AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


The Era of Resisting Telemedicine is Fleeing

Despite the promise of significant consumer benefits of access and costs and the overall growth of Telemedicine, many patients and physicians are slow to adopt new communication technologies in the delivery of healthcare. A recent article in Medical Economics News reported that “A HealthMine Survey of 500 consumers who use mobile/Internet-connected health applications finds that 39% still have not heard of telemedicine, and only one-third of respondents say their health plan offers telehealth as an option.” And while many patients have not yet signed on to telehealth services, nearly three quarters of patients are interested in using it in place of in-person medical appointments. Could it be that the slow progression of patient participation may be due to resistance and lack of participation from care providers?

One of the most prolific reasons many providers resist the technology is the concern that patients would be unwilling to replace traditional face-to-face physician encounters with a virtual relationship and that many consumers would be fearful of the technology, particularly those among the growing number of “Baby Boomer” patients. But in a recent Georgetown University study, the results indicated that more than half of the aging generation preferred to use this technology. And among those 34 years of age and under, 60 percent desired a virtual interaction with their physician.

Some of the complaints from cautious physicians revolve around the complexity and cost of technology hardware and software and the difficulties in merging new platforms into existing operations, particularly syncing virtual experiences with current EHR systems. Ongoing design improvements in the technology and simpler user interfaces are driving down cost and simplifying required functions. The reality today is that telemedicine improves the bottom line for most medical practices while reducing appointment management and patient flow issues.

As legislatures across the country continue to make progress on modifying existing regulatory barriers and concerns involving payment parity, payer participation and individual state licensing and credentialing, many early telemedicine supporters are beginning to see the light at the end of the increased adoption tunnel. For those providers who continue to resist the trends of virtual medical technology, the time is nearing to overcome the natural tendency to resist and fear change. The simple truth is patients prefer and want telehealth choices and the technology is here to stay.