoolchildren. McConnochie pointed out that the average telemedicine visit costs $75 compared with $750 for a typical ER visit.

“The people who are attracted to this type of telemedicine may be a more technologically savvy group that has less time to obtain medical care through traditional settings,” said Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, a RAND researcher, co-author and an associate professor at the Harvard Medical School. However, researchers caution that more research is necessary to further assess the quality and safety of telemedicine services and to more adequately address concerns that expanded use of this type of telemedicine may lead to fragmentation of care. Still, the general consensus among patients and parents who used the service appeared to indicate that they believed that accessing medical services via telemedicine technology was much more convenient, saving them time and money.  For these consumers the convenience factor dominated over other concerns.


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