AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Minority Communities May Benefit Most from mhealth Technology

Mobile Health (mHealth) is the newest entrant in the world of telemedicine.  Delivery of health services by way of mobile, smart phones is promising to be a quickly expanding healthcare delivery device and minority communities may be the segment of population that will benefit the most from the technology.  The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies recently released a report entitled “Minorities, Mobile Broadband, and the Management of Chronic Diseases,” which evaluates the vast potential of mobile broadband technologies to help address our nation’s most pressing health concerns.

Diabetes, heart disease, cancer, arthritis, and obesity claim the lives of 7 out every 10 Americans each year and these chronic diseases affect minority communities disproportionately, with many individuals lacking the ability to effectively treat and monitor their health due to geographic, financial, cultural and linguistic barriers.  mHealth may be the answer to breaking down barriers to minorities receiving treatment for these chronic conditions.  With more than 63 percent of the minority population having access to mobile devices like smartphones and “pads”, equipping them with functionally relevant mobile applications can enhance the doctor-patient communication and empower patients to make informed healthcare decisions.

Some of the report’s policy recommendations include:

  • Ensure universal access to mobile broadband for households in both un-served and underserved areas.
  • Reform regulatory barriers that limit the use of non-traditional medical treatment.
  • Create incentives for physicians to use mobile broadband-enabled technologies for current and preventative care.
  • Avoid excessive and regressive taxation on wireless goods and services.

According to the latest industry data available, there are presently 31,000 health, fitness, and medical related apps on the market, and the rate of new introductions is growing rapidly. According to Washington, D.C.-based eHealth Initiative, the number of smart phone apps increased 120% during the past year alone and while there are hundreds of the apps that really work and are completely legitimate, the medical community has legitimate concern about many of the products safety and effectiveness.

Patients, physicians, and the vast mHealth community are profoundly optimistic about the future of health apps in bringing much needed medical care to those who suffer from chronic illnesses, not only in the minority communities but the increasingly aging population as well.



Mobile Healthcare and Monitoring on the Brink of Revolution

Wireless in-home health monitoring is expected to increase six-fold in the next four years. A recent study by InMedica indicates that 308,000 patients were remotely monitored by their healthcare provider for congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, hypertension, and mental health conditions worldwide in 2012. While congestive heart failure accounts for the majority of remote monitoring, it is expected that diabetes will supplant COPD with the second largest share of telehealth patients by 2017.  It is predicted that more than 1.8 million people worldwide will utilize mobile monitoring in the next four years.

Telemedicine is seen as a significant tool among healthcare providers for reducing hospital readmission rates, track patients chronic disease progression or provide advanced specialized medical treatment to patients in remote areas.  Four main factors are driving the demand for increased use of telemedicine and telehealth; Federal Readmission penalties introduced by the U.S. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS);  healthcare providers desires to increase ties to patients and improve quality of care; insurance providers who are looking to increase their competitiveness and reduce in-patient pay-outs by working directly with telehealth suppliers to monitor their patient base; and an anticipation for future increased demand for telehealth services by patients.

Of the billions of dollars spent on health care each year, 75% to 80% of it goes for patients with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma and Alzheimer’s disease.  With rising costs and the anticipated shortage of physicians and healthcare providers over the next decade, utilizing the telemedicine technologies is becoming increasingly important to the routine delivery of medical services and monitoring of chronic diseases.

Even telepsychiatry, the use of secure Web-based video conferencing technology, and ambulatory patients, those who have been diagnosed with a disease at an ambulatory care facility but have not been hospitalized are expected to experience significant increased utilization of telemedicine among healthcare professionals in the next four years.  A plethora of emerging mobile technology, such as wearable wireless monitors to smartphone attachments will offer consumers the ability to track everything from core vital signs to impending heart attacks by discovering problems with heart tissue are on the horizon, offering a revolution in digital medical technology.

Speaking to those resisting the new mobile technology, Dr. Eric Topol, a professor of genomics at the Scripps Research Institute, recently encouraged the medical community to end paternal medicine, where only the physician has access to healthcare information, and to embark on a new beginning where patients own their data.  Dr. Topol compared the new mobile technology to the Gutenberg press and the way it revolutionized the way information was shared throughout the world.

We are embarking into a new era where patients have the mobile tools to better enable them to participate in their own medical diagnoses and treatment.