AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Recognizing the Symptoms of Stroke

While stroke awareness is a major concern for both men and women, a recent study concluded that women are less likely to recognize stroke symptoms. Only half of those surveyed know that sudden weakness or numbness on one side of the face, arms or legs is a warning sign of a stroke. 44 percent are aware that speech difficulty is a stroke sign while less than 1-in-4 could identify sudden severe headache, unexplained dizziness and sudden vision loss, or vision loss in one eye as the top symptoms of stroke. The study surveyed more than 1,200 women in the United States to assess their understanding of stroke’s warning signs.

The signs and symptoms of a stroke vary from person to person but usually begin suddenly. As different parts of the brain control different parts of the body, your symptoms depend upon the part of the brain affected and the extent of the damage.

The main stroke symptoms can be remembered with the word F.A.S.T.: Face-Arms-Speech-Time.

  • Face – the face may have dropped on one side, the person may not be able to smile or their mouth or eye may have drooped
  • Arms – the person with suspected stroke may not be able to lift one or both arms and keep them there because of arm weakness or numbness
  • Speech – speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake
  • Time – it is time to dial 911 immediately if any of these signs or symptoms at the earliest onset of these symptoms

For those living with or who care for somebody in a high-risk group, such as someone who is elderly or has diabetes or high blood pressure, being aware of the symptoms is even more important.

The acronym “FAST” is also meant to underscore the importance of rapidly delivering treatment to stroke patients. If given in time, a clot-busting drug administered during a stroke can lead to better outcomes and a decrease in the likelihood that a patient will suffer long-term disability. A recent study examined the effectiveness of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) relative to the delay in administering this clot busting drug. Researchers found that every minute tPA was delayed cost nearly 2 days of disability free survival. The researchers commented that their message is literally “Save a Minute, Save a Day.”

Although many Americans live relatively close to a hospital where emergency stroke treatment is available, few actually receive the recommended therapies. Researchers found that only 4 percent of the more than 370,000 Medicare patients who suffered a stroke in 2011 were treated with tPA. Most stroke victims fail to recognize the symptoms of stroke or call 911 early enough to receive the necessary treatment. tPA is most effective when administered within a 4 hour window of time.

Every minute counts for stroke patients. Remember to act F.A.S.T.!


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