AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Is That The Sound Of Ice Breaking?

Until recently, the state of Arkansas was ranked last among all states in a recent report by the American Telemedicine Association on telemedicine practice standards. Like many other states, Arkansas’s treatment of healthcare via telecommunication technologies included restrictions forbidding caregivers the opportunity to treat a patient remotely without first establishing a face to face relationship. While other regulations purposefully and effectively deal with commonly acceptable policies that hold virtual healthcare treatment to the same standards of care as traditional in-person encounters; control the prescription of certain drugs via telemedicine; require the responsible handling of medical recording; and doctor/patient transparency, the restrictions on non-pre service face to face encounters and the insistence on individual state licensing of physicians is arguably the two regulations which proponents of telemedicine feel are hindering the wider adoption of telemedical services across the country.

Recently issued proposed amendments to its existing regulations have been approved by the State Legislature. Arkansas Code 17-80-117, will allow a doctor to establish a valid relationship with a patient without the need for an in-person exam, if the doctor “performs a face to face examination using real time audio and visual telemedicine technology that provides information at least equal to such information as would have been obtained by an in-person examination.” The rule also requires the doctor to establish a face to face follow-up visit when and if it is medically necessary.

The sound one hears from this action may just be the noise regulatory ice makes when it is breaking under the pressure of consumer demand and the application technological common sense. While the proposed changes do nothing to alleviate the cost and inconvenience of individual state physicians licensing requirements, the removal of the face-to-face, pre-telemedicine service requirement could open up the virtual care landscape in states where the face-to-face regulation still exists.

The Arkansas Board held a public hearing involving the proposed amendment to Regulation 2.8 and new Regulation 38 in June and encouraged telemedicine companies and healthcare providers looking to offer telemedicine services in Arkansas to review the proposed regulations and consider submitting comments.

Adoption of the proposed changes to Arkansas rules governing telehealth services may be seen as a water-shed action for healthcare professionals who believe consumers will benefit from both increased healthcare access and reduced cost when telemedicine is permitted to more freely expand across state lines.


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