AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine Achieves Its Potential for Parkinson’s Patients

Ask any patient suffering from chronic disease and they often will tell a story of isolation, uncertainty and frustration over the debilitating effects of their disease. Many times the focus of their complaints is not being afforded easy access to specialized care and consultation with caregivers. While significant inroads have been made in the treatment options for chronic maladies like Diabetes and Parkinson’s disease, gaining routine, daily access to those ground breaking discoveries is out of the reach of many sufferers.

Researchers are looking at how modern communication technology, coupled with the latest techniques in treating Parkinson disease, can revolutionize the quality of care for sufferers of the chronic neurological disorder. “We are looking at quality of life, quality of care and reducing the burden on healthcare providers”, says Dr. Ray Dorsey, co-director of the Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics at the University of Rochester (N.Y.) Medical Center. “Imagine if you thought there was a possibility you had Parkinson’s disease, but you lived 100 miles or more from the nearest medical center with a qualified neurologist. You’re faced with at least a couple of hours of driving, of navigating an unfamiliar urban environment, of parking and walking—and that’s assuming you’re able to find a neurologist within driving distance to begin with. Now think about how easy it is to buy a book or a pair of shoes online. The two should not be so different.”

Preliminary results of the Connect.Parkinson project, the nation’s first randomized clinical trial of remote treatment of Parkinson’s disease, indicate the benefits of virtual treatment for patients and caregivers alike. A recent report on the initial results of the 18-state, Connect.Parkinson project reported that 95 percent of Parkinson’s patients completing telehealth visits have experienced an increased proportion of the time with a healthcare professional of 89 percent; up from 25 percent for those opting for traditional in-person encounters.

The National Parkinson Foundation is committed to supporting efforts to demonstrate how telemedicine can enhance the delivery of care to people with Parkinson’s. Studies are indicating that telemedicine care, often delivered in the patients home, is just as good as care received at a brick and motor medical center. The fact that diagnosing and monitoring the progression of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders is based almost entirely on visual observation makes Parkinson uniquely suited for virtual care technologies. Christopher Goetz, MD, a leading expert on movement disorders and director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Rush University Medical Center says, “Ninety-five percent of the information I gather is visual. Thus, with telemedicine visits where I can see and hear my patient right in front of me on the computer screen, there is no decline in the quality of information I gather.”

Rush is located in the state of Illinois which is among those states not yet mandating payers to provide payments for telemedical services. But according to Dr. Brian Patty, Rush’s chief medical information office and chairman of Rush’s Telemedicine Steering Committee, the Medical Center has several telemedicine pilot projects underway that can likely have significant impact on Parkinson patients.

In New York, researchers at The Rochester Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics, are developing and testing mobile apps that will help Parkinson’s patients track metrics such as dexterity, balance, gait, voice patterns and cognition, then send readings to researchers.

After decades of promises, telemedicine is delivering on its promise to increase access to quality, specialty care to improve patient outcomes.



ACT Expands to Meet the Increasing Demands for Technology-Based Care

ResearchMoz.us recently published the results of new market research study titled ‘Telehealth and Telemedicine Market in HealthCare Industry 2015-2020’ which projects the global telemedicine market to grow 18.5 (CAGR) percent through 2019. It is clear that the healthcare industry is experiencing considerable growth in the use of digital technologies across a wide range of healthcare specialties such as telehealth, telestroke, wireless health monitoring, wearable health devices, and EMR.

One of the earliest adopters of telemedicine continues to advance in popularity with hospitals who seek around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care. As the demand for Neurologists increases, there is a growing shortage of experienced physicians available to provide continuous coverage at many facilities throughout the United States. AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services located in Atlanta, GA was founded in 2009 to help hospitals overcome medical staff obstacles, ER diversion and help improve patient outcomes for stroke and other Neurological conditions. Since the fourth quarter of 2015, ACT has added numerous client hospitals to their expanding network and is responding to the increased demand for these services by adding qualified neurologists to their team.

“We are dedicated to preserving and strengthening our reputation as leaders in the field of telestroke care and continue to be fully committed to serve the needs of both our patients and client hospitals in a manner that is personal and highly professional,” says James M. Kiely, ACT Partner.

ACT is experiencing an impressive performance by demonstrating its values of integrity, transparency, accountability, collaboration and expertise. Matthews W. Gwynn, CEO, and ACT Partner comments, “We’ve set the standard of care for teleneurology and acute stroke care. We also believe in the importance of remaining technology agnostic and agile, permitting our client hospitals and enterprise-level systems to select the specific technology that best fits the needs of their respective facilities.”

The growing firm is also focused on results, continuously measuring performance across all of the healthcare organizations it serves to identify how to improve the process so as to positively impact patient outcomes. “We are one of the only telestroke providers publishing data centered on the success of our program,” says Lisa H. Johnston, ACT Partner. “We’re proud of setting a standard for other providers to follow.” The study, titled “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals”, was published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases and authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS. The results indicate that a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network.

“ACT has developed a model of telestroke care that many of our competitors aren’t able to replicate,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “Our results prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable. As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care.”



The Importance of Measuring Performance

Telestroke, the use of communication technology to remotely treat victims of acute stroke, continues to grow and has entered the mainstream of care in an ever evolving and increasingly disruptive healthcare delivery model. Like all medical innovations, telestroke must demonstrate successful outcomes to achieve sustained growth and acceptance. Merely asserting that telemedicine is faster, employs the latest technology, or promotes a better use of limited re-sources is laudable but insufficient.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care, understands the importance of evaluating and documenting telestroke performance. In their recently published study “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” the authors reveal that a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency.

“Success in our business isn’t just about adding new healthcare organizations to our client portfolio,’ says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, co-author and ACT partner. “As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care and improving patient outcomes. This study is representative of our ongoing commitment to serve as a leader in telestroke care, establishing a standard of care and a model that supports the positive growth of telestroke programs across the country.”

As virtual health initiatives continue to move forward, new and valuable trends and telehealth technology solutions will continue to emerge. Traditional methods of delivering medical care will be challenged and disrupted at medical facilities, physicians’ offices and hospitals. Dr. Keith Sanders, ACT Partner and co-author comments, “It is critical to prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable.”

For more information on how AcuteCare Telemedicine can assist you with acute stroke care, contact us!



Robots and Doctors Help Improve Stroke Treatment

The issue of delivering consistent medical care across all geographic areas from large populated urban centers to the outlying rural communities has been a critical area of focus for healthcare organizations. Typically smaller, financially stressed rural hospitals and clinics suffer from limited access to medical specialists, particularly in emergency situations involving stroke and other neurological and coronary events. These medical emergencies demanded quick and immediate treatment to save the affected patient from significant disability or death.

In the three years since the first telestroke robot was installed at Covenant Health Hospitals in East Tennessee, doctors at LeConte Medical Center (LMC) have used the technology on a weekly basis. Using the latest in virtual presence technology the dedicated medical professionals at LMC can connect immediately with a team of neurological specialists at AcuteCare Telemedicine in Atlanta, GA. “It’s an amazing thing that we have this expertise in a small rural hospital,” said Steve Dronen, M.D., Emergency Room at LeConte Medical Center. While the hospital has a well demonstrated history of providing quality care to stroke patients, the extra advantage of having highly trained and experienced neurological specialist available for consultation around the clock, 24/7 assures LMC patients the highest level of stroke care available anywhere in the country.

Dr. James Kiely, a partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C. and AcuteCare Telemedicine said, “As Medical Director of the Neurophysiology Departments at St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta I was aware of how fortunate our patients were to have the most immediate lifesaving treatment for stroke 24 hours a day, seven days a week.” The most effective stroke care requires that it be delivered to the patient within the “golden window” of stroke onset. With stroke being the number four cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States, lack of access to neurologists who specialize in stroke care threatens to deprive many patients the best chance of recovery after a stroke. “AcuteCare Telemedicine was created”, Dr. Kiely says, “to impact the well-being of patients with severe neurological emergencies who otherwise wouldn’t have rapid access to vital expertise simply because of where they live.”

The other major benefit of the technology, described by Dr. S. Arthur Moore, Medical Director of Stroke Program at Covenant Health’s Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center, is how quickly the tele-robot allows doctors to make life-saving decisions. “We can now do something about it. It doesn’t matter if you are in rural East Tennessee or in Knoxville, we can provide the same care,” said Dr. Moore. Doctors only have a small window of time to make a treatment decision before the damage from stroke becomes permanent. The new technology is helping to accelerate the treatment process.



Telemedicine Creates Opportunities to Improve Access to Neurologists

Discussions over an impending shortage of doctors in America are nothing new. The debate and predictions of an increasing shortage of general practitioners, neurologists, radiologists and other medical specialties has raged for nearly a decade. A study by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), a lobby for medical schools and teaching hospitals, said “the doctor shortage is real” with total physician demand projected to grow by up to 17 percent as a population of baby boomers ages. The nation’s shortage of doctors may rise to between 46,000 and 90,000 by 2025. “The doctor shortage is worse than most people think,” says Steven Berk, M.D., dean of the School of Medicine at Texas Tech University. “The population is getting older, so there’s a greater need for physicians. At the same time, physicians are getting older, too, and they’re retiring earlier,” Berk says.

Neurology is one specialty impacted by the shortage. With stroke being the number four cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States, lack of access to neurologists who specialize in stroke care threatens to deprive many patients the best chance of surviving the effects of stroke. More than 800,000 strokes occur in the United States each year and the number of strokes is expected to grow significantly due to a growing elderly population. The need to encourage more young physicians to specialize in stroke is critical.

Dr. Harold P. Adams, Jr., of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and Dr. Jose Biller, of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine believes, “Unless the number of neurologists focusing their careers on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with cerebrovascular diseases increases, a professional void will develop, leaders of professional neurology associations “need to develop and vigorously support a broad range of initiatives to encourage residents to enter vascular neurology. These efforts need to be started immediately. Time is short.”

Other experts believe that new technologies may hasten the response to the pending crisis and may extend the reach of medicine in ways that will address the problem. Health care professionals can serve more people by using telemedicine technologies to examine, treat and monitor patients remotely as well as providing patients increased access to advanced stroke care. These technologies are already keeping patients out of hospitals and doctors’ offices and providing improved recovery results. Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services, has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographic boundaries. AcuteCare CEO, Dr. Matthews Gwynn says, “Increasing access to stroke specialists requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. Technology affords healthcare organizations the ability to select a platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters while extending the highest quality of neurological care to the patients they serve.”

Telestroke is one of the most adopted forms of telemedicine, providing solutions to healthcare providers looking for 24/7 neurology coverage for patients. “Telestroke is filling a gap in terms of the speed and accuracy of stroke diagnosis and start of critical therapy, says Lee Schwamm, vice chair of the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and director of the hospital’s Telestroke and Acute Stroke Services, “Telestroke is the poster child of telemedicine. It’s a really nice example of where the business case is so evident and the benefit to patients is well-documented.”

“The shortage of doctors is definitely impacting the future of medicine,” comments Gwynn. “In response, we remain focused on providing access to quality neurologists to small hospitals in underserved communities as well as to enterprise level healthcare organizations via telemedicine.”



Best Integrated Campaign for Stroke Month Awarded to Bon Secours Richmond

ACT Blog Bonsecour Award

From Left to Right: Bob Silverstein, Enterprise Executive Sales Director, ACT; Dionne Henderson Director of Community & Multi-Cultural Initiatives at American Heart Association, American Stroke Association; Patricia C. Lane MBA, SCRN|Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director Neurosciences, Bon Secours Richmond Health System; Dr. Stacey Epps, Executive Medical Director Bon Secours Virginia Neuroscience Institute.

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recognizes American Stroke Month by focusing on efforts to teach family, friends and coworkers how to recognize the signs of stroke.

This year The American Heart Association awarded Bon Secours Richmond Health System the Best Integrated Campaign Award for 2015. The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia provides full range of services to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth.

Bon Secours is accustomed to taking a leadership role in Neurological care, having established teleneurology initiatives more than five years ago with a goal to have all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. AcuteCare Telemedicine, the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care is collaborating with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries.

Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, AcuteCare Telemedicine, comments, “ACT is aligned with Bon Secours and its ongoing commitment to utilizing the finest and latest technology for the treatment of stroke. This award is evidence of their outstanding efforts to promote a fully integrated stroke program that improves awareness of the dangers of stroke and provides the best in acute stroke care to the communities we serve.”



ACT and Bon Secours Committed to Improving Patient Outcomes

ACT Bob Secour photo1

(Left to Right: Rahul Patel, ACT Data Manager, Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner at ACT, Patricia Lane, Administrative Director Neuroscience at Bon Secours Health System Richmond, Suzanne Doolan, Hospital Systems Manager at Genentech, and Dr. Lisa Johnston, Partner at ACT.)

Atlanta, GA: AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking stroke and other urgent Neurological care, and the Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI) established a collaborative partnership earlier this year to enhance BSNI’s “around the clock” neurological service. ACT and Bon Secours have developed a telemedicine model focused on improving the delivery of care and overall patient outcomes.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals. Bon Secours established its teleneurology program 5 years ago with a goal of having all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. Patricia Lane comments, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours’ efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but an invested team member who takes pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

BSNI patients are the focus and the most important benefactors of this collaboration. Patients are able to receive timely, remote, emergency consultations with AcuteCare Telemedicine neurology specialists. “Our commitment to providing the highest quality of care and ongoing collaboration with BSNI is sure to have a significant impact on the patients and the communities BSNI serves,” say Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT.

ACT hosted Patricia Lane, Administrative Director Neuroscience at Bon Secours Health System Richmond, and Suzanne Doolan, Hospital Systems Manager at Genentech to review stroke treatment processes and patient outcomes. “The advancements in teleneurology not only allow us to access more patients in need of our specialized care, but in providing acute stroke care we are able to improve patient outcomes overall,” commented Sanders. “The success of this collaboration hinges on a seamless execution and a continued effort to evaluate and implement improvements.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine continues to expand its geographic imprint in telestroke care, advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. For more information on how to implement teleneurology services at your healthcare organization, contact ACT. 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.

About Bon Secours Virginia Health System

Bon Secours Virginia provides good help to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth. The not-for-profit health system employs more than 12,500 people, including nearly 800 providers as part of the Bon Secours Medical Group.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopaedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals.

– Bon Secours Richmond is St. Mary’s Hospital, Memorial Regional Medical Center, Richmond Community Hospital, Rappahannock General Hospital and St. Francis Medical Center.

– Bon Secours Hampton Roads is Maryview Medical Center, DePaul Medical Center and Mary Immaculate Hospital. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation

The Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation raises charitable funds to help Bon Secours Virginia Health System address the community’s growing health care needs with compassion and excellence. Through charitable support, we are dedicated to helping create healthy communities, advancing clinical innovation and providing an extraordinary experience of care. For more information on giving, visit www.bsvaf.org.



AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) Exceeds Mid-Year Projections

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services for healthcare organizations seeking around-the-clock stroke and other neurological care, exceeds mid-year projections, adding to its previous 5 years of successive growth.

“As we expand our geographic footprint, ACT has been able to attract enterprise level healthcare systems looking for acute stroke care to support a network of hospitals,” comments Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT.  “Our practice-base model enables us to seamlessly integrate with our client hospitals.”

In March, ACT announced a collaborative partnership with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries. Patricia Lane, Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director of Neurosciences says, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but invested team members who take pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

The American Academy of Neurology reports that stroke is the No. 4 cause of death in the United States and is also a leading cause of disability, creating a shortage of neurologists focused on stroke or acute stroke care.  “With the shortage of neurologists and increased demand for stroke care, especially in rural or underserved communities, ACT works with healthcare organizations to establish teleneurology programs that increase access to critical neurological care,” comments Dr. James Kiely, Partner, ACT. “We remain agile with each client so as to integrate with an existing teleneurology program or assist in establishing a new program, whether a rural hospital or a large healthcare system.”

“We are pleased with the growth of our business and even more excited about the number of hospitals and patients we positively impact,” comments Gwynn.



Do We Risk Getting Lost, Getting There from Here?

For the healthcare industry, this is the year for consumers to leverage new communication technology and the benefits it promised to lower cost and increased access to quality medical care.  Greg Donahue of Benefitspro said, “Telemedicine is becoming a hugely popular health care product, and a great way to connect doctors and medical facilities with patients. Although many people are still not familiar with its application or availability, the medical community is acutely aware of the cost savings and efficacy of providing direct access between the healer and the sick.” And in a recent Harris survey, more than half of American healthcare consumers indicated that they want to use telemedicine to connect with a physician is an indication that providers are in sync with their patients on the subject of telehealth and its impact on developing a new healthcare delivery model.

With a dozen or so state legislature’s and medical boards currently eying legislation and regulations that could, if adopted, remove the barriers to unfettered progress in the expansion of telemedicine nationwide, the discussion now centers, not on the factual merits of telemedicine, but rather on the question; how do we get there, all together, from here? As one watches the process that a few states have been going through in recent weeks, even the most cynical and experienced observers have to be amazed at the variety of results all the individual States efforts have produced. One thing is truly obvious; determining how we all get to the same destination is taking us all over the map.

While one universal theme consistently centers on the premise that practicing telemedicine shall use the same standard of care as if the healthcare services were provided in person, commonality ends there. Some states require face to face encounters between doctor and patient to exist prior to a virtual treatment, some require a previously established doctor patient relationship via in-person or through telecommunication, some require face to face relationships with exceptions for emergency or specialized care and others ban out-right telemedical care without a previous face to face doctor patient relationship. In a few instances, state law makers have gone as far as determining and mandating the specific illnesses that can or cannot be treated via virtual care.

Addressing the rising high cost of healthcare, universal accessibility and the looming threat of a doctor shortage should be a goal shared by all entities with the responsibility to impact and initiate effective solutions to our healthcare crisis. Technology can and will play a significant role in meeting those shared objectives, but only if all stakeholders gravitate towards setting policy that permits some individuality and flexibility but promotes continuity across all existing boundaries such that it does not interfere with the efficient application of that technology.

The journey to removing the barriers to progress is not concluded and the elongated process may, in the end, produce a better set of solutions for all. Collective intentions focused on the creation of a new and better healthcare delivery model for providers and their patients will help is all get there, together, from wherever we are.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Announcing New Partnership with Bon Secours in Collaboration with InTouch Health

 

AcuteCare Telemedicine, the leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care, announces its newest collaborative partnership with Bon Secours Neuroscience Institute (BSNI), the neuroscience division at the not-for-profit Catholic health system sponsored by Bon Secours Ministries.

Bon Secours first established teleneurology initiatives 5 years ago at its smallest hospital, Richmond Community Hospital, with a goal to have all of its area hospitals joint commission certified. Patricia Lane, Bon Secours Richmond Administrative Director of Neurosciences says, “Working with the AcuteCare Telemedicine partners feels like an extension of the internal practice. They are truly in alignment with Bon Secours efforts to identify the right path to create continuity of care from the time the patient is admitted to our Emergency Room to the time they leave the hospital. AcuteCare is not just a provider, but invested team members who take pride in providing the best quality of neurological care to our patients.”

By utilizing innovative telecommunication technology, BSNI patients are able to undergo remote consultation with AcuteCare Telemedicine neurology specialists in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Matthews W. Gwynn, CEO AcuteCare Telemedicine says, “The neurologists of AcuteCare Telemedicine look forward to helping the Richmond and Kilmarnock areas achieve even greater quality in emergency care for their neurological patients through timely, professional medical consultations using the latest advanced communication technology with our partners at InTouch Health.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine is collaborating with InTouch Health to bring 24/7 extended teleneurology services to BSNI. InTouch Health provides technology enabled services to healthcare providers for the delivery of high-quality clinical care virtually anywhere, anytime. The InTouch® Telehealth Network enables healthcare systems to deploy telehealth applications across their enterprise. Patricia Lane comments, “I just love the technology and clinical solutions platform. It allows for continuity in communications from doctor to doctor and permits the real-time sharing of information between care-givers. Our ultimate goal is to provide a better treatment plan for each patient. AcuteCare Telemedicine and InTouch are the right solution to attain our goals and objectives with our teleneurology initiatives.”

Yulun Wang, Chairman & CEO, InTouch Health said, “We are honored to partner with the Bon Secours Health System to bring greater access to quality care at lower costs into the communities they serve.  InTouch Health’s enterprise-wide Telehealth Network, in combination with high-quality remote physician services, can touch more of Virginia’s population through Bon Secours’ extensive network of hospitals and ultimately into ambulatory care facilities, clinics, long term care and patients’ homes.”

AcuteCare Telemedicine continues to expand its geographic imprint in telestroke care, and is very excited for the opportunity to drive impact for Bon Secours as they continue to enhance their telestroke network. “The advancements in teleneurology not only allow us to access more patients in need of our specialized care, but also improves patient outcomes overall,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, COO, AcuteCare Telemedicine. “The success of any program hinges on a seamless execution from door to needle. This collaboration is sure to have a significant impact on the patients and communities it serves.”

For more information on AcuteCare Telemedicine, visit www.acutecaretelemed.com.

 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine 

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health System

Bon Secours Virginia provides good help to thousands of Virginians through a network of hospitals, primary and specialty care practices, ambulatory care sites and continuing care facilities across the Commonwealth. The not-for-profit health system employs more than 12,500 people, including nearly 800 providers as part of the Bon Secours Medical Group.

The fourth largest and only faith-based health system in Virginia, Bon Secours Virginia offers a full range of services including cardiac, women’s, children’s, orthopaedics, oncology, neurosciences and surgery at eight award-winning hospitals.

– Bon Secours Richmond is St. Mary’s Hospital, Memorial Regional Medical Center, Richmond Community Hospital, Rappahannock General Hospital and St. Francis Medical Center.

– Bon Secours Hampton Roads is Maryview Medical Center, DePaul Medical Center and Mary Immaculate Hospital. 

About Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation

The Bon Secours Virginia Health Care Foundation raises charitable funds to help Bon Secours Virginia Health System address the community’s growing health care needs with compassion and excellence. Through charitable support, we are dedicated to helping create healthy communities, advancing clinical innovation and providing an extraordinary experience of care. For more information on giving, visit www.bsvaf.org. 

About InTouch Health

InTouch Health provides technology-enabled services to healthcare organizations for the delivery of high quality virtual care, anytime, anywhere.  InTouch Health has helped more than 100 healthcare systems deploy telehealth programs across their enterprise, and into other sites of care, quickly and seamlessly using its industry-leading combination of professionals, processes and practices.  The InTouch Telehealth Network provides users unmatched ease of use and diagnostic capabilities, proven reliability, FDA and HIPPA compliance, secure access control, and clinical and technical reporting.