AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Managing Diabetes Remotely With Telemedicine

Diabetes afflicts more than 22 million Americans, or 7% of the total population, and the number of people diagnosed every year is skyrocketing. At a cost of $245 billion in 2012, the disease’s toll on the economy has increased by more than 40% since 2007, according to a recent report from the American Diabetes Association.

Mississippi, which ranks second after West Virginia in the percentage of residents affected by the chronic disease, is taking steps to reduce devastating effects on the state economy and the overall health of Mississippians. Early this year, Gov. Phil Bryant, the University of Mississippi Medical Center and three private technology partners announced a plan to help low-income residents manage their diabetes remotely through the use of telemedicine. The goal is to help them keep the disease in check and avoid unnecessary hospitalizations while remaining as active and productive as possible. To make the project possible, Bryant signed a first-of-its-kind law requiring private insurers, Medicaid and state employee health plans to reimburse medical providers for services dispensed via computer screens and telecommunications at the same rate they would pay for in-person medical care.

The new reimbursement law will also pave the way for similar telemedicine projects for other chronic diseases, said Dr. Kristi Henderson, the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s chief of telemedicine, who is heading the project. Initially the project, called the Diabetes Telehealth Network, will enlist 200 people with diabetes in one of the state’s poorest regions, the Mississippi Delta, who will be given Internet-capable computer tablets loaded with software that will enable medical professionals at the University of Mississippi and a hospital in the region, North Sunflower Medical Center, to remotely monitor patients’ test results and symptoms. A third technology partner will provide technical support for the wireless telecommunications services needed to transmit the medical data.

The price tag for Mississippi’s telemedicine project is about $1.6 million. But to expand the program or recreate it somewhere else, Henderson said, would cost much less because the groundwork would be done. “We want to prove a model and replicate it.”

Nationwide, one in every five health care dollars is spent caring for people with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Mississippi’s telemedicine law, said Gary Capistrant, public policy director at the American Telemedicine Association, goes further than any other state to remove what the telehealth industry considers its biggest impediment, lack of insurance reimbursement.

Numerous states and medical groups already have expressed an interest in the project, Henderson said. “If we can do it in Mississippi, where chronic disease is at its worst, where poverty is at its worst, and where transportation and workforce issue are at their worst, we can make it work anywhere.”



Beam Me Up, Doc!

Telemedicine, the rapidly developing application of clinical medical services utilizing today’s advanced communication technology, is moving forward at an escalating pace. Challenges to its wide spread implementation are being overcome with advancements and refinements to the technology. As physicians and patients concerns over the effectiveness of care and information security are addressed, the promises of lower cost, more accessible, quality, health care conducted via the internet is gaining popularity among healthcare providers and patients alike.

With the concept of telemedicine now having been successfully established, AcuteCare Telemedicine is utilizing the modern communication technology to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT makes urgent stroke care accessible for more patients and cost-effective for hospitals and clinicians. Expanding clinical services where physicians electronically treat patients directly without a clinician being present with the patient is the most logical next step in the technology’s progression.

Patients and physicians in Hawaii are now able to enroll in Hawaii Medical Service Association (HMSA) Online Care program where patients receive care from participating doctors who are scheduled to be reachable at that moment. HMSA says thousands of patients have registered, and in New York, about 10,000 individuals, most of them residents of the New York metropolitan area, can already get an online emergency consultation with emergency room physicians.

Jay Sanders, president emeritus of the American Telemedicine Association says, “Probably the most powerful aspect of telemedicine is improving access and improving the convenience of a lot of elements of healthcare, so, whether you’re talking about folks who would have a hard time getting to a specialist or whether you’re talking about someone who is in a jam and needs to see a doctor before they go on a business trip, telemedicine clinics are very valuable. These technologies are unlikely to replace office or hospital visits entirely”, says Sanders. “But they are tools physicians can add to an evolving ‘electronic black bag,’ as he calls it—the updated equivalent of the battered leather case brought along on house calls in a bygone age.



Affordable Healthcare, On the Go

With the continually rising costs associated with healthcare in the U.S., two new reports suggest the market for telemedicine is poised to grow more than threefold within the next decade thanks to advances in wireless technologies in medical applications.

Mobile technology has paved the way for devices and infrastructure that are capable of mitigating healthcare costs by billions of dollars annually by reducing unnecessary hospitalizations and improving diagnostic and treatment efficiency. These telehealth solutions, many centered around wireless communications technologies, also help improve overall quality and timeliness of care administered, removing the traditional boundaries of distance and time in bringing patients and their doctors together over the web. Telemedicine ensures that patients receive the right care in the right setting to streamline the consultation process and fight excessive costs.

Telehealth has for some time now been proven as an effective means of delivering quality care, particularly to patients in underserved rural areas. Looking towards the future, practitioners are constantly gaining access to more powerful tools and increased mobility, reason to believe that telemedicine will extend more effective, more affordable healthcare to patients everywhere.

Already mobile technologies are steadily revolutionizing healthcare in a multitude of ways. In addition to patient consultation via communications platforms, the latest applications available to practitioners on smartphones, tablets, laptops, and other wireless devices can also help manage patient records, and encourage collaboration with other expert physicians.

Trends towards better technology and increased access to mobile platforms are fueling the rapid growth of telemedicine, which ultimately benefits both patients and providers. Just as mobile phones have given people the power to stay connected without the traditional landline, telemedicine is helping patients everywhere keep in touch with the quality care they deserve.