AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Extreme Telemedicine and the Urgency of Now

January and the New Year bring the Consumer Electronics Show, an exposition of tremendous scale where the newest and flashiest concepts and prototypes for technological marvel are put on display for the public. Innovation in medicine was a hot-button topic at this year’s show, as more and more attention has been focused on the state of the US healthcare system.

There is a new television commercial from a leading innovator in communications technology making its rounds. A segment of the ad shows a group of climbers on a snow covered mountain communicating with a doctor on a tablet computer. The doctor is explaining how to set the apparently broken leg of one of the members of the crew. This 5 second scene, interspersed with other vignettes displaying the company’s visions for the future of its technologies, is an intriguing and exciting flash forward into the vast potential that telemedicine holds for the future.

Of course, one could imagine countless such scenarios in which powerful telemedicine will eventually play a game-changing role. We are on the cusp of a huge revolution in medicine, fueled by relentless innovation like that on display at CES or in the television spot.

The fact of the matter is that telemedicine has already brought this future to our doorstep. While the ‘dreamers’ consider what capabilities advanced technology might ultimately unlock, many physicians are already working with very advanced tools to address issues that are urgent now. For AcuteCare Telemedicine, the focus remains on offering sustainable and highly effective resources to deal with the increasing prevalence of stroke and other neurological emergencies. Through means made possible by telemedicine, ACT is already hard at work shaping the future of the fight against this epidemic.

Allocating resources towards new and innovative technologies and practices is an important part of creating tomorrow’s healthcare culture equipped with the right tools to care for patients. But it is also imperative that until we achieve that goal, we concentrate on applying the amazing technology already available to us to focus on the task at hand. In solving today’s problems, we set the stage for a better understanding of where to go next.



AcuteCare Telemedicine in 2013: Cutting Edge Neurological Care, Anywhere

Following a third consecutive year of growth in 2012, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), an Atlanta-based partnership of 4 board-certified neurologists, is expanding its efforts to become the leading provider expert neurological care to rural and underserved areas throughout the Southeastern United States via cutting edge telemedicine technology.

Telemedicine, once regarded as an exciting new frontier, has now been fully realized as a part of the mainstream lexicon of medicine as we enter 2013. For a large number of hospital systems, telemedicine programs are now becoming a mandate as the nation faces a growing shortage of specialized physicians.

ACT has established itself as an innovator on the forefront of the industry, taking a unique approach to telemedicine by leveraging new technologies and techniques to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT offers a broad range of customizable services including 24/7 emergency neurological consultation and support programs for facilities seeking Joint Commission accreditation as a Primary Stroke Center, but primarily specializes in telestroke: the application of telemedicine to the treatment of the acute stroke patient. With the help of ACT’s powerful and personalized services, patients throughout the ‘Stroke Belt’ states of the Southeast have drastically improved access to the care they deserve, and medical facilities increase efficiency while reducing the costs associated with maintaining a traditional emergency neurology staff.

Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, ACT has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographical boundaries. Achieving this goal requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. ACT is truly technology-agnostic.  This agility affords healthcare organizations with the ability to select the platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters.

ACT provides access to the best 24X7 acute neurological care. Contact Michael Woodcock to hear how teleneurology can impact your business and patients in 2013.



Investing in People

Telemedicine has garnered more attention as of late as a truly game-changing emerging field on the cutting edge of healthcare. Perceptions of the field have become increasingly favorable, but there is still a long road ahead to becoming part of the mainstream lexicon of medicine for patients and providers.

Presently, one of the most significant barriers to entry for new companies in telemedicine is the level of investment required on the part of potential client facilities. Revolutionary technology does not typically come cheap, and as healthcare spending continues to swell (albeit at a slower rate than previously), most facilities are working diligently to combat rising costs rather than add new programs to already bloated budgets.

The good news is that practical new technologies, regardless of how disruptive or expensive at the outset, have a habit of eventually finding their way into adoption. A common adage proclaims that every few years, the power of technology doubles and its price tag is halved. This implies that facilities which have temporarily chosen to forego the extensive advantages that telemedicine programs offer based upon steep startup costs will ultimately find the same solutions to be far more cost effective in the not-too-distant future. However, late adopters of telemedicine services do run the risk of losing their competitive edge. This is especially true in light of the rapid changes ahead in the healthcare landscape; the integration of telemedicine can make a hospital more independent of, or attractive to, consolidation by larger healthcare systems, depending on the goals of the client.

When considering teleneurology as a discipline in particular, hospitals must recognize that an investment in telemedicine is far more than an investment in the newest, best equipment; it is the foundation of a relationship with physicians who are among the most knowledgeable and experiences practitioners in their field. AcuteCare Telemedicine is truly technology- agnostic, meaning that regardless of the price tag of the machines that we leverage to connect with a facility’s patients or staff, a partnership with our physicians means that behind the machinery is the expertise needed to drastically improve the quality of care a patient can receive. We place value in finding quality tools to accomplish our mission, but our accessibility is by no means restricted by them.

Many healthcare leaders are still hesitant to make the investment in something new, but the time has come that the highest level of expert care be available to everyone, everywhere. It is our vision that hospital facilities will share in our agnosticism towards technology and invest in the people who will improve healthcare’s next generation.