AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Stroke Treatment Gets a Boost

Fifty years ago, the only advice medical textbooks gave physicians for someone suffering with a stroke was to put him to bed and keep him comfortable, hoping that with time, the brain would heal as best it could. For 30 years, promising techniques preceded disappointing trials. First, heparin was going to be the savior, and for most of the 70s and 80s, it almost served as a standard, but better studies eventually showed that the treatment was not just worthless, but in reality dangerous, causing more brain hemorrhages than no treatment at all. Later, drugs that were intended to clear out “free radicals” were going to save the ischemic penumbra, part of viable brain tissue around a central core of dead cells, but all studies showed that either the medication didn’t get to the target, didn’t work, or could even be toxic to the brain.

In the mid 90s, tissue plasminogen activator (TPA), long used for heart attack victims to break up the clots inside arteries of the heart, was shown to be effective in doing the same in arteries of the brain. For the first time, physicians had something to offer patients that actually made a difference. About a third of patients who received TPA had better three month outcomes than those that did not. This success rate was quite good, but patients with severe strokes still did not respond as well because, in most cases, thrombi in the large arteries were not effectively dissolved.

Only in the last few years have studies been done to consider the effectiveness of a thrombectomy, the process of physically pulling out a thrombus inside an artery in the brain or neck, The early devices available to physicians are fairly good at the task, but a substantial number of patients continue to suffer from residual blockages of the arteries following the procedure.

A report of clinical trials using two new types of thrombectomy devices, called Solitaire and Trevo Retriever, show both of these new devices as being up to five times more effective than their predecessors in opening up arteries. Advances this drastic are rare in medicine, but physicians should be optimistic about the potential for these instruments in improving outcomes. Provided that patients can have access to skilled practitioners in time, within eight hours or sooner, the treatment of stroke may be about to enter a dramatic new phase.

Stroke is the most serious disabling condition in adults, resulting in hundreds of thousands of permanent injuries and deaths every year. This decade may witness the greatest advances in the history of stroke treatment. There are still further trials to run, but with these exciting new prospects, the importance of stroke neurologists like the doctors of ACT being present in every emergency room, either in person or by remote presence, cannot be overstated.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Turns 3!

This October marks the third anniversary of AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT). Over the course of its first three years, ACT has grown considerably during a period of significant change in the policy and industry of healthcare in America. The 4 Board Certified partners of ACT have retained a steady focus on their mission of filling a growing need for 24/7 neurology coverage.

Telemedicine has proven to be a burgeoning facet of the healthcare industry, with technological advancements and enhanced communications allowing providers to extend their reach over geographical boundaries to patients in need while simultaneously streamlining the healthcare delivery process and reducing associated financial and environmental costs. ACT has worked hard to stay ahead of the curve, offering the most cutting-edge solutions for saving lives in cases of neurological emergency.

Entering its fourth year of providing this expert neurological consultation via telemedicine technology to rural and underserved medical facilities throughout the Southeast, ACT looks forward to continued growth. As teleneurology continues to garner attention from hospitals as a practical and effective solution to neurologist staffing needs, the outlook for the company this year and beyond is extremely positive. “The message of ACT has really started to take hold in the healthcare community, and as our efforts for finding new hospital partners ramp up, we are optimistic that we will ultimately be able to reach even more patients with and offer them the level of care they deserve,” says Dr. Lisa Johnston, Partner, ACT.

“Following our rebrand of the company in 2011, we have stayed dedicated to our values as expert practitioners and our vision as a business,” adds Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “The standard of service we have been able to provide has only climbed higher. We are truly passionate about combating morbidity and mortality rates of acute stroke, right here at home in the Stroke Belt (a region of the Southeastern US with higher-than average stroke rates) and beyond.”

Hard work and diligence is paying off for the partners of ACT. As the group continues to practice neurology full time and commit themselves to reaching more patients in 2013, they hope to add to an already impressive list of achievements and accolades throughout their short history.