AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


ACT and Bon Secours Committed to Improving Patient Outcomes

ACT Bob Secour photo1

(Left to Right: Rahul Patel, ACT Data Manager, Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner at ACT, Patricia Lane, Administrative Director Neuroscience at Bon Secours Health System Richmond, Suzanne Doolan, Hospital Systems Manager at Genentech, and Dr. Lisa Johnston, Partner at ACT.)

Atlanta, GA: AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking stroke and other urgent Neurological care, and the Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI) established a collaborative partnership earlier this year to enhance BSNI’s “around the clock” neurological service. ACT and Bon Secours have developed a telemedicine model focused on improving the delivery of care and overall patient outcomes.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals. Bon Secours established its teleneurology program 5 years ago with a goal of having all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. Patricia Lane comments, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours’ efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but an invested team member who takes pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

BSNI patients are the focus and the most important benefactors of this collaboration. Patients are able to receive timely, remote, emergency consultations with AcuteCare Telemedicine neurology specialists. “Our commitment to providing the highest quality of care and ongoing collaboration with BSNI is sure to have a significant impact on the patients and the communities BSNI serves,” say Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT.

ACT hosted Patricia Lane, Administrative Director Neuroscience at Bon Secours Health System Richmond, and Suzanne Doolan, Hospital Systems Manager at Genentech to review stroke treatment processes and patient outcomes. “The advancements in teleneurology not only allow us to access more patients in need of our specialized care, but in providing acute stroke care we are able to improve patient outcomes overall,” commented Sanders. “The success of this collaboration hinges on a seamless execution and a continued effort to evaluate and implement improvements.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine continues to expand its geographic imprint in telestroke care, advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. For more information on how to implement teleneurology services at your healthcare organization, contact ACT. 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.

About Bon Secours Virginia Health System

Bon Secours Virginia provides good help to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth. The not-for-profit health system employs more than 12,500 people, including nearly 800 providers as part of the Bon Secours Medical Group.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopaedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals.

– Bon Secours Richmond is St. Mary’s Hospital, Memorial Regional Medical Center, Richmond Community Hospital, Rappahannock General Hospital and St. Francis Medical Center.

– Bon Secours Hampton Roads is Maryview Medical Center, DePaul Medical Center and Mary Immaculate Hospital. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation

The Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation raises charitable funds to help Bon Secours Virginia Health System address the community’s growing health care needs with compassion and excellence. Through charitable support, we are dedicated to helping create healthy communities, advancing clinical innovation and providing an extraordinary experience of care. For more information on giving, visit www.bsvaf.org.



Telehealth Market Expected to Reach $17 Billion by 2020

Growth within the telemedicine marketplace continues to reach a fever pitch. Fueled by the shortage of physicians, increasing aged population, rising healthcare costs and expanding health insurance coverage for virtual healthcare, the emerging telemedicine market is set to soar in the coming decade. While some experts attribute telemedicine’s popularity to the to rise in smartphone use and consistent demand for quality virtual services, many healthcare systems are trying to reduce both the number of hospital visits and the length of stay in hospitals.

A new report entitled, “The Global Telemedicine Market Outlook 2020, studied the complete telemedicine industry which includes hardware, software and services. The telemedicine technologies market is anticipated to grow 8.4% and surpass $30 billion by 2020. “The report is a detailed study on the geographical distribution of telemedicine with the market sizes of North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific and provides an insight into different telemedicine applications.” North America is the largest market globally, accounting for more than 40 percent of the global market size.

Telemedicine, and the broader and increasingly more favorable term telehealth, includes medical services which use electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical healthcare. The relationship between telemedicine and health IT is recognized as complementary by the reports researchers.

Another report from information and analytics firm HIS predicts video consultations will jump to nearly 27 million in the U.S. market, a doubling of virtual video consultations between primary health care providers and their patients, in the next five years. The IHS report projects a cumulative annual growth of nearly 25% a year to 5.4 million video consultations by 2020. Healthcare payers are recognizing telehealth as a way for patients to get high quality care from a physician and to avoid a more expensive trip to a hospital emergency room. “We’ve seen growth in reimbursement,” Roeen Roashan, medical technology analyst with IHS said in a recent interview. “Specialty consultations are projected to jump from 14.5 million to 21.5 million.”

As the industry reaches new heights, the pace of growth will continue to be moderated by tepid physician support, outdated reimbursement models, technology costs, and legal and governmental regulations regarding telehealth practices. The industry has made significant changes in delivery models for clinical and acute care in the last 5 years. Telemedicine and telehealth programs are certainly proving to be the future of healthcare.



Telemedicine, the Future Venue for Healthcare

While many believe that telemedicine first made its debut just a little more than a decade ago, the practice of telemedicine can be traced back to the early years of the space program. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) pioneered the remote use of physiological measurements of astronauts and telemetered the data back to earth from the spacecraft. These early efforts from the 1960’s enhanced the development of satellite technology which led to the development of telemedicine. The decades since have brought significant advances to the technology, lower costs of equipment and an expansion of the potential uses in the medical industry.

Advancements in the fidelity, mobility and affordability of technology is changing the landscape for healthcare delivery. As the digital gadgetry becomes smaller, more portable and easier to use patient/consumers are advancing their expectations of telemedicine as payers look to reduce the costs of routine medical care and shorten the length of hospitalization. There is a vast array of new technology being applied to healthcare that promises to give patients more responsibility and control over their health and fitness. Wearable technology and wellness devices enable users to continuously monitor their vital signs and track their progress towards their fitness goals.

Future wearable devises will focus on accuracy and data integration as well as visualization capabilities; virtual models that promote the patients understanding and significance of the all the wellness data generated by the wearable devise.

The newest digital health trend, nanotechnology, may have a significant impact on healthcare. Nanotechnology’s precision and accuracy can aid in designing new drugs to specifically match a patients needs or monitor the progress of cancerous tumors in a patient’s body. While still in its infancy, nanotechnology is expected to be a significant digital health trend in coming years. Artificial intelligence is another digital health trend that will help physicians track a patient’s health and identify danger signs before an onset of a heart attack or stroke. As the costs of genome sequencing continues to decline, integration of personal genetics and research will advance the practice of genomics in the next few years.

“Access, cost, and convenience are driving it (technology) forward, plus advancement in technological capabilities”, says John Jesser, vice president of engagement strategy at Anthem Blue Cross, an affiliate of the Indianapolis-based WellPoint. “Historically, telehealth meant expensive video conferencing equipment in a clinic at one location and expensive video conferencing in a hospital somewhere else. (The technology) now allows doctors to log in and log out easily at their convenience and it allows patients to seek care when they want it, from their iPhone or Android. That’s changed everything,”

As virtual health initiatives move forward, new and valuable trends and telehealth technology solutions will continue to emerge and be adopted as the traditional methods of delivering medical care are challenged and disrupted at medical facilities, physicians’ offices and hospitals. The venue of choice for patients seeking medical in the future will more likely be smartphones, laptops, and tablets. The preferred provider will have to be knowlegable and comfortable with this rapidly changing healthcare delivery landscape.