AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedical Technology: Creating a Healthcare World without Barriers

As with many other high tech gadgetry, revolutionary processes and scientific inventions telemedicine has its roots in the NASA space program. For those early adopters of telemedicine, the efficacy of the doctor/patient consultation and the ability to improve patient outcomes were on the top of the list for barriers to entry. Many thought that patients would be hesitant to trade personal face-to-face visits with their doctor for a consultation through a virtual robot. But as early adopters used the technology to bring specialized care to remote and distant rural areas, patients soon realized the convenience and cost savings of not having to travel long distances to receive the latest in specialized healthcare, and soon embraced the new experience in connecting with a doctor.

The process is now considered to be an ideal use of technology to monitor and connect healthcare professionals with patients over long distances. With the introduction and increasing popularity of wearable technology, the existing digital info-structure in many rural areas of the country limited the expansion of telehealth. With the recent introduction of ConnectAll, a new federal initiative aimed at building broadband parity across America, is expected to provide nearly 20 million more Americans with access to telemedicine. “The expansion of affordable Broadband will further solidify the rapidly growing telemedicine sector, which is transforming the healthcare paradigm,” said Jonathan Linkous, CEO, American Telemedicine Association (ATA). “This initiative helps to deliver the promise of more cost-effective healthcare delivery models, and promotes the expansion of telehealth services for all.”

With Medicare, Medicaid, and private health insurance carriers continually expanding the number of virtual services approved for reimbursement, a once formidable obstruction is disappearing all across the country and the world. A growing number of healthcare providers are now expanding their reach. “This is a world without boundaries, and that’s what we’re seeing,” said Andrew Watson, MD, chief medical information officer for University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s (UPMC’s) International and Commercial Services Division, “The advent of telemedicine in a world without boundaries is no different than using Facebook or Skype around the world. We’re just seeing this technology impact medicine.”

But not all of the walls to expansion have been breached. Much remains to be done to remove existing impediments such as state by state licensing and credentialing requirements. The established healthcare regulatory system with its myriad of governing bodies, Boards, and legislatures continues to be a formidable foe when it comes to interjecting new technology into the traditional face-to-face experience between the healthcare provider and patient. “In-person visits will likely remain the mainstay for local care for those fortunate enough to be around many physicians, but when minutes count in emergencies experts can step in and make the decisions that will determine a lifetime of health instead of a lifetime of disability. Telemedicine isn’t a fad but rather a disruptive innovation that flows naturally out of technological advances and has already contributed immensely to our society’s health. It’s a perfect fit for our shrinking resources,” says Matthews W. Gwynn, M.D., Partner, ACT.

ACT has been on the forefront of the use of telecommunication technology for years, remotely delivering live and interactive telestroke and other teleneurology solutions anytime, anywhere to hospitals and emergency medical centers throughout the Southeast. Progress in reforming the massive healthcare regulatory system is occurring as dedicated industry leaders tackle the challenges of integrating advanced remote medical technologies into the existing mainstream healthcare delivery model.


Leave a Comment so far
Leave a comment



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: