AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


What’s In Your Digital Health Tool Box?

The early implementers of telemedicine faced resistance, skepticism, and predicted peril from an industry that has followed a standard of care, governed by regulations. Those initial trailblazers have prevailed in their efforts to improve access to specialized care for patients living afar from major medical centers, enhancing patient’s healthcare experiences and reducing the unnecessary cost of specialized treatment and ongoing chronic care. Their persistent efforts to merge the latest digital technologies in communication with modern medical care has spawned new terms to languages all around the world; Telepsychiatry, Telestroke, Telemedicine, TeleICU and Telehealth, just to name a few.

Technology is having a wider impact on how healthcare providers connect with their patients and dispense treatment. This connected health revolution is making everyone active participant’s in their healthcare through an ever expanding network of devices and platforms. But as is often the case, development of new technology can outpace the ability of an industry and their consumers to accept and engage the new methods.

Consumers have demonstrated an impressive demand and utilization of digital healthcare tools like activity trackers, smart watches and their accompanying health apps, but nearly half of the users complain that their caregiver is failing to integrate the data into a personalized healthcare plan. A survey, conducted by HealthMine, called “The State and Impact of Digital Health Tools,” found that “a significant amount of digital health data is not reaching doctors or health plans and that there appears to be a disconnect between where consumers would like their self-collected health data to go and how easy it is to share it.”

Many physicians articulate an understandable concern about the accuracy of many of these devices and the process of collecting and transferring the data. In a recent article Vaughn Kauffman, a global practice leader in PwC’s Health Industries Advisory, indicated that physicians have some apprehension around taking in data from mHealth devices and wearables. “Some providers are further down the road than others around utilizing these kinds of data for engagement. There’s the potential to extend the doctor-patient relationship to beyond the direct doctor visit interaction. And obviously, this would involve individuals opting in, as opposed to kind of a Big Brother phenomenon.”

While wearables continue to be popular, many once avid users are discontinuing their engagement with the technology. Some indicate their waning interest is due to not understanding how the data collection will benefit them or enhance their digital health plan. Education and better understanding of the technology and how it can benefit both providers and patients in improving the delivery of healthcare will solidify the acceptance and use of the technology. The early pioneers of telemedicine have opened the trail to a much larger spectrum of services but wider engagement is still dependent on the ability of technology to deliver on its promises.