AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Universally Consistent Telemedicine Guidelines Still Out Of Reach

Recognizing the strong growth and innovative approach in telemedicine practices, the American Medical Association (AMA) enacted a set of guidelines for care provided by telecommunications earlier this year. The guiding principles seek to address the concerns and issues within the medical community relative to the development and implementation of telemedicine programs. The AMA guidelines support the “use of telecommunications in the delivery of healthcare while ensuring favorable standards of care; patient safety; quality and continuity of care; transparency; and the responsible handling of patient medical records and privacy.”

The action by the AMA appears to address the many valid concerns among the medical community while providing much needed flexibility, if telemedicine is to fulfill its many promises to increase availability of specialized medical services to rural communities, reduce costs of medical care and have a positive impact on the anticipated future shortage of physicians.

More recently, the Georgia Composite Medical Board enacted a new regulation governing the standards for telemedicine practice for physicians practicing in the state of Georgia. Much like the AMA guidelines, the regulations establish consistent standards of practice for providing treatment and consultation through the use of telecommunication technologies. The regulations were enacted after more than two years of evaluation and discussions by the state Board. The requirements, like those of the AMA, appear to successfully address many of the same concerns and issues.

The Georgia regulations require that all providers of telemedicine services, which include physicians, physician assistants (PAs) and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), hold a valid Georgia state license. However, one area of inconsistency between other proposed individual states requirements and the AMA guidelines is the requirement relative to prior in-person examination.

The AMA prefers not to specify whether the prior face-to-face examination requirement, before rendering treatment via telecommunication, must be performed in person or by a video encounter. The Georgia regulation specifically requires an in-person relationship prior to the any telemedicine service, but enumerates several exceptions and qualifiers which defer the requirement in specific instances. In many other states, including Tennessee, a much more defined requirement of pre-telemedical care relationship is mandated.

Perhaps the most prevalent impact of technology on our society is its effect on breaking down pre-existing divisions, both geographical and social. State lines, geographic hurdles and physical market limiting factors are obliterated by advances in telecommunications. If the full benefits of telemedicine are to be realized, consistency and clarity in regulations and guidelines must prevail.

Few in the healthcare community advocate for blanket federalization of regulations. The industry can do more to enact a core set of standards and practices that successfully address the bulk of concerns and issues of each entity while assuring every patient, regardless of where they reside, receives the best quality and most efficient medical care available.


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