AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


SAMC Recognized For Outstanding Stroke Care

The Southern Alabama Medical Center (SAMC’s) Stroke Care Network was recently named “Partner of Year” at the Alabama Rural Stroke Award Health and Telehealth Summit.  The award was presented by the Alabama Partnership for Telehealth (APT) during the October summit in Prattville. Jason DeLeon, MD, Emergency Medicine; Cecilia Land, division director SAMC Rehabilitation Services and Levonne Outlaw, SAMC Stroke Network Coordinator accepted the award.

“This is an award that we give out to the partner who we feel has done the most outstanding job when it comes to not only using, but advancing telemedicine,” said Lloyd Sirmons, executive director of APT.  “SAMC has done a great job, not only building their program, but advancing telemedicine in the state of Alabama.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the Southeast region’s largest practice based telemedicine provider, joined in collaboration with SAMC earlier this year to remotely diagnose and treat acute care neurological patients and to offer advanced cost-effective solutions that deliver improved stroke patient outcomes throughout the expanded SAMC Network of participating hospitals.  The SAMC Stroke Care Network ensures that patients in surrounding rural communities have access to the most experienced stroke care available. “SAMC sets the standard in the state when it comes to providing stroke care in rural areas,” said Dr. DeLeon.

On hand to present the award were Matthews Gwynn, MD, Acute Care Telemedicine, SAMC TeleNeurology Providers; Lloyd Sirmons, Alabama Partnership for Telehealth; Ron Sparks, Alabama Department of Rural Development and David White, Alabama Governor’s Office.



Telemedicine in the Wake of Natural Disaster

As October 2012 came to a close, the arrival of Hurricane Sandy served as a haunting reminder that we can never underestimate the destructive and disruptive power of nature. The “superstorm” wreaked havoc on some of the most populous areas in the United States, not just causing billions in physical damage, but severely testing our infrastructure and its vital role in our society.

Considering the major implications that storms or other disaster events on this scale have for the healthcare industry, the days leading up to, during, and following Sandy were a demanding exercise in preparation, planning, and execution. The storm left countless citizens in need of medical attention, and threatened the adequate treatment of those already receiving care.

As one major resource put under the stresses of a disaster-level storm, hospitals and other healthcare facilities quickly became incapacitated by overcrowding, understaffing, a broken supply chain, and in select cases, power failures that crippled essential equipment. A small contingency of Mobile ERs were dispatched across the region, but a lack of pure manpower hindered the effectiveness of the efforts. Despite their mobility, the interrupted transportation systems within the affected communities prevented many from reaching the help they sorely needed.

Telehealth is an ideal candidate for addressing the challenges of these kinds of circumstances. The infrastructure of telemedicine is capable of delivering expert direction and attentive care to victims of natural disasters. The question of manpower becomes a negligible issue, as doctors and other respondents can call in from anywhere, and thanks to ever increasing internet access, the reach of the care administration is not limited by the victims’ location.

If emergency management agencies and telecommunications service providers are willing to work hand in hand with healthcare professionals, we now have the tools and knowledge to ensure that in future disaster scenarios, people can always have the support they need.