AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Leading Centers Aiming to Revolutionize Stroke Research

Georgia StrokeNet will be one of 25 U.S. regional coordinating centers to take aim at revolutionizing stroke research under a program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Georgia StrokeNet is the only regional coordinating center in Georgia that is participating in the project that is funded by a five-year, $2 million grant.

Those taking part in the collaboration include: Emory University’s School of Medicine, Grady Memorial Hospital’s Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center and other local partners. Emory neurology professor and Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center Director Dr. Michael Frankel will serve as Georgia StrokeNet’s principal investigator: Dr. Frankel says, “The new StrokeNet will be a conduit for clinical trials for patients to participate in, so we can answer those key questions about what is the best way to prevent a stroke, what the right blood pressure to try to prevent a stroke, what is the right treatment for a patient who has an acute stroke.”

Grady Hospital’s Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center has earned a top designation for stroke care by an independent accrediting agency for health care organizations. The Center has been designated an Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center by the Joint Commission and is one of 50 U.S. stroke centers who have received the designation since it began. Emory University and Georgia Regents Medical Center in Augusta are the other two Georgia centers to receive the designation.

Dr. Keith A. Sanders, Director and Founder of the Stroke Center of St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta, and partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C., is looking forward to contributing to the stroke research at Georgia StrokeNet.  “The research is important because strokes and stroke-related deaths are prevalent in Georgia and the Southeast. It is hoped that this research will lead to more treatment options to reduce disability from stroke, commented Dr. Sanders.”



Acutecare Telemedicine CEO Featured Speaker For American Heart Association’s Stroke Webinar Series

Dr. Matthews Gwynn, CEO of AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), appeared as the featured speaker for a webinar series produced by the southeast affiliate of the American Heart Association. The presentation, entitled “Extending Stroke Care through Telemedicine,” was delivered to several hundred hospital administrators and medical staff throughout the southeast and other areas of the U.S.

Dr. Gwynn’s webinar presentation, hosted by Mary Robicheaux, Vice-President of Quality Improvement for the American Heart Association southeast affiliate, focused on the advancement of teleneurology in the treatment of acute stroke patients. Dr. Gwynn discussed the positive effects that teleneurology continues to have on advancing stroke treatment, such as the increased use of the clot-disolving medication tPA (tissue plasminogen activator), as well more advanced neuro-interventional procedures known as thrombectomies, performed by neuro-interventionalists at such world-class facilities like Grady Hospital’s Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center in Atlanta, GA.

“Advanced treatments for acute stroke cases are becoming more and more prevalent with the advent of greater technology and treatment procedures,” stated Dr. Gwynn.  “The medical community observed this within the cardiology field over the past couple of decades, and now we are starting to see similar advancements in stroke care via neurocritical care and interventional neuroradiology.

In a continued effort to expand teleneurology in the southeast, Dr. Gwynn and the other neurologists of ACT serve as critical evaluators at partner hospitals of stroke cases that may require advanced interventions such as those discussed in the webinar.

For more information about AcuteCare Telemedicine, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.