AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Technology & Telehealth At The Center of Healthcare Debate

Many industry pundits are predicting that 2016 will be the year that technology and healthcare will become the center of the healthcare industry. With advances being made to modify century old regulations and processes governing the established patient/doctor relationship, telehealth services are positioned to become main-stream in the delivery of care all across the country. Rapid adoption of technology driven health services is expected to accelerate as payment for services, interstate licensing and accreditation issues, currently complicating expansion, are resolved. “2016 is the time for telehealth,” said Nathaniel Lacktman, a partner at Foley & Lardner who specializes in telehealth. A major factor, he said, is that providers are taking on more financial risk for managing the health of enrolled populations. “What a provider can do on the front end is use telehealth to make the patient more likely to interact with a clinician,” he said.

As an increased number of states are allowing physicians to provide telehealth services across state lines through collaborative licensure arrangements, insurers across the industry are discovering the cost advantages of reimbursing for virtual care. However, a recently published survey conducted in 2014 by The American Academy of Family Physicians indicated that while 78 percent of respondents believed that telehealth would improve access to healthcare, only 15 percent actually used telemedicine during the year. The survey also pointed to other barriers to wider acceptance which include the need for additional training for caregivers, continued reimbursement issues, cost of the technology and potential liability issues. 

“Telehealth use is in the early stages of adoption,” states the paper. “Many of the barriers to wider adoption may be addressed by policy changes. Strategies to address the top two barriers identified by this survey include health care stakeholders offering new opportunities for training in the use of telehealth services and payers increasing awareness of their current reimbursement for telehealth services, as well as developing new ways to reimburse the services.”

On the consumer side, awareness appears to be a major factor in the level of use. While consumers are quick to buy into the benefits of a marriage between technology and their interactions with care givers, the mechanics of actually making a virtual connection, and when it is appropriate, has many potential users pausing at the first step. Providers will need to embark on a strategy to guide patients through the process of making that first connection and reinforcing the experience.

It’s safe to say that telehealth and technology will continue to dominate healthcare conversations in 2016.


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