AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


States are Leading the Way on Telemedicine Expansion

The states of Missouri and Kentucky are the two most recent states that are making significant strides in increased implementation and utilization of telemedicine.  Effective Jan. 1, 2014, a Missouri law (House Bill 986) makes private insurers responsible for reimbursing providers offering telehealth services just as these payers are for in-person services.  The bill states that insurers “shall not deny coverage for a health care service on the basis that the health care service is provided through telehealth if the same service would be covered if provided through face-to-face diagnosis, consultation, or treatment.”  While the new legislation benefits patients with private insurance payers, Missouri law still lacks provision for Medicaid beneficiaries.

In Kentucky, where state laws are in place for private and public payers, the legislators have expanded coverage of telemedicine services for Medicaid beneficiaries so long as these are delivered exclusively by way of interactive video-conferencing. The telehealth services covered by the law are extensive, ranging from mental health evaluations and care management to diabetes and physical therapy consultations.

These most recent events are indicative of individual state legislatures making the most aggressive progress towards removing regulations and passing legislation to accommodate the new technology’s use, while the federal government continues to focus on achieving a last place finish in the race for expansion.

American Telemedicine Association (ATA) CEO Jonathan Linkous said in a public statement recently. “The federal government places unnecessarily strict barriers and restraints on how Medicare patients are served when they deserve access to quality healthcare, regardless of geographic location and technology used.”

Kentucky and Missouri are joining a growing list of states that are realizing the benefit of telemedicine as a cost-effective delivery model for quality healthcare even though the two states have taken different approaches to expand access to telemedicine services. “This is a true win-win scenario,” said Jonathan Linkous, “First, it is a big victory for patients in Kentucky and Missouri, who now have greater access to the best-possible healthcare. It’s also a win for the treasury and taxpayers in those states, who will save significantly on public healthcare costs.”

With healthcare costs rising rapidly and access to specialized care diminishing for many Americans, it is well past a reasonable period of time for the top payer of medical services, the federal healthcare agencies and the U.S. Congress, to pick up the pace on making advances in passing and implementing legislation that will promote the advancement of telemedicine throughout the entire country.



AcuteCare Telemedicine and Ty Cobb Regional Medical Center Team Up to Improve Access to Immediate Stroke Care

Throughout Georgia and all around the country, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) responders are charged with reacting to emergency calls for assistance, providing emergency evaluation and treatment of a vast array of injuries and illnesses and delivery victims to emergency rooms for more advanced treatment.

The work requires split-second decisions that may affect the patient’s recovery.  Often the decision to bypass the nearest, more rural hospital for an urban medical center, known for its specialized treatment for such illnesses as stroke, can delay the patient’s arrival to that facility beyond the “golden hour”, the first sixty minutes after a patient begins to experience stroke symptoms and the critical window for providing care that can minimize long-term disabilities or prevent a stroke death.

At a recent conference at Ty Cobb Regional Medical Center (TCRMC) in Lavonia, GA, area EMS responders learned of a new program at the hospital that offers advanced critical, specialized care for victims of stroke. The goal was to educate emergency responders about its new telestroke program and how it can benefit the community, and TCRMC by capturing potential stroke patients that may have been otherwise bypassed by EMS personnel in the past.

The new teleneurology/telestroke program is a relationship between TCRMC and AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking advanced around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care.  Presenting the conference was Dr. David Stone, TCRMC Emergency Room Director and ACT’s CIO Dr. James M. Kiely, who is also partner at Atlanta Neurology, P.C. and Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at Northside Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta.

Members of the Franklin County and Hart County EMS were on hand to receive information about the new service line and EMS’ role in triaging potential stroke patients.  “The goal of this new relationship with TCRMC is to build awareness in the area about ACT’s 24/7 stroke treatment coverage and to advance the area residence understanding of stroke, its symptoms and the importance of receiving immediate specialized treatment, said Dr. Kiely.”

Attending EMS personnel received information regarding strokes “golden hour”, and when it is appropriate to take patients directly to TY Cobb Regional Medical Center or when it is better indicated to take patients directly to an advanced tertiary treatment center.

Recent studies indicate that telestroke programs, like the one provided by AcuteCare Telemedicine, may improve access to immediate stroke care by 40 percent and bring advanced care within reach of millions of stroke victims now located outside the hour of critical care for the fourth most common cause of death in the United States.