AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


If “What” is the Point and “How” Gets Us to the Point, Does “Why” Really Matter?

Achievement of any goal or objective begins with the question: What’s the point?  The answer to the initial question sets forth the purpose for implementing an effort to move forward to an end, or an objective. How is the strategic means to achieving the objective and if the journey is successfully achieved, does it really matter “why” we set out on the mission from the beginning?

In a recent article by Ty Montague, CEO and co-founder of co: and author of “True Story: How to Combine Story and Action to Transform Your Business,” he expresses his views on the importance of “why” in terms of storytelling versus storydoing. Storytellers think of a story as the domain of the marketing team. A company’s story is thought to be separate from the corporate strategy and is most often expressed through advertising. Storydoers, on the other hand, think of their story as a strategic asset and a competitive advantage. The narrative of storydoing companies is advanced through every action they take and those companies tend to be on a mission to make the world a better place, a quest that transcends revenue development and maximization. Their customers see and feel this higher goal in everything the company does and it makes them magnetic, creating fierce loyalty in their customers. Leaders and associates of storydoer companies tend to find their work experiences richer and more deeply satisfying and growing evidence suggest that storydoer companies are more efficient businesses that perform better financially over time.

Perhaps the purest example of an industry of Storydoers is those who deliver the broad range healthcare services to their customers, or patients.  Undoubtedly healthcare is a business, a very expansive and lucrative business, and one which requires revenue in excess of cost, or profit, to survive, prosper and prevail in its mission.  But it remains an industry whose practitioners are overwhelmingly called to serve the profession because “why” really, really matters.

Dr. James M. Kiely, a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C., AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) and Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at Northside Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta says, “I am so invigorated when I help a patient and help my Emergency Room (ER) colleagues. We make a real, immediate and meaningful difference every time we do our job. There are few people who can say that about their careers. I don’t like hyperbole but what we get to do every day for a living, rocks!”

“Why” matters.



New Partnerships Bring Telemedicine to Guatemala

Recently the Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth (GPT), the Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSU) and Casa Para Ninos Aleluya (CASA) launched its first international telemedicine program. The new partnership was formed through an ongoing relationship with former Louisiana Senator and Family Medicine Practitioner, Dr. Donald Hines and GPT’s Chief Executive Officer, Paula Guy.

The mission of the collaboration is to deliver much needed primary and specialized medical care to the children of the CASA orphanage through the use of telemedicine technology.  The orphanage is home to over 400 abused, orphaned and mistreated children and is located just outside of Guatemala City.  Started in 1988 by missionaries Mike and Dottie Clark, CASA’s vision is for the kids they serve to have a chance in life by bringing pediatric specialty care to the clinic in order to change the futures of these children and so many more.  The medical needs of hundreds of the children at CASA are met daily through a few nurses that manage a clinic on-site.  The new technology will greatly aid the on-site care givers capabilities in providing quality medical care to the children. The new technology has become a magnet for other missions who are struggling to serve the estimated 200,000 orphaned children across Guatemala.

The clinic was up and online within 24 hours and the nursing staff at CASA was trained and certified as telemedicine presenters and will be supported by Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth as they continue to serve Cuidad de Los Ninos.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals in the southeast United States, recently donated their time and expertise to make telemedicine a reality at CASA.  Dr. James M. Kiely, a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C., ACT and Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at Northside Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta recently demonstrated the benefits of telemedicine capabilities at the orphanage.

Dr. Kiely remotely treated a 19 year old CASA patient with a history of intractable epilepsy. The young patient was on numerous medications but continued to experience recurring seizures. By using a high definition audio-visual connection provided by GPT, Dr. Kiely was able to interview the patient’s parents and examine the patient remotely. The imaging results, hemiparesis, and description of seizures allowed him to determine that the likely type and cause was attributed to porencephaly, the failure for one hemisphere of the brain to develop. Kiely was able to recommend appropriate medications to on-site doctors and to suggest additional steps to take if the patients epilepsy remained intractable.  The process worked flawlessly and marked the beginning of a new relationship between the missions and medical providers across the region.

Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth has aligned its mission to serve domestically and internationally and is seeing lives change through getting access to care in these underserved areas. There are no limits in providing this kind of access worldwide using technology,” states Dr. Jeffrey Kesler, COO of GPT.  The Partnership’s experience in implementing Telemedicine includes nursing homes, school clinics, correction, specialty clinics, Emergency Department, ICU, stroke assessment, primary care, child advocacy, and continuing education.

GPT will be providing ongoing support to the children of the Guatemala region through donated physician time. Physicians, who are interested in investing time to serve at CASA Para Ninos Aleluya, are encouraged to contact Matt Jansen, Executive Director, Georgia Partnership for TeleHealth at matt.jansen@gatelehealth.org.