AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine, the Future Venue for Healthcare

While many believe that telemedicine first made its debut just a little more than a decade ago, the practice of telemedicine can be traced back to the early years of the space program. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) pioneered the remote use of physiological measurements of astronauts and telemetered the data back to earth from the spacecraft. These early efforts from the 1960’s enhanced the development of satellite technology which led to the development of telemedicine. The decades since have brought significant advances to the technology, lower costs of equipment and an expansion of the potential uses in the medical industry.

Advancements in the fidelity, mobility and affordability of technology is changing the landscape for healthcare delivery. As the digital gadgetry becomes smaller, more portable and easier to use patient/consumers are advancing their expectations of telemedicine as payers look to reduce the costs of routine medical care and shorten the length of hospitalization. There is a vast array of new technology being applied to healthcare that promises to give patients more responsibility and control over their health and fitness. Wearable technology and wellness devices enable users to continuously monitor their vital signs and track their progress towards their fitness goals.

Future wearable devises will focus on accuracy and data integration as well as visualization capabilities; virtual models that promote the patients understanding and significance of the all the wellness data generated by the wearable devise.

The newest digital health trend, nanotechnology, may have a significant impact on healthcare. Nanotechnology’s precision and accuracy can aid in designing new drugs to specifically match a patients needs or monitor the progress of cancerous tumors in a patient’s body. While still in its infancy, nanotechnology is expected to be a significant digital health trend in coming years. Artificial intelligence is another digital health trend that will help physicians track a patient’s health and identify danger signs before an onset of a heart attack or stroke. As the costs of genome sequencing continues to decline, integration of personal genetics and research will advance the practice of genomics in the next few years.

“Access, cost, and convenience are driving it (technology) forward, plus advancement in technological capabilities”, says John Jesser, vice president of engagement strategy at Anthem Blue Cross, an affiliate of the Indianapolis-based WellPoint. “Historically, telehealth meant expensive video conferencing equipment in a clinic at one location and expensive video conferencing in a hospital somewhere else. (The technology) now allows doctors to log in and log out easily at their convenience and it allows patients to seek care when they want it, from their iPhone or Android. That’s changed everything,”

As virtual health initiatives move forward, new and valuable trends and telehealth technology solutions will continue to emerge and be adopted as the traditional methods of delivering medical care are challenged and disrupted at medical facilities, physicians’ offices and hospitals. The venue of choice for patients seeking medical in the future will more likely be smartphones, laptops, and tablets. The preferred provider will have to be knowlegable and comfortable with this rapidly changing healthcare delivery landscape.


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