AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine Achieves Its Potential for Parkinson’s Patients

Ask any patient suffering from chronic disease and they often will tell a story of isolation, uncertainty and frustration over the debilitating effects of their disease. Many times the focus of their complaints is not being afforded easy access to specialized care and consultation with caregivers. While significant inroads have been made in the treatment options for chronic maladies like Diabetes and Parkinson’s disease, gaining routine, daily access to those ground breaking discoveries is out of the reach of many sufferers.

Researchers are looking at how modern communication technology, coupled with the latest techniques in treating Parkinson disease, can revolutionize the quality of care for sufferers of the chronic neurological disorder. “We are looking at quality of life, quality of care and reducing the burden on healthcare providers”, says Dr. Ray Dorsey, co-director of the Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics at the University of Rochester (N.Y.) Medical Center. “Imagine if you thought there was a possibility you had Parkinson’s disease, but you lived 100 miles or more from the nearest medical center with a qualified neurologist. You’re faced with at least a couple of hours of driving, of navigating an unfamiliar urban environment, of parking and walking—and that’s assuming you’re able to find a neurologist within driving distance to begin with. Now think about how easy it is to buy a book or a pair of shoes online. The two should not be so different.”

Preliminary results of the Connect.Parkinson project, the nation’s first randomized clinical trial of remote treatment of Parkinson’s disease, indicate the benefits of virtual treatment for patients and caregivers alike. A recent report on the initial results of the 18-state, Connect.Parkinson project reported that 95 percent of Parkinson’s patients completing telehealth visits have experienced an increased proportion of the time with a healthcare professional of 89 percent; up from 25 percent for those opting for traditional in-person encounters.

The National Parkinson Foundation is committed to supporting efforts to demonstrate how telemedicine can enhance the delivery of care to people with Parkinson’s. Studies are indicating that telemedicine care, often delivered in the patients home, is just as good as care received at a brick and motor medical center. The fact that diagnosing and monitoring the progression of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders is based almost entirely on visual observation makes Parkinson uniquely suited for virtual care technologies. Christopher Goetz, MD, a leading expert on movement disorders and director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Rush University Medical Center says, “Ninety-five percent of the information I gather is visual. Thus, with telemedicine visits where I can see and hear my patient right in front of me on the computer screen, there is no decline in the quality of information I gather.”

Rush is located in the state of Illinois which is among those states not yet mandating payers to provide payments for telemedical services. But according to Dr. Brian Patty, Rush’s chief medical information office and chairman of Rush’s Telemedicine Steering Committee, the Medical Center has several telemedicine pilot projects underway that can likely have significant impact on Parkinson patients.

In New York, researchers at The Rochester Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics, are developing and testing mobile apps that will help Parkinson’s patients track metrics such as dexterity, balance, gait, voice patterns and cognition, then send readings to researchers.

After decades of promises, telemedicine is delivering on its promise to increase access to quality, specialty care to improve patient outcomes.



Is That The Sound Of Ice Breaking?

Until recently, the state of Arkansas was ranked last among all states in a recent report by the American Telemedicine Association on telemedicine practice standards. Like many other states, Arkansas’s treatment of healthcare via telecommunication technologies included restrictions forbidding caregivers the opportunity to treat a patient remotely without first establishing a face to face relationship. While other regulations purposefully and effectively deal with commonly acceptable policies that hold virtual healthcare treatment to the same standards of care as traditional in-person encounters; control the prescription of certain drugs via telemedicine; require the responsible handling of medical recording; and doctor/patient transparency, the restrictions on non-pre service face to face encounters and the insistence on individual state licensing of physicians is arguably the two regulations which proponents of telemedicine feel are hindering the wider adoption of telemedical services across the country.

Recently issued proposed amendments to its existing regulations have been approved by the State Legislature. Arkansas Code 17-80-117, will allow a doctor to establish a valid relationship with a patient without the need for an in-person exam, if the doctor “performs a face to face examination using real time audio and visual telemedicine technology that provides information at least equal to such information as would have been obtained by an in-person examination.” The rule also requires the doctor to establish a face to face follow-up visit when and if it is medically necessary.

The sound one hears from this action may just be the noise regulatory ice makes when it is breaking under the pressure of consumer demand and the application technological common sense. While the proposed changes do nothing to alleviate the cost and inconvenience of individual state physicians licensing requirements, the removal of the face-to-face, pre-telemedicine service requirement could open up the virtual care landscape in states where the face-to-face regulation still exists.

The Arkansas Board held a public hearing involving the proposed amendment to Regulation 2.8 and new Regulation 38 in June and encouraged telemedicine companies and healthcare providers looking to offer telemedicine services in Arkansas to review the proposed regulations and consider submitting comments.

Adoption of the proposed changes to Arkansas rules governing telehealth services may be seen as a water-shed action for healthcare professionals who believe consumers will benefit from both increased healthcare access and reduced cost when telemedicine is permitted to more freely expand across state lines.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Team of Neurological Specialists Publish New Study

A new study published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases indicates a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network. “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” is authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) has remained committed to working with healthcare organizations to establish telestroke programs that not only improve access to specialty care but also significantly improve patient outcomes,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “It is critical to prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable.”

As stated in the background for this study, telestroke must demonstrate successful outcomes to achieve sustained growth and acceptance. Asserting that telemedicine is faster, employs the latest technology, or promotes a better use of limited re-sources is laudable but insufficient. An analysis of stroke treatment within a telemedicine network in 2013 showed that tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) could be safely and reliably administered within a practice-based model of telestroke care. Since then, hospital volume and tPA administration within this network have tripled. We hypothesize that a practice-based model of telestroke can maintain positive outcomes in the face of rapid growth. As a result, the study demonstrates meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network.

“Success in our business isn’t just about adding new healthcare organizations to our client portfolio,’ says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT. “As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care and improving patient outcomes.  This study is representative of our ongoing commitment to serve as a leader in telestroke care, establishing a standard of care and a model that supports the positive growth of telestroke programs across the country.”

Download the full article here.

 About AcuteCare Telemedicine

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.



The 21st Annual ATA Telemedicine Meeting & Exposition

The American Telemedicine Association (ATA), the leading international resource and advocate promoting the use of advanced remote medical technologies, announces the dates for its annual meeting and exposition for 2016. For 20 years, the ATA has focused fully on telemedicine solutions to transform healthcare systems. The results of the ATA’s efforts have generated significant impact for overall quality of care, equity and healthcare affordability.

The 2016 American Telemedicine Association Meeting and Exposition is expected to host as many as 6,000 thousand attendees at the Minneapolis Convention Center in Minneapolis, MN. The four day event will get underway on May 14 and conclude on May 17, 2016. ATA 2016 is the largest trade show in the world for healthcare professionals and entrepreneurs in the telemedicine, telehealth and mHealth space. The event will showcase a wide range of educational seminars, speakers and products and services related to telemedicine industry from over 300 exhibitors.

“AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) looks forward to participating at the event in 2016,” comments Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT. “We applaud the efforts of the ATA in advancing telemedicine opportunities and providing a platform for practitioners to share insights, research, and best practices.”

Established in 1993, The American Telemedicine Association is a non-profit association of individuals, healthcare institutions, companies and other organizations with an interest in promoting professional, ethical and equitable improvement in health care delivery through telecommunications and information technology.

For more information on the event, click here.

ATA Trade Show



Telemedicine Creates Opportunities to Improve Access to Neurologists

Discussions over an impending shortage of doctors in America are nothing new. The debate and predictions of an increasing shortage of general practitioners, neurologists, radiologists and other medical specialties has raged for nearly a decade. A study by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), a lobby for medical schools and teaching hospitals, said “the doctor shortage is real” with total physician demand projected to grow by up to 17 percent as a population of baby boomers ages. The nation’s shortage of doctors may rise to between 46,000 and 90,000 by 2025. “The doctor shortage is worse than most people think,” says Steven Berk, M.D., dean of the School of Medicine at Texas Tech University. “The population is getting older, so there’s a greater need for physicians. At the same time, physicians are getting older, too, and they’re retiring earlier,” Berk says.

Neurology is one specialty impacted by the shortage. With stroke being the number four cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States, lack of access to neurologists who specialize in stroke care threatens to deprive many patients the best chance of surviving the effects of stroke. More than 800,000 strokes occur in the United States each year and the number of strokes is expected to grow significantly due to a growing elderly population. The need to encourage more young physicians to specialize in stroke is critical.

Dr. Harold P. Adams, Jr., of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and Dr. Jose Biller, of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine believes, “Unless the number of neurologists focusing their careers on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with cerebrovascular diseases increases, a professional void will develop, leaders of professional neurology associations “need to develop and vigorously support a broad range of initiatives to encourage residents to enter vascular neurology. These efforts need to be started immediately. Time is short.”

Other experts believe that new technologies may hasten the response to the pending crisis and may extend the reach of medicine in ways that will address the problem. Health care professionals can serve more people by using telemedicine technologies to examine, treat and monitor patients remotely as well as providing patients increased access to advanced stroke care. These technologies are already keeping patients out of hospitals and doctors’ offices and providing improved recovery results. Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services, has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographic boundaries. AcuteCare CEO, Dr. Matthews Gwynn says, “Increasing access to stroke specialists requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. Technology affords healthcare organizations the ability to select a platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters while extending the highest quality of neurological care to the patients they serve.”

Telestroke is one of the most adopted forms of telemedicine, providing solutions to healthcare providers looking for 24/7 neurology coverage for patients. “Telestroke is filling a gap in terms of the speed and accuracy of stroke diagnosis and start of critical therapy, says Lee Schwamm, vice chair of the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and director of the hospital’s Telestroke and Acute Stroke Services, “Telestroke is the poster child of telemedicine. It’s a really nice example of where the business case is so evident and the benefit to patients is well-documented.”

“The shortage of doctors is definitely impacting the future of medicine,” comments Gwynn. “In response, we remain focused on providing access to quality neurologists to small hospitals in underserved communities as well as to enterprise level healthcare organizations via telemedicine.”



Best Integrated Campaign for Stroke Month Awarded to Bon Secours Richmond

ACT Blog Bonsecour Award

From Left to Right: Bob Silverstein, Enterprise Executive Sales Director, ACT; Dionne Henderson Director of Community & Multi-Cultural Initiatives at American Heart Association, American Stroke Association; Patricia C. Lane MBA, SCRN|Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director Neurosciences, Bon Secours Richmond Health System; Dr. Stacey Epps, Executive Medical Director Bon Secours Virginia Neuroscience Institute.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recognizes American Stroke Month by focusing on efforts to teach family, friends and coworkers how to recognize the signs of stroke.

This year The American Heart Association awarded Bon Secours Richmond Health System the Best Integrated Campaign Award for 2015. The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia provides full range of services to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth.

Bon Secours is accustomed to taking a leadership role in Neurological care, having established teleneurology initiatives more than five years ago with a goal to have all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. AcuteCare Telemedicine, the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care is collaborating with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries.

Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, AcuteCare Telemedicine, comments, “ACT is aligned with Bon Secours and its ongoing commitment to utilizing the finest and latest technology for the treatment of stroke. This award is evidence of their outstanding efforts to promote a fully integrated stroke program that improves awareness of the dangers of stroke and provides the best in acute stroke care to the communities we serve.”



ACT and Bon Secours Committed to Improving Patient Outcomes

ACT Bob Secour photo1

(Left to Right: Rahul Patel, ACT Data Manager, Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner at ACT, Patricia Lane, Administrative Director Neuroscience at Bon Secours Health System Richmond, Suzanne Doolan, Hospital Systems Manager at Genentech, and Dr. Lisa Johnston, Partner at ACT.)

Atlanta, GA: AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking stroke and other urgent Neurological care, and the Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI) established a collaborative partnership earlier this year to enhance BSNI’s “around the clock” neurological service. ACT and Bon Secours have developed a telemedicine model focused on improving the delivery of care and overall patient outcomes.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals. Bon Secours established its teleneurology program 5 years ago with a goal of having all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. Patricia Lane comments, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours’ efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but an invested team member who takes pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

BSNI patients are the focus and the most important benefactors of this collaboration. Patients are able to receive timely, remote, emergency consultations with AcuteCare Telemedicine neurology specialists. “Our commitment to providing the highest quality of care and ongoing collaboration with BSNI is sure to have a significant impact on the patients and the communities BSNI serves,” say Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT.

ACT hosted Patricia Lane, Administrative Director Neuroscience at Bon Secours Health System Richmond, and Suzanne Doolan, Hospital Systems Manager at Genentech to review stroke treatment processes and patient outcomes. “The advancements in teleneurology not only allow us to access more patients in need of our specialized care, but in providing acute stroke care we are able to improve patient outcomes overall,” commented Sanders. “The success of this collaboration hinges on a seamless execution and a continued effort to evaluate and implement improvements.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine continues to expand its geographic imprint in telestroke care, advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. For more information on how to implement teleneurology services at your healthcare organization, contact ACT. 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.

About Bon Secours Virginia Health System

Bon Secours Virginia provides good help to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth. The not-for-profit health system employs more than 12,500 people, including nearly 800 providers as part of the Bon Secours Medical Group.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopaedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals.

– Bon Secours Richmond is St. Mary’s Hospital, Memorial Regional Medical Center, Richmond Community Hospital, Rappahannock General Hospital and St. Francis Medical Center.

– Bon Secours Hampton Roads is Maryview Medical Center, DePaul Medical Center and Mary Immaculate Hospital. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation

The Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation raises charitable funds to help Bon Secours Virginia Health System address the community’s growing health care needs with compassion and excellence. Through charitable support, we are dedicated to helping create healthy communities, advancing clinical innovation and providing an extraordinary experience of care. For more information on giving, visit www.bsvaf.org.