AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine is Closing the Gap Between Experts and Child Abuse Victims

Telemedicine’s entry into the healthcare process has been rather obvious over the past decade, particularly to those who have benefited from advanced stroke care, treatment for chronic diseases or convenient routine care for common illness. For those who live in areas away from advanced-care medical centers, telemedicine is closing the geographical gap to advanced, specialized treatment for stroke, diabetes and other coronary and neurologic disorders. As technology makes its way across the full spectrum of healthcare, providers are using the newest telemedicine technology to tackle one of their most difficult tasks: identifying a victim of child abuse or neglect.

Many cases of suspected child abuse arrive at hospital ERs, doctor’s offices or clinics where doctors and nurses can be less experienced in making a proper diagnosis. With the use of virtual technology the process of determining a proper diagnosis is enhanced, and the gap between child care experts and rural hospitals and advocacy centers closed. “We’ve saved lives, and we’ve saved families,” says Dr. Lori D. Frasier, division chief of child abuse pediatrics at Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital.

The Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and National Children’s Alliance provide financial support to more than 800 children’s advocacy centers across the country where treatment for victims of child abuse are benefiting from the use of telemedicine. It is also critical that a diagnosis of abuse be accurate. “The value is in the accuracy of the diagnosis,” says Patricia Goede, PhD, vice president of clinical informatics at XIFIN, “Over-interpreting something can be a huge cost to children and families.”

In Georgia, where much of the State’s populations reside in rural areas, the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Center for Safe and Healthy Children (CSHC) has used telemedicine since 2009. Jordan Greenbaum, M.D., Medical Director of Children’s CSHC says, “An evaluation utilizing telemedicine reduces parental anxiety and stress by providing prompt access to expert care and support. It also saves time and resources for authorities, who can lose a workday driving to and from Atlanta. And for rural medical providers, telemedicine relieves some of the burden of accurately identifying abuse and interpreting physical findings.”

In Florida a sharp increase in child abuse and a shortage of treatment specialist has exasperated an existing care differential between advanced care facilities and rural areas where child abuse rates are the highest. Providers in the state are working to expedite the development and initiation of telemedicine programs to address the growing problem. In the mid-west, at The Midwest Regional Children’s Advocacy Center at Children’s Minnesota, they’re utilizing the same platforms to share images and other tests and communicate with trained child abuse specialists.

Many formidable barriers to adoption and expansion of telemedicine remain, but as the utilization of the technology finds new and creative solutions across the range of medical services, closing the divide between specialized care and patients in need promises to remove many of the remaining, well-established opponents.


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