AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


The Georgia Partnership for Telehealth Spring Conference

The Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth (GPT) was founded on the advances in the continually evolving telecommunications technologies. Since its formation in 2008, GPT has grown to become one of the most robust, comprehensive telehealth networks in the nation. The hallmark of GPT is the Georgia Telemedicine Program, an Open Access Network, which is a web of statewide access points based on strategicGPT Image partnerships with successful existing Telemedicine programs, and the creation of new Telemedicine locations, to maximize opportunities for timely specialty services. When fully realized, the Program will enable all rural Georgians to access specialty care within 30 miles of their homes. GPT’s services and support can provide state of the art telehealth solutions for all Georgians.

On March 25, 2015 GPT will be sponsoring their 6th Annual Spring Conference in Savannah, GA. The conference is a great opportunity for healthcare professionals from all medical disciplines and specialties to learn how the most up-to-date telecommunications technologies are impacting the delivery of stroke care and other healthcare services. Attendees will experience telemedicine in an applied framework, build network relationships and gain exposure to the latest in telehealth hardware and software technology. The conference will include a Grant Writing Workshop and will feature presentations from foremost experts in teleneurology.

Dr. Keith A. Sanders will be presenting a talk at the conference entitled “Outcome Analysis Demonstrates the Value of Telestroke”. Dr. Sanders is Director and Founder of the Stroke Center of St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta and former Chairman of the Ethics Resource Committee and a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C. and AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT). “As medical practitioners, we are expected to apply the latest techniques and technologies to the treatment of our patients. However, it is incumbent upon us to analyze the outcomes to gauge whether there are meaningful benefits and share that knowledge with the greater medical community. Indeed, state-of-the-art telemedicine technology is advancing stroke care and saving lives,” says Dr. Sanders. “I’m looking forward to sharing my experiences improving outcomes and expanding access to quality, advanced stroke care with my fellow Conference attendees.”

The GPT Spring Conference will begin on March 25, 2015 and run through March 27, at the Hyatt Regency-Savannah at 2 West Bay Street, Savannah GA 31401. Online registration is now open. An array of exhibitor opportunities is now available. Additional information is available by contacting Samantha Haas at samantha.wainright@gatelehealth.org.



New Partnerships Bring Telemedicine to Guatemala

Recently the Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth (GPT), the Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSU) and Casa Para Ninos Aleluya (CASA) launched its first international telemedicine program. The new partnership was formed through an ongoing relationship with former Louisiana Senator and Family Medicine Practitioner, Dr. Donald Hines and GPT’s Chief Executive Officer, Paula Guy.

The mission of the collaboration is to deliver much needed primary and specialized medical care to the children of the CASA orphanage through the use of telemedicine technology.  The orphanage is home to over 400 abused, orphaned and mistreated children and is located just outside of Guatemala City.  Started in 1988 by missionaries Mike and Dottie Clark, CASA’s vision is for the kids they serve to have a chance in life by bringing pediatric specialty care to the clinic in order to change the futures of these children and so many more.  The medical needs of hundreds of the children at CASA are met daily through a few nurses that manage a clinic on-site.  The new technology will greatly aid the on-site care givers capabilities in providing quality medical care to the children. The new technology has become a magnet for other missions who are struggling to serve the estimated 200,000 orphaned children across Guatemala.

The clinic was up and online within 24 hours and the nursing staff at CASA was trained and certified as telemedicine presenters and will be supported by Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth as they continue to serve Cuidad de Los Ninos.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals in the southeast United States, recently donated their time and expertise to make telemedicine a reality at CASA.  Dr. James M. Kiely, a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C., ACT and Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at Northside Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta recently demonstrated the benefits of telemedicine capabilities at the orphanage.

Dr. Kiely remotely treated a 19 year old CASA patient with a history of intractable epilepsy. The young patient was on numerous medications but continued to experience recurring seizures. By using a high definition audio-visual connection provided by GPT, Dr. Kiely was able to interview the patient’s parents and examine the patient remotely. The imaging results, hemiparesis, and description of seizures allowed him to determine that the likely type and cause was attributed to porencephaly, the failure for one hemisphere of the brain to develop. Kiely was able to recommend appropriate medications to on-site doctors and to suggest additional steps to take if the patients epilepsy remained intractable.  The process worked flawlessly and marked the beginning of a new relationship between the missions and medical providers across the region.

Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth has aligned its mission to serve domestically and internationally and is seeing lives change through getting access to care in these underserved areas. There are no limits in providing this kind of access worldwide using technology,” states Dr. Jeffrey Kesler, COO of GPT.  The Partnership’s experience in implementing Telemedicine includes nursing homes, school clinics, correction, specialty clinics, Emergency Department, ICU, stroke assessment, primary care, child advocacy, and continuing education.

GPT will be providing ongoing support to the children of the Guatemala region through donated physician time. Physicians, who are interested in investing time to serve at CASA Para Ninos Aleluya, are encouraged to contact Matt Jansen, Executive Director, Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth at matt.jansen@gatelehealth.org.



Good Things Come in Small Packages

As the fall approaches and we reach the third anniversary of AcuteCare Telemedicine, we have spent some time reflecting on our company and personal growth over the last three years. From simple beginnings, serving one health care facility in the metro Atlanta area, ACT has expanded to include facilities in rural communities of both Georgia and Tennessee. We have developed alliances with Emory University Hospital and the Georgia Partnership for Teleheath, two partners who enable us to provide the highest quality of acute neurologic care where it may otherwise be lacking. Turning our attention forward, ACT continues to push to ensure that every emergency department is staffed with adequate 24/7 neurology coverage, whether in person or via remote presence.

ACT has always believed that our successes are primarily due to the quality of services we offer. Despite our expansion over the past three years, ACT has remained a small, intimate company, still owned and operated by its four founding physicians. We find unique value in our size; it allows for outstanding continuity of care, frequent “meetings of the minds,” and quick, effective identification of problems and subsequent solutions.

Weekly meetings with all four physicians cultivate innovative ideas, enable problem identification, and facilitate the creation of solutions in a timely and efficient manner, advantages rarely possible in larger corporations. Thanks to the size of the company, each physician of ACT has a specific role, but can be flexible and share duties when needed, strengthening the consistency of the quality care we provide.

Being smaller has other rewards. In the world of acute neurological emergencies, there is little time for complex communication and red tape. When problems or concerns arise at any of our serviced facilities, an ACT physician can immediately make contact remotely and work directly with a facility member on issue resolution. Try calling up the CEO of your car’s manufacturer when your check engine light comes on.

The four physician-owners of ACT continue to practice neurology in a group that has been caring for patients for more than 65 years combined. We are highly trusted neurologists in our own community, and we are committed to bringing our expertise to other communities in need. Our small size ensures that we will stay focused on keeping our standards high and our integrity intact along the way.



Philanthropy at Work

Aiming to improve the quality of healthcare delivery in a critical region of the United States, the Amerigroup Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Amerigroup Corp., is providing a $50,000 grant to improve access to care in rural areas of Georgia. The grant was presented to the Georgia Partnership for Telehealth (GPT), an organization working to provide specialized healthcare services in underserved parts of the state through the use of telemedicine.

Georgia is part of a group of states in the southeast US comprising what is known in neurology circles as the ‘Stroke Belt,’ or ‘Stroke Alley,’ named for citizens’ propensity toward higher risk and morbidity of stroke due to several lifestyle factors. One such factor for elevated risk is larger ‘desert’ areas where rural residents do not live within an acceptable distance of a facility where they can receive proper treatment in cases of stroke. Funding programs such as this most recent grant by the Amerigroup Foundation can mean tremendous strides toward building the awareness and infrastructure needed to correct these less-than-ideal conditions, including instating telemedicine programs to eliminate the obstacle of distance between patient and doctor.

Teleneurology brings technology and expertise that are incredibly powerful tools in the fight against stroke. With time so precious, telemedicine programs are saving the lives of rural dwellers who previously had extremely limited options. The partners of AcuteCare Telemedicine are pleased to see the patronage of organizations concerned with creating better, more accessible care being put to good use.