AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Beam Me Up, Doc!

Telemedicine, the rapidly developing application of clinical medical services utilizing today’s advanced communication technology, is moving forward at an escalating pace. Challenges to its wide spread implementation are being overcome with advancements and refinements to the technology. As physicians and patients concerns over the effectiveness of care and information security are addressed, the promises of lower cost, more accessible, quality, health care conducted via the internet is gaining popularity among healthcare providers and patients alike.

With the concept of telemedicine now having been successfully established, AcuteCare Telemedicine is utilizing the modern communication technology to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT makes urgent stroke care accessible for more patients and cost-effective for hospitals and clinicians. Expanding clinical services where physicians electronically treat patients directly without a clinician being present with the patient is the most logical next step in the technology’s progression.

Patients and physicians in Hawaii are now able to enroll in Hawaii Medical Service Association (HMSA) Online Care program where patients receive care from participating doctors who are scheduled to be reachable at that moment. HMSA says thousands of patients have registered, and in New York, about 10,000 individuals, most of them residents of the New York metropolitan area, can already get an online emergency consultation with emergency room physicians.

Jay Sanders, president emeritus of the American Telemedicine Association says, “Probably the most powerful aspect of telemedicine is improving access and improving the convenience of a lot of elements of healthcare, so, whether you’re talking about folks who would have a hard time getting to a specialist or whether you’re talking about someone who is in a jam and needs to see a doctor before they go on a business trip, telemedicine clinics are very valuable. These technologies are unlikely to replace office or hospital visits entirely”, says Sanders. “But they are tools physicians can add to an evolving ‘electronic black bag,’ as he calls it—the updated equivalent of the battered leather case brought along on house calls in a bygone age.



Telemedicine in the Wake of Natural Disaster

As October 2012 came to a close, the arrival of Hurricane Sandy served as a haunting reminder that we can never underestimate the destructive and disruptive power of nature. The “superstorm” wreaked havoc on some of the most populous areas in the United States, not just causing billions in physical damage, but severely testing our infrastructure and its vital role in our society.

Considering the major implications that storms or other disaster events on this scale have for the healthcare industry, the days leading up to, during, and following Sandy were a demanding exercise in preparation, planning, and execution. The storm left countless citizens in need of medical attention, and threatened the adequate treatment of those already receiving care.

As one major resource put under the stresses of a disaster-level storm, hospitals and other healthcare facilities quickly became incapacitated by overcrowding, understaffing, a broken supply chain, and in select cases, power failures that crippled essential equipment. A small contingency of Mobile ERs were dispatched across the region, but a lack of pure manpower hindered the effectiveness of the efforts. Despite their mobility, the interrupted transportation systems within the affected communities prevented many from reaching the help they sorely needed.

Telehealth is an ideal candidate for addressing the challenges of these kinds of circumstances. The infrastructure of telemedicine is capable of delivering expert direction and attentive care to victims of natural disasters. The question of manpower becomes a negligible issue, as doctors and other respondents can call in from anywhere, and thanks to ever increasing internet access, the reach of the care administration is not limited by the victims’ location.

If emergency management agencies and telecommunications service providers are willing to work hand in hand with healthcare professionals, we now have the tools and knowledge to ensure that in future disaster scenarios, people can always have the support they need.