AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


AcuteCare Telemedicine Turns 3!

This October marks the third anniversary of AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT). Over the course of its first three years, ACT has grown considerably during a period of significant change in the policy and industry of healthcare in America. The 4 Board Certified partners of ACT have retained a steady focus on their mission of filling a growing need for 24/7 neurology coverage.

Telemedicine has proven to be a burgeoning facet of the healthcare industry, with technological advancements and enhanced communications allowing providers to extend their reach over geographical boundaries to patients in need while simultaneously streamlining the healthcare delivery process and reducing associated financial and environmental costs. ACT has worked hard to stay ahead of the curve, offering the most cutting-edge solutions for saving lives in cases of neurological emergency.

Entering its fourth year of providing this expert neurological consultation via telemedicine technology to rural and underserved medical facilities throughout the Southeast, ACT looks forward to continued growth. As teleneurology continues to garner attention from hospitals as a practical and effective solution to neurologist staffing needs, the outlook for the company this year and beyond is extremely positive. “The message of ACT has really started to take hold in the healthcare community, and as our efforts for finding new hospital partners ramp up, we are optimistic that we will ultimately be able to reach even more patients with and offer them the level of care they deserve,” says Dr. Lisa Johnston, Partner, ACT.

“Following our rebrand of the company in 2011, we have stayed dedicated to our values as expert practitioners and our vision as a business,” adds Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “The standard of service we have been able to provide has only climbed higher. We are truly passionate about combating morbidity and mortality rates of acute stroke, right here at home in the Stroke Belt (a region of the Southeastern US with higher-than average stroke rates) and beyond.”

Hard work and diligence is paying off for the partners of ACT. As the group continues to practice neurology full time and commit themselves to reaching more patients in 2013, they hope to add to an already impressive list of achievements and accolades throughout their short history.

 



Yes America, Time IS Brain

“Time is brain” is such a frequently repeated mantra of stroke neurologists that it seems almost to have become cliché. For more than a decade, fliers, lectures and even billboards have been admonishing us to get to the hospital immediately when we develop symptoms of stroke such as speech trouble or weakness. The longer a stroke victim goes without treatment, the more brain damage accrues and the greater the likelihood of permanent disability or death. Using the latest methods to restore flow to blocked arteries, neurologists can improve the outcomes of stroke victims beyond anything imagined before the “Decade of the Brain.” 

It was distressing to be called recently to see Sam, a 55 year old, via teleneurology consultation. Sam had fallen at home around midnight. When his wife noticed his complete paralysis on the left side, she wanted to call the EMS. However, he refused to let her do so and dragged himself to bed. When he was no better by the morning, they came to the ER more than 12 hours after the stroke started. Sam’s arrival to the hospital was far too late; the damage was complete. He was unable to even wiggle his toes or fingers on the left side, and was suffering severe left facial weakness.

Unless clot busting medicine is given or a clot is physically removed from a blocked artery within a window of just a few hours, brain cells die without exception. The struggle against time to save brain capacity is an uphill battle. Rather than facing a prospect for a good recovery and being able to walk or dance again, Sam is now likely to remain under nursing care for years to come.

Contrast Sam’s story with that of Britt, a young college student who suddenly found himself unable to move or speak while at home. His family also immediately recognized the signs of stroke, but unlike Sam, Britt was brought to the ER quickly. A study of his brain revealed the blocked artery and Britt soon underwent a procedure to open it. Within a day’s time, he was back to normal, his brain cells recovering when oxygenated blood returned after the artery was opened.

Today, Britt can look forward to decades of normal living. Sam? His fateful decision to ignore serious symptoms and go back to bed has cost him his freedom. Regardless of clichés, Time is Brain. The urgency of timely diagnosis and treatment in cases of stroke cannot be understated.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Discusses the Future of Teleneurology at GPT Conference

Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) will speak during the 2012 Georgia Partnership for Telehealth (GPT) Conference at the Ritz-Carlton, Reynolds Plantation in Lake Oconee, GA on Thursday, March 15th. The annual conference brings together physicians, nurses, and other industry figures to address a wide variety of topics related to telehealth, including recent innovations, advocacy and education, policies and regulations, and case studies.

Dr. Gwynn will discuss the potential of teleneurology in this decade. ACT is a leader in teleneurology services, dedicated to bringing high quality neurological care to underserved areas through the use of telemedicine technologies.

“Significant advances in technology are presently writing the next chapter of medical history. As futurists who see the possibilities and value of telemedicine, specifically teleneurology, ACT is truly on the forefront of this movement,” said Gwynn. “The GPT Conference is a fantastic opportunity to exchange knowledge with other industry leaders who share the same vision. Events such as this move us closer to a future where patients have access to the best possible care, regardless of their location.”

More information about GPT and the 2012 Conference can be accessed at http://www.gatelehealth.org/index.php/2011-conference/2012-conference/.



Georgia Teleneurology Rebrands as AcuteCare Telemedicine

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), an Atlanta-based healthcare provider specializing in treatment of acute strokes in underserved hospitals, launched a new brand as it gains market share in the industry.   AcuteCare, formerly Georgia Teleneurology (GTN), has pursued its mission of providing high-quality emergency neurological care via remote presence to Georgia hospitals lacking 24/7 coverage since September 2009.

The company rebranded in June 2011, officially changing its name to AcuteCare Telemedicine maintaining its uncompromising dedication to deliver the highest quality of neurological care to those it serves.  ACT is positioned to become a nationwide leader in the practice of telemedicine.

ACT’s success is largely due to the 4 partners who happen to be board certified neurologists with over 50 years of combined experience.  Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Dr. Lisa Johnston, Dr. James Kiely, and Dr. Keith Sanders have a proven track record managing patients with neurological emergencies, particularly acute stroke, via remote presence technology.  As a result, ACT has contributed to improved patient outcomes.

“We are excited about the launch of our new brand reflective of our personality,” comments Dr. Kiely. “Our mission and intention is clear.  ACT is driving force in the industry, known for quality and commitment to our craft.  The rebrand is a component of that.”

As the landscape of medicine continues to evolve, the need for acute neurological care 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year is critical.  In addition to increased patient benefit, ACT also provides an opportunity for hospitals to serve acute neurological patients, ultimately impacting revenue growth.

To learn more about ACT, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.