AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine and the Medical Licensing Debate

The number of patients served by telemedicine has grown from a few thousand in the mid-1980s to an estimated 10 million people today. The majority of the growth occurred in the last decade, according to the American Telemedicine Association. Despite the rapid adoption of telemedicine practices by healthcare institutions, practitioners must meet individual state medical licensing requirements.

Some states argue that easing licensing requirements could jeopardize patient safety. If doctors practice without obtaining a license in that state, regulators maintain that they have no power to conduct an investigation or explore a consumer complaint. In addition, doctors would not benefit from any legal protections the state may have against malpractice lawsuits. Advocates of telemedicine argue that because doctors take standardized national exams, with many requirements set by federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, states should recognize other state licenses. The debate is not without merit, on either side of the issue.

In a time past, interstate commerce experienced similar obstructions to improving the nationwide consumer product and service delivery model. Implemented in an era before advanced transportation technology and the interstate highway system carriers of goods and services across state lines were required to have individual state licenses, adhere to 50 different sets of roadway regulations and pay transportation taxes and fees in every state where transportation service was provided. The very formidable barriers to streamlining interstate commerce were successfully circumvented by a new national regulatory and licensing system. The move successfully addressed the individual state concerns and resulted in massive improvements to the nationwide delivery of good and services to all consumers, no matter where they resided.

Today, as major telecommunications and health care firms look to create nationwide telemedicine businesses, state medical licensing boards are set to consider an “interstate medical licensure compact” that would give doctors and patients legal protections in any state that signs on. The proposal, to be considered at the annual meeting of the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) this month, would expedite the licensing process for doctors who want to practice across state borders. The compact, which was developed by a task force of 22 state medical boards, may represent the first step in resolving the issue. Lisa Robin, chief advocacy officer for the federation, expects there will be some early adopters. “I believe there will be some proliferation.”

The medical industry is facing significant challenges in the coming decades, such as physician shortages, spiraling costs of care, specialist accessibility and the entry of millions of new patients to the market as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is fully implemented. In order to implement a long-term solution, technology standards and medical licensing requirements share equal importance in the debate.


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