AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


The Importance of Educating Legislators on Telehealth

Telemedicine legislation has been a frequent subject of much debate among healthcare professionals, Federal agencies, and State legislators. In recent news, the Governor of Delaware signed a new comprehensive telemedicine bill into law which requires healthcare companies to pay for telemedicine services at the same rate as in-person visits. Delaware joins 29 other states who have adopted similar requirements. U.S. Representative Mike Thompson is also actively working on the Medicare Telehealth Payment Parity Bill expanding the list of telehealth services available to Medicare patients.

In an effort to increase national attention on telehealth related issues, the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) is announcing The ATA Fall Forum, an event to educate members of Congress and push for important telemedicine policies. National Telehealth Lobby Day will be held on Capitol Hill in Washington DC. on September 16, 2015, and will be part of the event that includes training sessions on telehealth legislative priorities and expert tips on how telemedicine supporters can start discussions with Congressional leaders.

“Telemedicine has rapidly become the new standard of care,” comments Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, AcuteCare Telemedicine. “In order to drive positive legislative change, we must educate legislators on the importance of access to telemedicine as well as the overall impact of telemedicine to patients and healthcare organizations.”

The Association leadership believes the best way to influence members of Congress is through face-to-face interactions with legislators. Federal and state legislation regarding physician licensing, care quality, scope of treatment and reimbursement of telemedicine is critical to expanding healthcare access and improving patient outcomes.

The ATA is the leading international resource and advocate for advanced remote medical technologies. Established in 1993, as a non-profit organization, the ATA membership works to fully integrate telemedicine into a transformed healthcare system to improve quality, equity and affordability of healthcare throughout the world. Their mission is to promote professional, ethical and equitable improvement in health care delivery through telecommunications and information technology. The ATA Fall Forum in an opportunity to further this mission.

“As a leading practice-based provider of telestroke care, we support initiatives that open a dialogue with legislators, practitioners, and healthcare leaders with the intent on drafting smart legislation that will have a positive impact on our healthcare system,” said Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, AcuteCare Telemedicine.



AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) Exceeds Mid-Year Projections

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services for healthcare organizations seeking around-the-clock stroke and other neurological care, exceeds mid-year projections, adding to its previous 5 years of successive growth.

“As we expand our geographic footprint, ACT has been able to attract enterprise level healthcare systems looking for acute stroke care to support a network of hospitals,” comments Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT.  “Our practice-base model enables us to seamlessly integrate with our client hospitals.”

In March, ACT announced a collaborative partnership with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries. Patricia Lane, Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director of Neurosciences says, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but invested team members who take pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

The American Academy of Neurology reports that stroke is the No. 4 cause of death in the United States and is also a leading cause of disability, creating a shortage of neurologists focused on stroke or acute stroke care.  “With the shortage of neurologists and increased demand for stroke care, especially in rural or underserved communities, ACT works with healthcare organizations to establish teleneurology programs that increase access to critical neurological care,” comments Dr. James Kiely, Partner, ACT. “We remain agile with each client so as to integrate with an existing teleneurology program or assist in establishing a new program, whether a rural hospital or a large healthcare system.”

“We are pleased with the growth of our business and even more excited about the number of hospitals and patients we positively impact,” comments Gwynn.