AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Continuity of Care in Telemedicine

Continuity of care is a fundamental factor in the delivery of quality healthcare and a bedrock principle of the patient-doctor relationship. It is understood to be a critical element in all health care systems and has shown to be responsible for reducing hospitalizations and lowering costs, particularly among chronically ill patients.

Traditionally, continuity of care is the delivery of a “seamless service through integration, coordination and the sharing of information between different providers.” The increasing complexity of healthcare delivery is complicating the assurance of continuity of care. Virtual interactions between patient and caregiver and a plethora of health related monitors, devises and mobile apps, has some believing the increasing complexity in healthcare delivery might impede the achievement of continuity of care. Even in a traditional face-to-face care relationship, it is common to have more than one care provider across the process of diagnosis and treatment. Add options like retail clinics, e-visit websites, smartphone apps, freestanding urgent care centers and kiosks and continuity of care could be compromised by all the disruptive innovation.

For this reason much debate about telemedicine and the effect it is imposing on healthcare delivery has been centered on the doctor/patient relationship and the adherence to maintaining a high standard of care, regardless of the method of interaction. While the importance of the patient and physician in the new electronic relationship is well understood, there is a third component essential to the successful integration of telemedicine. The ability to access patient’s medical information is critical to extending continuity of care for patients as well as improving transparency between telemedicine providers and healthcare organizations.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services for healthcare organizations for stroke and other neurological care, is providing technology enabled services to healthcare providers for the delivery of high-quality clinical care virtually anywhere, anytime. ACT has been on the forefront of the use of this technology for years, remotely delivering live and interactive Telestroke and other Teleneurology assessments to patients at hospitals and emergency medical centers throughout the nation. At Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute in Richmond, Virginia, Patricia Lane comments on their collaboration with ACT, “I just love the technology and clinical solutions platform. It allows for continuity in communications from doctor to doctor and permits the real-time sharing of information between care-givers. Our ultimate goal is to provide a better treatment plan for each patient.”

Integrating telemedicine connections into a secure electronic medical record system designed with familiar digital formats, functions and cutting edge security measures in order to ensure the highest level of patient confidentiality will be essential to insuring quality and continuity of care and answer much of the concern over the new disruptive healthcare delivery model.



Investing in People

Telemedicine has garnered more attention as of late as a truly game-changing emerging field on the cutting edge of healthcare. Perceptions of the field have become increasingly favorable, but there is still a long road ahead to becoming part of the mainstream lexicon of medicine for patients and providers.

Presently, one of the most significant barriers to entry for new companies in telemedicine is the level of investment required on the part of potential client facilities. Revolutionary technology does not typically come cheap, and as healthcare spending continues to swell (albeit at a slower rate than previously), most facilities are working diligently to combat rising costs rather than add new programs to already bloated budgets.

The good news is that practical new technologies, regardless of how disruptive or expensive at the outset, have a habit of eventually finding their way into adoption. A common adage proclaims that every few years, the power of technology doubles and its price tag is halved. This implies that facilities which have temporarily chosen to forego the extensive advantages that telemedicine programs offer based upon steep startup costs will ultimately find the same solutions to be far more cost effective in the not-too-distant future. However, late adopters of telemedicine services do run the risk of losing their competitive edge. This is especially true in light of the rapid changes ahead in the healthcare landscape; the integration of telemedicine can make a hospital more independent of, or attractive to, consolidation by larger healthcare systems, depending on the goals of the client.

When considering teleneurology as a discipline in particular, hospitals must recognize that an investment in telemedicine is far more than an investment in the newest, best equipment; it is the foundation of a relationship with physicians who are among the most knowledgeable and experiences practitioners in their field. AcuteCare Telemedicine is truly technology- agnostic, meaning that regardless of the price tag of the machines that we leverage to connect with a facility’s patients or staff, a partnership with our physicians means that behind the machinery is the expertise needed to drastically improve the quality of care a patient can receive. We place value in finding quality tools to accomplish our mission, but our accessibility is by no means restricted by them.

Many healthcare leaders are still hesitant to make the investment in something new, but the time has come that the highest level of expert care be available to everyone, everywhere. It is our vision that hospital facilities will share in our agnosticism towards technology and invest in the people who will improve healthcare’s next generation.