AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


AcuteCare Telemedicine Announcing New Partnership with Bon Secours in Collaboration with InTouch Health

 

AcuteCare Telemedicine, the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care, announces its newest collaborative partnership with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries.

Bon Secours first established teleneurology initiatives 5 years ago at its smallest hospital, Richmond Community Hospital, with a goal to have all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. Patricia Lane, Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director of Neurosciences says, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but invested team members who take pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

By utilizing innovative telecommunication technology, BSNI patients are able to undergo remote consultation with AcuteCare Telemedicine neurology specialists in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Matthews W. Gwynn, CEO AcuteCare Telemedicine says, “The neurologists of AcuteCare Telemedicine look forward to helping the Richmond and Kilmarnock areas achieve even greater quality in emergency care for their neurological patients through timely, professional medical consultations using the latest advanced communication technology with our partners at InTouch Health.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine is collaborating with InTouch Health to bring 24/7 extended teleneurology services to BSNI. InTouch Health provides technology enabled services to healthcare providers for the delivery of high-quality clinical care virtually anywhere, anytime. The InTouch® Telehealth Network enables healthcare systems to deploy telehealth applications across their enterprise. Patricia Lane comments, “I just love the technology and clinical solutions platform. It allows for continuity in communications from doctor to doctor and permits the real-time sharing of information between care-givers. Our ultimate goal is to provide a better treatment plan for each patient. AcuteCare Telemedicine and InTouch are the right solution to attain our goals and objectives with our teleneurology initiatives.”

Yulun Wang, Chairman & CEO, InTouch Health said, “We are honored to partner with the Bon Secours Health System to bring greater access to quality care at lower costs into the communities they serve.  InTouch Health’s enterprise-wide Telehealth Network, in combination with high-quality remote physician services, can touch more of Virginia’s population through Bon Secours’ extensive network of hospitals and ultimately into ambulatory care facilities, clinics, long term care and patients’ homes.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine continues to expand its geographic imprint in telestroke care, and is very excited for the opportunity to drive impact for Bon Secours as they continue to enhance their telestroke network. “The advancements in teleneurology not only allow us to access more patients in need of our specialized care, but also improves patient outcomes overall,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, COO, AcuteCare Telemedicine. “The success of any program hinges on a seamless execution from door to needle. This collaboration is sure to have a significant impact on the patients and communities it serves.”

For more information on AcuteCare Telemedicine, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.

 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine 

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health System

Bon Secours Virginia provides good help to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth. The not-for-profit health system employs more than 12,500 people, including nearly 800 providers as part of the Bon Secours Medical Group.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopaedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals.

– Bon Secours Richmond is St. Mary’s Hospital, Memorial Regional Medical Center, Richmond Community Hospital, Rappahannock General Hospital and St. Francis Medical Center.

– Bon Secours Hampton Roads is Maryview Medical Center, DePaul Medical Center and Mary Immaculate Hospital. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation

The Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation raises charitable funds to help Bon Secours Virginia Health System address the community’s growing health care needs with compassion and excellence. Through charitable support, we are dedicated to helping create healthy communities, advancing clinical innovation and providing an extraordinary experience of care. For more information on giving, visit www.bsvaf.org. 

About InTouch Health

InTouch Health provides technology-enabled services to healthcare organizations for the delivery of high quality virtual care, anytime, anywhere.  InTouch Health has helped more than 100 healthcare systems deploy telehealth programs across their enterprise, and into other sites of care, quickly and seamlessly using its industry-leading combination of professionals, processes and practices.  The InTouch Telehealth Network provides users unmatched ease of use and diagnostic capabilities, proven reliability, FDA and HIPPA compliance, secure access control, and clinical and technical reporting.



The Georgia Partnership for Telehealth Spring Conference

The Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth (GPT) was founded on the advances in the continually evolving telecommunications technologies. Since its formation in 2008, GPT has grown to become one of the most robust, comprehensive telehealth networks in the nation. The hallmark of GPT is the Georgia Telemedicine Program, an Open Access Network, which is a web of statewide access points based on strategicGPT Image partnerships with successful existing Telemedicine programs, and the creation of new Telemedicine locations, to maximize opportunities for timely specialty services. When fully realized, the Program will enable all rural Georgians to access specialty care within 30 miles of their homes. GPT’s services and support can provide state of the art telehealth solutions for all Georgians.

On March 25, 2015 GPT will be sponsoring their 6th Annual Spring Conference in Savannah, GA. The conference is a great opportunity for healthcare professionals from all medical disciplines and specialties to learn how the most up-to-date telecommunications technologies are impacting the delivery of stroke care and other healthcare services. Attendees will experience telemedicine in an applied framework, build network relationships and gain exposure to the latest in telehealth hardware and software technology. The conference will include a Grant Writing Workshop and will feature presentations from foremost experts in teleneurology.

Dr. Keith A. Sanders will be presenting a talk at the conference entitled “Outcome Analysis Demonstrates the Value of Telestroke”. Dr. Sanders is Director and Founder of the Stroke Center of St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta and former Chairman of the Ethics Resource Committee and a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C. and AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT). “As medical practitioners, we are expected to apply the latest techniques and technologies to the treatment of our patients. However, it is incumbent upon us to analyze the outcomes to gauge whether there are meaningful benefits and share that knowledge with the greater medical community. Indeed, state-of-the-art telemedicine technology is advancing stroke care and saving lives,” says Dr. Sanders. “I’m looking forward to sharing my experiences improving outcomes and expanding access to quality, advanced stroke care with my fellow Conference attendees.”

The GPT Spring Conference will begin on March 25, 2015 and run through March 27, at the Hyatt Regency-Savannah at 2 West Bay Street, Savannah GA 31401. Online registration is now open. An array of exhibitor opportunities is now available. Additional information is available by contacting Samantha Haas at samantha.wainright@gatelehealth.org.



Making a Meaningful Difference to Lives around the World

It has been a little more than a year since Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth (GPT), the Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSU) and Casa Para Ninos Aleluya (CASA) launched its first international telemedicine program. The mission of the collaboration is to deliver much needed primary and specialized medical care to the children of the CASA orphanage through the use of telemedicine technology.  The orphanage is home to over 400 abused, orphaned and mistreated children and is located just outside of Guatemala City. The medical needs of hundreds of the children at CASA are met daily through a few nurses that manage a clinic on-site.

Shortly after the Program got underway, Dr. James M. Kiely, a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C., AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) and Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at Northside Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta was given the opportunity to demonstrate telemedicine capabilities at the orphanage and volunteered his time and talents to render virtual care to the youth of CASA.

Dr. Kiely remotely treated a 19 year old CASA patient with a history of intractable epilepsy. The young patient was on numerous medications but continued to experience recurring seizures. By using a high definition audio-visual connection provided by GPT, Dr. Kiely was able to interview the patient’s parents and examine the patient remotely. The imaging results, hemiparesis, and description of seizures allowed him to determine that the likely type and cause was attributed to porencephaly, the failure for one hemisphere of the brain to develop. Kiely was able to recommend appropriate medications to on-site doctors and to suggest additional steps to take if the patients epilepsy remained intractable. The process worked flawlessly and marked the beginning of a new relationship between the missions and medical providers across the region.

At a recent GPT Telehealth Summit this year in Florida, Dr. Kiely was brought up to date on the patient he first treated more than a year ago at the orphanage in Guatemala. A family member of the patient has recently received his Master’s Degree. He is now serving an internship with the Georgia Partnership for Telehealth who continue to provide ongoing support to the children of the Guatemala region through donated physician time. He had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Kiely and informed him that the young patient, his sister, is doing well.

Dr. James M. Kiely says, “I am so invigorated when I’m able help a patient and to make a meaningful difference in their future. Whether here at home, or around the world, it is extremely rewarding.”



Telemedicine is Providing Improved Access to Neurological Care

Before the introduction of telemedicine, small to medium sized rural hospitals often played the role of stabilize and transport centers, a brief stop-over for patients needing specialized treatment and care. Patients would receive treatment to stabilize their condition, were packed-up and then transported to urban healthcare centers where specialist were standing-by to administer much needed specialized treatment.

The process often results in delay for patients receiving important, often life-saving, treatment, inconvenience and increased costs. “Attracting and recruiting medical specialists is an ongoing challenge for smaller, regional hospitals who must balance the needs of their patients with the financial realities of healthcare in this demanding economy,” says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Director and Founder of the Stroke Center of Northside Hospital and AcuteCare Telemedicine CEO.   The merging of telemedicine with neurology is changing the “stabilize, pack and ship” role of smaller hospitals and is bringing life-saving neurological and advanced stroke care to their patients within their own communities.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care is continuing to expand their portfolio of client hospitals with the recent addition of Dodge County Hospital. Located in Eastman, GA, the 94 bed healthcare facility is a Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) affiliate that is dedicated to meeting the challenges of a changing healthcare environment.

Dodge County Hospital is a prime example of how telemedicine is helping smaller regional medical facilities achieve their mission of delivering the highest quality healthcare services to their patients and their communities. “Having the ability to consult with a neurologist remotely for treatment of stroke and other neurological maladies is allowing these hospitals to meet the needs of the patients in the communities they serve,” says Dr. Gwynn.

ACT partners with InTouch Health (InTouch), a leading developer and provider of remote presence devices and software, to bring remote telemedical care to its client hospitals. InTouch and ACT closely collaborate with their hospitals to easily integrate and improve the efficiency of the new remote service workflow processes as well as improve clinical performance and cost containment.  The client hospitals dedicated staff of medical professionals receive important, on-site training in the operation of the telecommunication robots and its software and form critical consultative relationships with ACT neurologist to ensure the highest quality patient care.

Smaller hospitals all across America are finding the cost of telemedicine an affordable solution to ensuring improved accessibility of critical care and specialized treatment for their patients no matter where they live



The Building Momentum of Telehealth

Some proponents of telehealth are predicting that 2015 will be the year consumers will discover the convenience and cost benefits of accessing common health care through a virtual encounter. Telehealth has been reported to be on the precipice of rapid expansion for several years now, only to have the predictions fall short of expectations, mainly due to an established industry infrastructure that seemed to be well behind the present day technology curve. As service reimbursement, licensing and technical issues continue to fall-away many predict the time for a break-out in telehealth is upon the industry.

Entrepreneurs are taking the lead in providing opportunities for consumers to access common medical care services through virtual technology. More than 200 entities have entered the “doctor on call” market, connecting patients with a doctor for remedies for common every day ailments. In some parts of the country the service is becoming routine.This year more than 300,000 users will connect with a medical care provider over the internet, with that number predicted to grow to more than 7 million by 2018 as consumers discover the ease of use, convenience and lower costs. The initial concern that consumers would resist abandoning the traditional face-to-face office visit with their doctor has quickly dissipated as savvy; tech accepting consumers embraced the convenience of the new experience. The momentum continues to build, but is the other side of the doctor patient equation as prepared and eager to accept and embrace the new technological aspect of healthcare delivery?

For decades medical care has become increasingly industrialized and structured, primarily out of a need to control costs and manage available resources effectively and efficiently. The personal relationship between care giver and patient suffered as time was allocated to attending to increased numbers of patients. As primary care physicians integrate virtual encounters into their practice of care, the technology promises to provide new opportunities to once again place the relationship at the center of the care delivery. The addition of virtual encounters to the doctor/patient relationship promises many challenges to the largest and arguably the most important segment of the medical care industry, the general practitioner (GP), however, delegating the majority of follow-up or less critical visits to telecommunication may leave more time for developing the quality of the personal relationship through the face to face visit.

The clamor from the consumer is loud and clear but the growth rate of telehealth may be more dependent upon the medical professional’s willingness and preparedness to lead the way to the advancement of the new healthcare delivery model.

Your patients appear to be ready, are you?



CMS Expanding Telemedicine Coverage

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have proposed rules that would provide telemedicine services to nearly 1 million new Medicare beneficiaries.  CMS proposes to increase the number of beneficiaries eligible for telemedicine by modifying their urban/rural definitions and proposes several new reimbursable telemedicine services.

The first change would extend reimbursable telehealth services to “originating sites” serving nearly one million rural beneficiaries living in large metropolitan areas. Currently, Medicare uses a strict county-based classification to enforce its rural-only rule for telemedicine coverage. The new rule would create a more precise urban/rural distinction based on geographically smaller census tracts.

The second proposed change would increase coverage for transitional care management services under Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes 99495 and 99496, involving post-discharge communication with a patient and/or caregiver. Reimbursement of these services will help healthcare providers deliver improved in-home care to at-risk beneficiaries and significantly reduce needless hospital readmissions.

Jonathan Linkous, Chief Executive Officer of the American Telemedicine Association cautiously supports the change and in a statement said, “This is one small step in the right direction.  For 15 years the federal government has placed strict restraints on the use of telehealth while employers, private payers, states and many other nations have moved boldly forward, improving the quality and reducing the cost of care. It is time to unleash the power of modern technology and allow Medicare beneficiaries, regardless of whether they live in a rural area, underserved inner-city, in a clinic or at home to be eligible to receive the benefits of telehealth.”

The proposal is currently open for comment and ATA encourages all telemedicine advocates to express their support.  The American Telemedicine Association is the leading international resource and advocate promoting the use of advanced remote medical technologies. ATA and its diverse membership work to fully integrate telemedicine into healthcare systems to improve quality, equity and affordability of healthcare throughout the world.



States are Leading the Way on Telemedicine Expansion

The states of Missouri and Kentucky are the two most recent states that are making significant strides in increased implementation and utilization of telemedicine.  Effective Jan. 1, 2014, a Missouri law (House Bill 986) makes private insurers responsible for reimbursing providers offering telehealth services just as these payers are for in-person services.  The bill states that insurers “shall not deny coverage for a health care service on the basis that the health care service is provided through telehealth if the same service would be covered if provided through face-to-face diagnosis, consultation, or treatment.”  While the new legislation benefits patients with private insurance payers, Missouri law still lacks provision for Medicaid beneficiaries.

In Kentucky, where state laws are in place for private and public payers, the legislators have expanded coverage of telemedicine services for Medicaid beneficiaries so long as these are delivered exclusively by way of interactive video-conferencing. The telehealth services covered by the law are extensive, ranging from mental health evaluations and care management to diabetes and physical therapy consultations.

These most recent events are indicative of individual state legislatures making the most aggressive progress towards removing regulations and passing legislation to accommodate the new technology’s use, while the federal government continues to focus on achieving a last place finish in the race for expansion.

American Telemedicine Association (ATA) CEO Jonathan Linkous said in a public statement recently. “The federal government places unnecessarily strict barriers and restraints on how Medicare patients are served when they deserve access to quality healthcare, regardless of geographic location and technology used.”

Kentucky and Missouri are joining a growing list of states that are realizing the benefit of telemedicine as a cost-effective delivery model for quality healthcare even though the two states have taken different approaches to expand access to telemedicine services. “This is a true win-win scenario,” said Jonathan Linkous, “First, it is a big victory for patients in Kentucky and Missouri, who now have greater access to the best-possible healthcare. It’s also a win for the treasury and taxpayers in those states, who will save significantly on public healthcare costs.”

With healthcare costs rising rapidly and access to specialized care diminishing for many Americans, it is well past a reasonable period of time for the top payer of medical services, the federal healthcare agencies and the U.S. Congress, to pick up the pace on making advances in passing and implementing legislation that will promote the advancement of telemedicine throughout the entire country.



Is There a Doctor in the House?

For those who can still remember the day when your family physician came to the house in response to a telephone call requesting medical service, the current debate over the acceptance of telemedical services in place of face-to-face visits with a doctor will bring back memories of a similar debate exorcised over the abandonment of house calls with in-office visits. Back then the vocal decry from opponents to the change suggested that patients would reject the idea and inconvenience of traveling to the doctor’s office to receive medical care and that somehow the process would have a negative effect on the quality of health care.

Few predict that the face-to-face, hands on, talk to me now visits with a physician is likely to go the way of the personal home visits anytime soon.  However, organizations resistant to changes with the current medical services delivery model and are unwilling to consider utilizing telecommunication technology will not be able to meet the growing demands of the patients and communities they serve.

A recent study by Cisco reveals that 74 percent of consumers are open to virtual doctor visits.  The results of the Global Customer Experience Report focused on health care, demonstrated a shift in consumer attitudes toward personal data, telemedicine and electronic access to medical information. The global report conducted in early 2013, includes responses from 1,547 consumers and HCDMs across ten countries.

The results indicated that 80 percent of American’s were comfortable with submitting personal medical and diagnostic information to the cloud to help ensure that all relevant personal medical information is readily available to receive treatment.  Perhaps the most interesting result was that the findings challenged the assumption that face-to-face interaction is always the preferred health care experience by consumers. While consumers still depend heavily on in person medical treatments, given a choice between virtual access to care and human contact three quarters of patients and citizens would choose access to care and are comfortable with the use of technology for the clinician interaction.

The benefits of face-to-face visits to quality of care are valid and current telemedical service visits will not likely replace all physician/patient personal interactions anytime soon, nor should they.  But recurring studies are beginning to reveal that patient’s reluctance and suspicions of telemedicine is no longer a valid excuse for delaying the broader expansion of telemedical services.

Perhaps we shouldn’t be all that surprised that patient objections to a reduction in face-to-face doctor office visits are fading.  Consulting with your family health care practitioner, via telecommunication technology, in the comfort and convenience of your own home has a familiar ring.  House calls revisited? What goes around comes around?

 

 



The Dollars and Sense of Telemedicine

With the anticipated “break out” of telemedicine services looming on the horizon, an important and significant obstacle still remains to be cleared away if wide-spread expansion and acceptance of medical treatment and services is to be realized.  As with the growth of any new industry it raises the question of who is going to provide the investment capital and who is ultimately going to pay for the services necessary to sustain the budding industry?

Even with the obvious benefits that telemedical services promises to bring to the traditional health care delivery model, change to the well-established and traditional minded payers of medical services continues to be a major detriment to the crack of the starter’s pistol that will unleash the race to expansion.  Currently there are five primary sources of funding for the $2.8 trillion healthcare markets in the United States, according to Jon Linkous, American Telemedicine Association (ATA) CEO.

Hospital and Healthcare Systems now permits providers the flexibility to pay for telemedicine services wherever warranted, over 100 million Americans are now covered and the number is growing rapidly.  This source remains the most fit of providers readily eager to set the pace.

Private and public employee insurers in the U.S. are expanding coverage of telemedicine but only 16 states currently mandate private insurance coverage.  This important source of funding continues to lag well behind the pace and is not likely to contribute seriously to a break-out soon.

Federal Medicare payments are currently approved for imaging and live consultations to patients in rural areas and Congress is expected to take up expansion of the payments in the coming year, but this is Congress an agency not known for leading or setting any records for implementing change.

State Medicaid coverage is available in 44 states at some level of reimbursement and three more states are considering full support in 2013.  In April, legislators in Arizona passed a law prohibiting insurers from denying payment for medical services solely because they are provided through telemedicine. The law is limited to providing payments in 13 specific rural areas and only for telemedicine treatment for seven specific conditions. The laws implementation was delayed until the end of 2014 to satisfy insurance industry concerns.  Such tentative, piecemeal advances’ provides little hope for a surge in Telemedical services being paid for by Medicaid provider’s in Arizona.  Apparently, as with justice, the wheels of bureaucratic change move slowly.

Direct federal healthcare agencies, such as the U.S. Veterans Administration, Department of Defense, Indian Health Service, federal and state and local corrections departments are active providers of remote health care.  This is rapidly expanding and increasingly relies on partnerships with non-governmental health providers.

Investment capital remains a concern for providers looking to aggressively enter the telemedical marketplace. While the mystery of how the new technology will generate returns on investment begin to fade in investors and venture capitalist minds, infrastructure funding sources are limited and somewhat timid in this hesitant economic environment.

The benefits of telemedicine to improve the access and quality of patient care is obvious, and makes perfect sense to providers, practitioners and patients alike, but the dollars portion of the “dollars and sense equation” is proving to be a more persistent challenge to expansion and sustainable growth of this new industry.



The VA Deploys Telemedicine and Telehealth Programs

The Department of Veterans Affairs  (VA) has released a comprehensive 400-page report that outlines its successes last year in the effort to improve veterans’ access to quality healthcare, including the implementation of an extensive telemedicine program. The report concludes that the use of telemedicine and telehealth has significantly improved veterans’ access to quality healthcare, and quality of life, by reducing the amount of time and travel needed to receive care.

The news is particularly encouraging given the performance level of the federal agency that is charged with providing ongoing medical care for millions of our nation’s military veterans.  Veteran Hospitals (VA Hospitals) have historically been located near large metropolitan areas, requiring patients to travel long distances for even the most basic of medical services.  The agency is making significant changes to its system, consolidating specific treatment into regional locations, causing some patients to be concerned about traveling even longer distances to receive their VA Medical Benefits.

Most recently the Agency has come under attack for its inability to process a long backlog of claims resulting in some veterans who have been waiting for treatment to coin the phrase, “Delay, Deny, and Wait Till I Die”.  Embracing the new telemedicine and telehealth technology programs may be the most promising decision the agency has made in the recent past to help turn the long history of inefficiency and questioned quality of care around.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 2012 Performance and Accountability Report, submitted by Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki in November, discusses the Department’s achievements in improving healthcare and benefits service delivery to veterans.  The report states that in 2012, the VA maintained the largest integrated healthcare system in America and implemented “new innovative practices to improve Veterans’ access to health care, such as telemedicine and mobile clinics, to provide care to more than 6 million unique patients.” Throughout 2012, nearly 500,000 veteran patients received 1.4 million telehealth-based consultations, which were delivered from 150 VA Medical Centers and 750 Outpatient Clinics.

Supporters of the VA’s utilization of the latest technologies to expand access to quality, primary and specialty care believe that it will transform healthcare delivery at VA Medical Centers while providing veterans solutions that enable greater access to their benefits, at a lower cost, all while improving the quality and outcomes of the medical care.

Telemedicine and telehealth technology is demonstrating its benefits of improved care, increased access and lower costs in the private sector.  Let’s hope that its application and practice at the VA demonstrates an equal measure of success.  Our military members risked their lives and suffered countless injuries in service to our country.  They deserve efficient, accessible, quality medical care for their commitment and sacrifice for protecting our freedoms and our country’s security.