AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Why the VA is a Leader in Advancing Telemedicine

Initially used to reach those who live in rural areas, telemedicine is quickly expanding its reach into every area and genre of medical care delivery.

Interestingly, when the history of telemedicine is written, significant credit for hastening the advancement of telemedicine will go to a government health care agency that is not always credited with innovation and exemplary delivery of patient care and service.  The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is successfully deploying telemedicine on a large scale. In fiscal 2013, more than 600,000 veterans accessed VA care using telemedicine programs, for a total of more than 1.7 million episodes of care. The reach of VA’s telehealth services is growing at 22 percent a year. The agency is currently in the midst of a pilot program that allows veterans to enter vital information into an online tool that is accessible via mobile phones, tablets or desktop PCs to help their caregivers manage chronic conditions. The VA is launching another service that allows larger, better-resourced hospitals to connect with smaller facilities to provide remote support for intensive care.

“The VA did not get into telemedicine out of an inherent interest in technology”, said Dr. Adam Darkins, who leads national telehealth programs at the agency. Rather, VA officials wanted to help aging veterans with chronic disease live independently, for clinical and financial reasons. Although the VA has a network of 152 hospitals and more than 1,100 other caregiving facilities, it still faced the problem of having to cover a lot of territory in terms of reaching veterans. Additionally, officials found that 45 percent of those requiring treatment resided in counties classified as rural by the U.S. Census Bureau.

One big reason the Administration has been able to lead in the expansion of telehealth is attributed to its network of physicians who are able to treat veterans throughout the system without regard to state licensing rules, an advantage that private medical industry practitioners do not enjoy. The growing telemedicine industry is still working toward standardization and interoperability but the biggest impediments to the rapid expansion of telehealth remains state licensing and regulations that restrict treatment by out-of-state doctors.

Congress is beginning to take necessary legislative action to resolve many of the issues that are slowing telemedicine advancement in the private sector. The Telehealth Modernization Act, a companion bill backed by Reps. Bill Johnson (R-Ohio) and Doris Matsui (D-Calif.), would create a single, federal standard for telemedicine for use in national health care programs. And the Telehealth Enhancement Act from Reps. Gregg Harper (R-Miss.) and Peter Welch (D-Vt.) would expand reimbursement for telemedicine services under Medicare and Medicaid. It would also amend the Communications Act to support health care providers under the universal service requirement.

It’s not clear if any of those bills will pass, but the bipartisan focus on expanding telemedicine on that powerful committee indicates an interest in establishing some federal rules to make the patchwork of state laws more manageable for providers and insurance carriers. The VA has certainly provided an example of leadership as legislators clear the way for advancing the use of telecommunication technology in delivery medical care.


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