AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


AcuteCare Telemedicine in 2013: Cutting Edge Neurological Care, Anywhere

Following a third consecutive year of growth in 2012, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), an Atlanta-based partnership of 4 board-certified neurologists, is expanding its efforts to become the leading provider expert neurological care to rural and underserved areas throughout the Southeastern United States via cutting edge telemedicine technology.

Telemedicine, once regarded as an exciting new frontier, has now been fully realized as a part of the mainstream lexicon of medicine as we enter 2013. For a large number of hospital systems, telemedicine programs are now becoming a mandate as the nation faces a growing shortage of specialized physicians.

ACT has established itself as an innovator on the forefront of the industry, taking a unique approach to telemedicine by leveraging new technologies and techniques to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT offers a broad range of customizable services including 24/7 emergency neurological consultation and support programs for facilities seeking Joint Commission accreditation as a Primary Stroke Center, but primarily specializes in telestroke: the application of telemedicine to the treatment of the acute stroke patient. With the help of ACT’s powerful and personalized services, patients throughout the ‘Stroke Belt’ states of the Southeast have drastically improved access to the care they deserve, and medical facilities increase efficiency while reducing the costs associated with maintaining a traditional emergency neurology staff.

Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, ACT has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographical boundaries. Achieving this goal requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. ACT is truly technology-agnostic.  This agility affords healthcare organizations with the ability to select the platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters.

ACT provides access to the best 24X7 acute neurological care. Contact Michael Woodcock to hear how teleneurology can impact your business and patients in 2013.



Long Distance Learning

Along with other massive changes brought on by the increasing power and reach of the internet, the past decade has seen a drastic increase in the number of undergraduate and graduate degrees attained online. Today, more than 12,000 different “digital degrees” can be obtained from accredited U.S. universities, a figure that has grown by double digits annually for the last five years.

While the growth of the internet has enabled a plethora of such ‘distance learning’ opportunities for collegiate education, new technologies and practices in telemedicine are simultaneously reinventing the approach to professional education in hospitals and healthcare facilities around the world.

The educational aspects of telehealth programs demand the least effort and level of investment of any implementation of the discipline, but the benefits of adoption are immense, and can serve as the building blocks for increased engagement down the road.

Telemedicine actually allows hospitals to bring the education directly into the facility, offering professional training directly from the experts on the newest procedures and protocols, as well as serving as a 24/7 resource always available for consultation.  Bringing this type of program into a hospital not only helps administrators, physicians, nurses, and staff better perform their jobs and offer patients a better standard of care, but also creates champions of the telemedicine services, opening the door to a healthcare ecosystem that is far more responsive to innovation.

Introducing telemedicine to healthcare facilities through educational initiatives is also a great way to align the goals of the hospital and the provider to foster stronger relationships for the future. The facility wants to offer top quality care within the confines of a tightening budget, and the provider wants to help its client hospital save lives while reducing spending in the process to demonstrate its competitive advantage. The educational process is a great way to interface with the effective and efficient solutions that telehealth can offer. It is a major step towards a future where all hospitals have access to the resources they need to operate equally efficiently; a win for patient and provider alike.



Opening the Dialogue to Better Care

Amidst much confusion and debate about plotting the best course towards achieving the so-called ‘triple-aim’ of increasing quality, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing costs, the healthcare community is struggling with communications amongst payers, vendors, and providers. Creating initiatives that encourage the development of more efficient, more sustainable healthcare requires the participation of all these entities in an ongoing conversation.

For physicians, making the ecosystem more intelligent is not exactly a simple proposition. Focused on delivering care, doctors typically do not have affinities for nor access to the kinds of information readily available to payers and vendors, such as performance metrics, analytics, and risk management considerations. Fostering an environment in which this data and knowledge can be openly shared is a pivotal step in helping doctors operate smarter.

As eHealth and the growth of telemedicine begin to significantly impact the delivery of care, the healthcare industry must address questions as to how physicians can better access these insights and be stimulated to embrace best practices, as well as how plan members can be similarly empowered to make better decisions. The answers come in the form of more open dialogue. Each party needs to share a similar, if not identical perspective on what constitutes quality to effectively collaborate.

With an ever-expanding arsenal of tools and knowledge at their disposal, physicians must call upon available resources in the form of industry partners to take advantage of this opportunity. The result will be a more intelligent system that benefits the entire network.