AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Beam Me Up, Doc!

Telemedicine, the rapidly developing application of clinical medical services utilizing today’s advanced communication technology, is moving forward at an escalating pace. Challenges to its wide spread implementation are being overcome with advancements and refinements to the technology. As physicians and patients concerns over the effectiveness of care and information security are addressed, the promises of lower cost, more accessible, quality, health care conducted via the internet is gaining popularity among healthcare providers and patients alike.

With the concept of telemedicine now having been successfully established, AcuteCare Telemedicine is utilizing the modern communication technology to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT makes urgent stroke care accessible for more patients and cost-effective for hospitals and clinicians. Expanding clinical services where physicians electronically treat patients directly without a clinician being present with the patient is the most logical next step in the technology’s progression.

Patients and physicians in Hawaii are now able to enroll in Hawaii Medical Service Association (HMSA) Online Care program where patients receive care from participating doctors who are scheduled to be reachable at that moment. HMSA says thousands of patients have registered, and in New York, about 10,000 individuals, most of them residents of the New York metropolitan area, can already get an online emergency consultation with emergency room physicians.

Jay Sanders, president emeritus of the American Telemedicine Association says, “Probably the most powerful aspect of telemedicine is improving access and improving the convenience of a lot of elements of healthcare, so, whether you’re talking about folks who would have a hard time getting to a specialist or whether you’re talking about someone who is in a jam and needs to see a doctor before they go on a business trip, telemedicine clinics are very valuable. These technologies are unlikely to replace office or hospital visits entirely”, says Sanders. “But they are tools physicians can add to an evolving ‘electronic black bag,’ as he calls it—the updated equivalent of the battered leather case brought along on house calls in a bygone age.



Helping Healthcare Go Green

Telemedicine has leveraged technology to help hospitals overcome challenges associated with staffing and transportation extend higher quality healthcare to patients, regardless of their location, while simultaneously reducing costs. Now, we are beginning to understand that telemedicine not only helps hospital facilities run leaner; it may also help them be greener.

Hospital facilities are traditionally located in areas of higher population, often far away from patients living in rural communities. The transfer of these remote patients to hospitals for inpatient treatment demands relatively high energy consumption. With a foreseeable increase in numbers of patients requiring care in the future, these costs can be expected to rise if left unaddressed.

Within the context of changing environmental policy, increased focus must be placed on reducing emissions and energy usage in healthcare policy. Telemedicine has demonstrated positive effects, creating a more environmentally sustainable process by improving inpatient treatment in local community hospitals and improving monitoring of complex diseases in outpatient settings, avoiding unnecessary hospital admissions.

Physicians have traditionally placed a priority patient care over any environmental responsibility, but telemedicine offers opportunities to minimize environmental impact while developing a higher standard of care across the country. By combating energy consumption, telemedicine is improving not only the health of patients, but also the planet.