AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Patching the Current System Will Not Advance the Great Promise of Telehealth

The deliberate march towards meeting the Federation of State Medical Boards’ (FSMB) goal of streamlining medical licensing of physicians continues. The FSMB promises that a new compact of seven states will trigger changes that will ultimately help reduce redundant licensing requirements by creating one place where physicians submit basic information such as their education and credentials. Last month Idaho and Utah were the latest states electing to join Montana and West Virginia as this compact attempts to speed up the process of licensing doctors across state boundaries. While some question why only seven states are required for implementation of this compact, just three more states are now needed to initiate the process that promises to remove a formidable barrier to telemedicine growth nationwide.

Despite being one of the most promising technologies to improve patient care and lower the rising costs of healthcare, telehealth is surviving in a regulatory environment that was established during an era devoid of modern telecommunication devices and technology. State physician licensing is currently controlled by 50 state medical licensing boards, each with their own requirements, policies and credentialing criteria. The current licensing process is a substantial impediment to the advancement of telehealth across state lines, sparking an intense debate over the need for a traditionally unpopular nationalized licensing system.

In an attempt to ward off yet another federal intrusion into states affairs, last year the FSMB proposed a voluntary national compact on joint licensing for the states. The goal is to secure the cooperation of enough states to quiet any calls to replace state-based physician licensing with a national program. The reason for the compact is that the FSMB previously approved a telemedicine policy that defines the location of the practice of medicine as the state where the patient is located, not the physician. The model legislation calls for at least seven states to participate in the compact in order to form a governing commission made up of representatives from the participating states.

From the outset industry leaders and telemedicine supporters saw the effort as a weak attempt to stem the growing tide to replace an outdated and inefficient system. The FSMB compact does little to address the cost associated with acquiring a license in each state and in fact increases the costs by adding fees associated with handling and processing the information.

Washington Board of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery Executive Director Blake Maresh says, “For some, the interstate compact offers a tested Constitutional precept that could creatively forestall federal intervention that might otherwise supplant the longstanding authority of state medical boards, for others the possibility of other state boards licensing physicians who practice in their states, coupled with the establishment of new governmental organizations, leaves them uneasy at best.”

It is certain that the authors of state and federal constitutions could not have envisioned the advance of modern technology and the impact of those advances on preserving and improving the lives of their constituents. Delivering the benefits of increased access to the latest and best medical care, improved patient outcomes and lower costs must trump preserving outdated constitutional precepts. We must intensify our focus on implementing new processes designed to advance the great promises of telemedicine.


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