AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


ACT Expands to Meet the Increasing Demands for Technology-Based Care

ResearchMoz.us recently published the results of new market research study titled ‘Telehealth and Telemedicine Market in HealthCare Industry 2015-2020’ which projects the global telemedicine market to grow 18.5 (CAGR) percent through 2019. It is clear that the healthcare industry is experiencing considerable growth in the use of digital technologies across a wide range of healthcare specialties such as telehealth, telestroke, wireless health monitoring, wearable health devices, and EMR.

One of the earliest adopters of telemedicine continues to advance in popularity with hospitals who seek around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care. As the demand for Neurologists increases, there is a growing shortage of experienced physicians available to provide continuous coverage at many facilities throughout the United States. AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services located in Atlanta, GA was founded in 2009 to help hospitals overcome medical staff obstacles, ER diversion and help improve patient outcomes for stroke and other Neurological conditions. Since the fourth quarter of 2015, ACT has added numerous client hospitals to their expanding network and is responding to the increased demand for these services by adding qualified neurologists to their team.

“We are dedicated to preserving and strengthening our reputation as leaders in the field of telestroke care and continue to be fully committed to serve the needs of both our patients and client hospitals in a manner that is personal and highly professional,” says James M. Kiely, ACT Partner.

ACT is experiencing an impressive performance by demonstrating its values of integrity, transparency, accountability, collaboration and expertise. Matthews W. Gwynn, CEO, and ACT Partner comments, “We’ve set the standard of care for teleneurology and acute stroke care. We also believe in the importance of remaining technology agnostic and agile, permitting our client hospitals and enterprise-level systems to select the specific technology that best fits the needs of their respective facilities.”

The growing firm is also focused on results, continuously measuring performance across all of the healthcare organizations it serves to identify how to improve the process so as to positively impact patient outcomes. “We are one of the only telestroke providers publishing data centered on the success of our program,” says Lisa H. Johnston, ACT Partner. “We’re proud of setting a standard for other providers to follow.” The study, titled “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals”, was published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases and authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS. The results indicate that a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network.

“ACT has developed a model of telestroke care that many of our competitors aren’t able to replicate,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “Our results prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable. As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care.”



The Importance of Measuring Performance

Telestroke, the use of communication technology to remotely treat victims of acute stroke, continues to grow and has entered the mainstream of care in an ever evolving and increasingly disruptive healthcare delivery model. Like all medical innovations, telestroke must demonstrate successful outcomes to achieve sustained growth and acceptance. Merely asserting that telemedicine is faster, employs the latest technology, or promotes a better use of limited re-sources is laudable but insufficient.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care, understands the importance of evaluating and documenting telestroke performance. In their recently published study “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” the authors reveal that a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency.

“Success in our business isn’t just about adding new healthcare organizations to our client portfolio,’ says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, co-author and ACT partner. “As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care and improving patient outcomes. This study is representative of our ongoing commitment to serve as a leader in telestroke care, establishing a standard of care and a model that supports the positive growth of telestroke programs across the country.”

As virtual health initiatives continue to move forward, new and valuable trends and telehealth technology solutions will continue to emerge. Traditional methods of delivering medical care will be challenged and disrupted at medical facilities, physicians’ offices and hospitals. Dr. Keith Sanders, ACT Partner and co-author comments, “It is critical to prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable.”

For more information on how AcuteCare Telemedicine can assist you with acute stroke care, contact us!



Healthcare Regulatory & Policy Environment Impacts Telehealth Adoption

For those who first thought telemedicine’s role would be limited to a supportive, “add-on” process focused on a narrow list of ailments and other procedures and treatments, today’s reality must be shocking, if not a bit frightening.

Unlike technology where advances are frequent and common, changes to industry governing regulations are often found at the other end of the spectrum, and perhaps rightfully so. While some may argue that the healthcare industry is overly regulated, others argue that well designed regulations and practice standards is the fundamental reason that our healthcare system is the envy of the world. The suspicious practices of past centuries of treating patients have been replaced by a complex set of regulations that are diverse across all fifty states but is universally founded on all responsible care givers guiding mantra, “First, do no harm”.

But no matter how well intentioned and successful, the massive healthcare regulatory system with its myriad of governing bodies, Boards, and legislatures is a formidable foe when it comes to interjecting new technology that promises to greatly improve and enhance the experience between healthcare provider and patient. The changes perhaps once thought to require mere tweaking around the edges of the regulatory giant are proving to be far more involved and are likely to require a restructuring of the healthcare regulatory environment, a process that will certainly slow the advancement and adoption of telehealth. Progress is occurring, at a disruptive but deliberate pace perhaps, as dedicated industry leaders tackle the challenges of integrating advanced remote medical technologies into the existing mainstream healthcare delivery model.

The American Telemedicine Association, the leading international resource and advocate promoting the use of advanced remote medical technologies is leading the way and monitoring the progress of change across all fifty states through two annual publications; The 50 State Telemedicine Gaps Analysis, Physician Practice Standards & Licensure and The State Telemedicine Gaps Analysis, Coverage & Reimbursement.

Ultimately, the future of telemedicine and its rate of adoption are dependent on reimbursement and regulatory policies at the industry, federal and state level. Jon Linkous, the CEO of the American Telemedicine Association, counts understanding healthcare’s regulatory and economic structure as one of his top To Do’s for companies active in the telehealth industry.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Team of Neurological Specialists Publish New Study

A new study published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases indicates a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network. “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” is authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) has remained committed to working with healthcare organizations to establish telestroke programs that not only improve access to specialty care but also significantly improve patient outcomes,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “It is critical to prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable.”

As stated in the background for this study, telestroke must demonstrate successful outcomes to achieve sustained growth and acceptance. Asserting that telemedicine is faster, employs the latest technology, or promotes a better use of limited re-sources is laudable but insufficient. An analysis of stroke treatment within a telemedicine network in 2013 showed that tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) could be safely and reliably administered within a practice-based model of telestroke care. Since then, hospital volume and tPA administration within this network have tripled. We hypothesize that a practice-based model of telestroke can maintain positive outcomes in the face of rapid growth. As a result, the study demonstrates meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network.

“Success in our business isn’t just about adding new healthcare organizations to our client portfolio,’ says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT. “As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care and improving patient outcomes.  This study is representative of our ongoing commitment to serve as a leader in telestroke care, establishing a standard of care and a model that supports the positive growth of telestroke programs across the country.”

Download the full article here.

 About AcuteCare Telemedicine

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.



The 21st Annual ATA Telemedicine Meeting & Exposition

The American Telemedicine Association (ATA), the leading international resource and advocate promoting the use of advanced remote medical technologies, announces the dates for its annual meeting and exposition for 2016. For 20 years, the ATA has focused fully on telemedicine solutions to transform healthcare systems. The results of the ATA’s efforts have generated significant impact for overall quality of care, equity and healthcare affordability.

The 2016 American Telemedicine Association Meeting and Exposition is expected to host as many as 6,000 thousand attendees at the Minneapolis Convention Center in Minneapolis, MN. The four day event will get underway on May 14 and conclude on May 17, 2016. ATA 2016 is the largest trade show in the world for healthcare professionals and entrepreneurs in the telemedicine, telehealth and mHealth space. The event will showcase a wide range of educational seminars, speakers and products and services related to telemedicine industry from over 300 exhibitors.

“AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) looks forward to participating at the event in 2016,” comments Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT. “We applaud the efforts of the ATA in advancing telemedicine opportunities and providing a platform for practitioners to share insights, research, and best practices.”

Established in 1993, The American Telemedicine Association is a non-profit association of individuals, healthcare institutions, companies and other organizations with an interest in promoting professional, ethical and equitable improvement in health care delivery through telecommunications and information technology.

For more information on the event, click here.

ATA Trade Show



Telemedicine Creates Opportunities to Improve Access to Neurologists

Discussions over an impending shortage of doctors in America are nothing new. The debate and predictions of an increasing shortage of general practitioners, neurologists, radiologists and other medical specialties has raged for nearly a decade. A study by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), a lobby for medical schools and teaching hospitals, said “the doctor shortage is real” with total physician demand projected to grow by up to 17 percent as a population of baby boomers ages. The nation’s shortage of doctors may rise to between 46,000 and 90,000 by 2025. “The doctor shortage is worse than most people think,” says Steven Berk, M.D., dean of the School of Medicine at Texas Tech University. “The population is getting older, so there’s a greater need for physicians. At the same time, physicians are getting older, too, and they’re retiring earlier,” Berk says.

Neurology is one specialty impacted by the shortage. With stroke being the number four cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States, lack of access to neurologists who specialize in stroke care threatens to deprive many patients the best chance of surviving the effects of stroke. More than 800,000 strokes occur in the United States each year and the number of strokes is expected to grow significantly due to a growing elderly population. The need to encourage more young physicians to specialize in stroke is critical.

Dr. Harold P. Adams, Jr., of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and Dr. Jose Biller, of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine believes, “Unless the number of neurologists focusing their careers on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with cerebrovascular diseases increases, a professional void will develop, leaders of professional neurology associations “need to develop and vigorously support a broad range of initiatives to encourage residents to enter vascular neurology. These efforts need to be started immediately. Time is short.”

Other experts believe that new technologies may hasten the response to the pending crisis and may extend the reach of medicine in ways that will address the problem. Health care professionals can serve more people by using telemedicine technologies to examine, treat and monitor patients remotely as well as providing patients increased access to advanced stroke care. These technologies are already keeping patients out of hospitals and doctors’ offices and providing improved recovery results. Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services, has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographic boundaries. AcuteCare CEO, Dr. Matthews Gwynn says, “Increasing access to stroke specialists requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. Technology affords healthcare organizations the ability to select a platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters while extending the highest quality of neurological care to the patients they serve.”

Telestroke is one of the most adopted forms of telemedicine, providing solutions to healthcare providers looking for 24/7 neurology coverage for patients. “Telestroke is filling a gap in terms of the speed and accuracy of stroke diagnosis and start of critical therapy, says Lee Schwamm, vice chair of the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and director of the hospital’s Telestroke and Acute Stroke Services, “Telestroke is the poster child of telemedicine. It’s a really nice example of where the business case is so evident and the benefit to patients is well-documented.”

“The shortage of doctors is definitely impacting the future of medicine,” comments Gwynn. “In response, we remain focused on providing access to quality neurologists to small hospitals in underserved communities as well as to enterprise level healthcare organizations via telemedicine.”



AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) Exceeds Mid-Year Projections

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services for healthcare organizations seeking around-the-clock stroke and other neurological care, exceeds mid-year projections, adding to its previous 5 years of successive growth.

“As we expand our geographic footprint, ACT has been able to attract enterprise level healthcare systems looking for acute stroke care to support a network of hospitals,” comments Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT.  “Our practice-base model enables us to seamlessly integrate with our client hospitals.”

In March, ACT announced a collaborative partnership with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries. Patricia Lane, Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director of Neurosciences says, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but invested team members who take pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

The American Academy of Neurology reports that stroke is the No. 4 cause of death in the United States and is also a leading cause of disability, creating a shortage of neurologists focused on stroke or acute stroke care.  “With the shortage of neurologists and increased demand for stroke care, especially in rural or underserved communities, ACT works with healthcare organizations to establish teleneurology programs that increase access to critical neurological care,” comments Dr. James Kiely, Partner, ACT. “We remain agile with each client so as to integrate with an existing teleneurology program or assist in establishing a new program, whether a rural hospital or a large healthcare system.”

“We are pleased with the growth of our business and even more excited about the number of hospitals and patients we positively impact,” comments Gwynn.



THE AMERICAN TELEMEDICINE ASSOCIATION PROVIDES A FORUM FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY AND HEALTHCARE PRACTICES

For more than 20 years, the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Annual International Meeting & Trade Show has been the premier forum for healthcare professionals and entrepreneurs in the telemedicine, telehealth and mHealth space.  The event held at the Las Angeles Convention Center brought together 5000 attendees. With nearly a dozen keynote speakers and 13 educational tracks, it was a great opportunity for like-minded professionals to connect at the largest telemedicine trade show in the world.

With a focus on interactive learning, the ATA 2015 program offered a unique opportunity to learn and engage with leaders in healthcare technology. Attendees were able to take advantage of a myriad of educational and networking opportunities, interactive experiences, informal receptions and even digital networking sessions conducted through the ATA Meetings Mobile App.

The four day event promoted conversation centered on the challenges of advancing communication technologies and the implementation of potentially new provider service models. AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent neurological care, took the opportunity to strengthen relationships with leaders in the industry. ACT’s expert team of neurologists is setting a new standard for excellence in telestroke and urgent teleneurology care.

The meeting was a great success, according to Matthews Gwynn, CEO of ACT. “We have enjoyed our long association with the ATA and continue to support their efforts to grow telemedicine throughout the United States and the world. As we expand our business, it’s critical to understand how telemedicine is evolving not just in stroke care but other areas such as cardiology, radiology, chronic care, and global specialty programs.”

Established in 1993 as a non-profit organization, the ATA is the leading international resource and advocate promoting the use of advanced remote medical technologies. Its diverse membership works to fully integrate telemedicine into transformed healthcare systems to improve quality, equity and affordability of healthcare throughout the world. AcuteCare Telemedicine is looking forward to next year’s meeting which is scheduled for May 14 through May 17, 2016 in Minneapolis MN.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Announcing New Partnership with Bon Secours in Collaboration with InTouch Health

 

AcuteCare Telemedicine, the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care, announces its newest collaborative partnership with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries.

Bon Secours first established teleneurology initiatives 5 years ago at its smallest hospital, Richmond Community Hospital, with a goal to have all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. Patricia Lane, Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director of Neurosciences says, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but invested team members who take pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

By utilizing innovative telecommunication technology, BSNI patients are able to undergo remote consultation with AcuteCare Telemedicine neurology specialists in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Matthews W. Gwynn, CEO AcuteCare Telemedicine says, “The neurologists of AcuteCare Telemedicine look forward to helping the Richmond and Kilmarnock areas achieve even greater quality in emergency care for their neurological patients through timely, professional medical consultations using the latest advanced communication technology with our partners at InTouch Health.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine is collaborating with InTouch Health to bring 24/7 extended teleneurology services to BSNI. InTouch Health provides technology enabled services to healthcare providers for the delivery of high-quality clinical care virtually anywhere, anytime. The InTouch® Telehealth Network enables healthcare systems to deploy telehealth applications across their enterprise. Patricia Lane comments, “I just love the technology and clinical solutions platform. It allows for continuity in communications from doctor to doctor and permits the real-time sharing of information between care-givers. Our ultimate goal is to provide a better treatment plan for each patient. AcuteCare Telemedicine and InTouch are the right solution to attain our goals and objectives with our teleneurology initiatives.”

Yulun Wang, Chairman & CEO, InTouch Health said, “We are honored to partner with the Bon Secours Health System to bring greater access to quality care at lower costs into the communities they serve.  InTouch Health’s enterprise-wide Telehealth Network, in combination with high-quality remote physician services, can touch more of Virginia’s population through Bon Secours’ extensive network of hospitals and ultimately into ambulatory care facilities, clinics, long term care and patients’ homes.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine continues to expand its geographic imprint in telestroke care, and is very excited for the opportunity to drive impact for Bon Secours as they continue to enhance their telestroke network. “The advancements in teleneurology not only allow us to access more patients in need of our specialized care, but also improves patient outcomes overall,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, COO, AcuteCare Telemedicine. “The success of any program hinges on a seamless execution from door to needle. This collaboration is sure to have a significant impact on the patients and communities it serves.”

For more information on AcuteCare Telemedicine, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.

 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine 

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health System

Bon Secours Virginia provides good help to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth. The not-for-profit health system employs more than 12,500 people, including nearly 800 providers as part of the Bon Secours Medical Group.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopaedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals.

– Bon Secours Richmond is St. Mary’s Hospital, Memorial Regional Medical Center, Richmond Community Hospital, Rappahannock General Hospital and St. Francis Medical Center.

– Bon Secours Hampton Roads is Maryview Medical Center, DePaul Medical Center and Mary Immaculate Hospital. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation

The Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation raises charitable funds to help Bon Secours Virginia Health System address the community’s growing health care needs with compassion and excellence. Through charitable support, we are dedicated to helping create healthy communities, advancing clinical innovation and providing an extraordinary experience of care. For more information on giving, visit www.bsvaf.org. 

About InTouch Health

InTouch Health provides technology-enabled services to healthcare organizations for the delivery of high quality virtual care, anytime, anywhere.  InTouch Health has helped more than 100 healthcare systems deploy telehealth programs across their enterprise, and into other sites of care, quickly and seamlessly using its industry-leading combination of professionals, processes and practices.  The InTouch Telehealth Network provides users unmatched ease of use and diagnostic capabilities, proven reliability, FDA and HIPPA compliance, secure access control, and clinical and technical reporting.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Advancing Stroke Care

A little more than a decade ago, telestroke and teleneurology were words that where not even part of our language but today are synonymous with the delivery of life-saving treatments for stroke. In a time when medical specialist are in short supply  among the nations smaller to mid-sized hospitals and increasing financial pressures make maintaining a neurology service difficult even at larger hospitals, many are turning to telestroke programs to assure their patients have access to the finest quality care available.  “Attracting and recruiting medical specialists is an ongoing challenge for smaller, regional hospitals who must balance the needs of their patients with the financial realities of healthcare in this demanding economy,” says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Director and Founder of the Stroke Center of Northside Hospital in Atlanta and AcuteCare Telemedicine CEO. The combination of improving patient care, a growing shortage of neurology specialist and concerns over rising healthcare cost have converged to produce a significant increase in the utilization of communication technologies in the delivery of advanced stroke care

In a recent study, telestroke units helped increase the number of rural stroke patients treated and delivered treatment faster. In the 10-year evaluation of telestroke programs the study, published in the journal Stroke, found that the number of patients receiving the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for ischemic stroke rose from 2.6 percent to 15.5 percent and the median time between a patient’s arrival at a regional hospital until tPA was administered fell from 80 minutes to 40 minutes. In addition, the median time between onset of stroke symptoms and receiving tPA fell from 150 minutes to 120 minutes. During the same decade, the number of patients transferred from regional hospitals to stroke centers declined from 11.5 percent to 7 percent.

Telemedicine continues to make significant progress in providing quality, specialized care for stroke and other neurological ailments and is improving access to this care for patients who live in remote outlying areas not served by major urban medical centers. According to the American Telemedicine Association, more than half of all U.S. hospitals now use some form of telemedicine.

According to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers, telestroke programs are leading to lower cost. Stroke patients living in rural areas who receive care via a telestroke network experience, on average, nearly $1,500 in lower costs over their lifetime compared to stroke patients who do not receive telestroke care. The savings are primarily attributed to reduced resource utilization, including nursing home care and inpatient rehabilitation. The researchers evaluated a particular kind of telestroke care, with the healthcare provider acting as a hub that connects with a network of multiple hospitals, or spokes. They determined that when a telestroke system connects a hub with seven spokes it’s effective and cost-friendly for the patient. “This study shows that a hub-and-spoke telestroke network is not only cost-effective from the societal perspective, but it’s cost-saving,” said neurologist Bart Demaerschalk, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic Telestroke Program, and lead investigator of the study.

Thomas Hospital has been serving the communities of Baldwin County and Mobile Alabama for more than 50 years. A 150 bed hospital with a staff of more than 1300 dedicated medical professionals, Thomas Hospital has established a tradition for earning accolades for excellent service. Recently, in an effort to complement their existing neurological care department, the Hospital partnered with AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) and the Alabama Partnership for Telemedicine to provide virtual, 24 hour, seven days per week treatment for stroke and other neurological maladies. With its exemplary track record for providing outstanding care it is no surprise that it would seek to improve its neurological care services through the use of the latest communication technology. Dr. James M. Kiely, says “When you engage with AcuteCare Telemedicine you are engaging in more than a technical solution. You are gaining quality individuals to augment your medical staff.  Patients are able to engage with neurologists who are invested in their care.”

ACT has established itself as an innovator on the forefront of the industry, taking a unique approach to telemedicine by leveraging new technologies and techniques to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. “The interaction between patients and families and us with the two-way, secure videoconferencing system that we have, it’s the same as being there,” says Dr. Keith A. Sanders, AcuteCare COO. “The Neurologic exam for stroke and emergency Neurology can be as safely and reliably done remotely as it is in person, I don’t think we miss anything by not being there.” With the help of ACT’s powerful and personalized services, patients throughout the ‘Stroke Belt’ states of the Southeast have drastically improved access to the care they deserve, and medical facilities increase efficiency while reducing the costs associated with maintaining a traditional emergency neurology staff. Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, ACT has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographical boundaries. Achieving this goal requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. ACT is truly technology-agnostic.  This agility affords healthcare organizations with the ability to select the platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters.

At Dodge County Hospital ACT partners with InTouch Health (InTouch), a leading developer and provider of remote presence devices and software, to bring remote telestroke care to its client hospitals. InTouch and ACT closely collaborate with their hospitals to easily integrate and improve the efficiency of the new remote service workflow processes as well as improve clinical performance and cost containment.  The client hospitals dedicated staff of medical professionals receive important, on-site training in the operation of the telecommunication robots and its software and form critical consultative relationships with ACT neurologist to ensure the highest quality patient care. “Having the ability to consult with a neurologist remotely for treatment of stroke and other neurological maladies is allowing these hospitals to meet the needs of the patients in the communities they serve,” says Dr. Gwynn. “We look forward to expanding our family of client partnerships throughout the region.

Hospitals all across America are finding the cost of telemedicine an affordable solution to ensuring improved accessibility of critical care and specialized treatment for their patients no matter where they live. Dr. Lisa Johnson, AcuteCare CFO, sees the healthcare environment for telemedicine as an increasingly expanding area. “Unfortunately there is an exodus of neurologists away from hospital work and on call duty. There is a particular lack of neurologists in many rural hospitals,” as the trend continues, the need for telemedicine is only going to grow, especially in the field of Neurology, where assessing an acute stroke patient can be swiftly and completely performed via remote presence.”

If your hospital or hospital system is looking to establish a stroke center to offer the best in telestroke care, AcuteCare Telemedicine, as a practice-based provider, is the best solution. For more information, please contact ACT at info@acutecaretelemedicine.com.