AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Atlanta Neurology and ACT Expanding Opportunities for Neurologists
October 5, 2015, 10:40 am
Filed under: News | Tags: , , , ,

Atlanta Neurology, a leading neurology practice, and AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services for hospitals seeking stroke and other urgent Neurological care, is offering a rare opportunity to join a well-established practice and also provide telemedicine.

Atlanta Neurology offers a competitive benefits package including health, 401(k), savings, and pension, profit sharing plan, and flexible schedules. The Atlanta-based position extends growth opportunities in the booming healthcare, business, and cultural capital of the Southeast. Metro Atlanta offers a mild 4-season climate, easy access to mountains and beaches, excellent schools, exceptional restaurants, and abundant entertainment options.

Atlanta Neurology is looking for a neurologist who is passionate about helping people by leveraging expertise in general neurology, stroke diagnostics, and general management. Natural leadership in emergency telemedicine, office, and hospital care is also important.

Board certification in Neurology and Vascular Neurology required. Experience using botulinum toxin in headache treatment and other conditions a plus. Atlanta Neurology is an equal opportunity employer. Recent fellows encouraged to apply.

Please send CV with cover letter to admin@acutecaretelemed.com.

 

About Atlanta Neurology

Established in 1970, Atlanta Neurology continues to grow in an increasingly competitive environment. Not resting on the laurels of its team of exceptionally rated neurologists (Atlanta Magazine and Top Docs ratings 12 years running), Atlanta Neurology recognized the need for remote stroke and urgent neurology care in underserved markets when telemedicine was in its infancy. Now both a leader in clinical practice–affiliated with Northside Hospital and Emory St. Joseph’s–and a nationally recognized pacesetter in teleneurology, Atlanta Neurology and ACT are a formidable partnership.

 

About AcuteCare Telemedicine

 Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.



Eagle Scout, AcuteCare CEO Dr. Matthews Gwynn Does His Best To Help Others

Being a good scout has carried Dr. Matthews W. Gwynn through life, to the post of chief executive officer of AcuteCare Telemedicine, and consistently as one of America’s Top Doctors, according to U.S. News and World Report.

An Eagle Scout’s life lessons are a solid foundation for Dr. Gwynn, now 55, as he strives, on his honor, to do his best to help others. “It teaches you to do the right thing if you take it seriously,” he says of Scouting’s influence.  “In my blood I always try to do the right thing. I believe there is something to be said for society that, if you simply follow the Scout law and motto and think like that, it sounds hokey, really hokey, but the world is a better place.”

Dr. Gwynn was born in Baltimore, Md., then moved around in his early years, to Cincinnati, Ohio, Raleigh, N.C., and Reston, Va.

With his father’s encouragement, he grew into the idea of becoming a doctor. As a chemistry major with a liberal arts education, it was his love of science and problem solving, plus his maternal grandmother, that cleared the path for Dr. Gwynn’s career. In his teenage years, he helped take care of his grandmother after she’d suffered a stroke. “I came to understand the frailties of people,” he remembers. “I realized I could make a living at it and also help people get better.”

He is a graduate of the College of William and Mary and the University of Virginia Medical School. He completed an Internal Medicine residency at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and then returned to the University of Virginia for his Neurology residency. He is also a partner in Atlanta Neurology.

The challenges and riddles of Neurology are what eventually drew Dr. Gwynn in. “I loved the fact that it was a puzzle and the diseases were highly interesting and very challenging,” he says. “Not particularly easy and not everybody could do it. It required a very formal thought process to come to the right answer.” He says he was discouraged at first, “that there was nothing to do for people” he adds. “It was the old saying ‘diagnose and adios’ in neurology.” So he went into general medicine residency to find something to help people get better. But he changed his mind and realized he was fascinated by Neurology, just as the field was developing quickly.

Dr. Gwynn realized that telemedicine was a rising frontier in the field of Neurology. “The current economics in medicine is unfavorable for many neurologists to stay in hospitals. Almost all liability comes from there, and it is very disruptive to your primary income source, which is your private practice,” he says.  This exodus creates a real void. “Telemedicine is not a fad. It’s a demand that is growing,” the chief of Neurology at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta adds. “We are trying to use this opportunity to fill the gap.”

The CEO sees the professionals at AcuteCare Telemedicine as “competent, punctual and engaging.” He says they embody the “Three A’s of Medicine”: ability; availability; and affability. “They are competent and have a wide breadth of clinical neurology experience and knowledge and are leaders in their field,” Dr. Gwynn adds. “They are engaged. We are people-people. We provide expert advice and with patients we are able to empathize and help them really well; better than most of our colleagues.”

Dr. Gwynn is also director and founder of the Stroke Center of Northside Hospital and recent chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine. He says the ability to connect with people is crucial in telemedicine. “It’s amazing how well that works,” he says. “Within five seconds I can gain the trust of the patient as much as if I were in the room by greeting them with a smiling face and respect.

We all find commonality very quickly with our patients,” the husband of 27 years and father of two says assuringly. “A lot of people are very frightened when they have neurological symptoms, because it is so foreign to them. It’s an enigma. So we’re there to try to put them at ease and figure out how to help them.”

Dr. Gwynn has also become a national expert leader in using botulinum toxin for medical treatment of chronic migraine, movement disorders, spasticity, and other disorders, and he trains other physicians to use it in their own practices.

The doctor enjoys a round of golf in what little spare time he gets. He also likes to cycle and backpack and enjoys classical music.

The Eagle Scout in a white coat gets his inspiration within each new day. “I love that every day is different and that I am going to see interesting people,” Dr. Gwynn says. “That people are going to come to me asking for my advice and wanting me to help them and make them better. I can’t help everybody but I can listen to everybody and ameliorate their suffering.”

He is also fond of the direction AcuteCare Telemedicine is taking. “By the end of next month we’re going to be in six states and many different ERs,” Dr. Gwynn says, “and I can reach anyone from anywhere. I can even have an influence on someone’s care 2,000 miles away in Arizona. That’s very cool.”



New Rules for Telemedicine Providers in Georgia

The Georgia Composite Medical Board (GCMB) has approved new rules (360-3-.07) for healthcare providers who are practicing telemedicine in the state.

The new rules require doctors to be licensed in the state of Georgia and, in most cases, to have either seen the patient in person or have a referral from another physician, PA or APRN who has seen the patient in person prior to providing the electronic service. The ‘‘in person’’ rule allows exceptions in cases where a patient has been referred by certain types of providers and agencies, such as public school nurses, a community mental health center, the Department of Family and Children’s Services or law enforcement. The rule also includes a broad exception to the in-person encounter requirement if the care provider ‘‘is able to examine the patient using technology and peripherals that are equal or superior to an examination done personally by a provider within that provider’s standard of care.’’

The exceptions were a departure from previous rules that were under consideration by the GCMB. As reported in the Bloomberg BNA, the original provisions offered little in the way of exceptions to the in-person rule but language was altered on the advice of the Medical Association of Georgia (MAG) and other groups. Dr. Matthews Gwynn, an Atlanta area neurologist and board secretary for MAG, told Bloomberg BNA, ‘‘As a neurologist providing care for stroke patients in emergency situations, I’ve never seen these patients before, so I said you have to have a mechanism to allow us to see these patients de novo. This version of the rules does that.’’

The new rules were also prompted, in part, as a response to a growing abuse of online prescription pain medications by unscrupulous companies selling prescriptions on demand. Georgia instituted the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program in 2013 which allows pharmacists to check to see whether patients are getting prescriptions from more than one doctor or using several pharmacies. Georgia was the second to last state to implement a system to monitor and curb what has become a significant problem all across the country. The new GCMB telemedicine rules specifically exclude the prescription and distribution of controlled substances for the treatment of pain or chronic pain by electronic means.

The GCMB rule requiring telemedicine providers to have a Georgia state license is typical of other states’ requirements. The individual state license rule is often seen as a significant barrier to the accelerated expansion of telemedicine nationwide. Consumer groups traditionally advocate for more open telemedicine policies as a way to improve access to health care for residents of rural areas across the country and in Georgia, where doctors, particularly specialists, are scarce.



AcuteCare Telemedicine Leading Acute Care Telemedicine

The effort to provide high-quality healthcare solutions to every patient, regardless of geographic location, while reducing delivery costs is at the foundation of industry leaders efforts to revolutionize the traditional healthcare delivery model. Telemedicine is becoming the cornerstone of the solutions. Advances in telecommunication technologies is providing increased opportunities to decrease complications for patients in areas of high acuity like the critical care unit, as well as provide assistance in time-sensitive treatment decisions for emergencies such as stroke care.

InTouch Health® is the leader in acute care remote presence telemedicine. The company through its network of clinical care providers delivers innovative healthcare solutions that extend a doctor’s ability to manage patient care remotely, thereby removing critical time and distance barriers. The InTouch Telemedicine System allows physicians and other healthcare providers to conduct highly reliable, real-time, remote consultations.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the largest practiced based provider of acute stroke and neurological care is now linked as a preferred provider with InTouch Health. Acute care telemedicine is an approach to urgent healthcare delivery in which specialists are focused on providing comprehensive, end-to-end remote presence clinical services, enabling a remote clinician to be interactively present in the patient environment and gather pertinent medical information through examination and data access to form a medical decision and care plan. With their remote expertise available at a moment’s notice, ACT is able to increase the likelihood that patients will obtain necessary stroke care within the critical “golden hour” following stroke recognition. The importance of using acute care telemedicine in the advancement of emergency healthcare is supported by the efforts of InTouch Health.

The ACT team of expert Neurologists is being recognized for setting new standards for excellence in Telestroke and urgent Teleneurology care. As clinical partners with hospital based and emergency physicians, they are positioned to successfully deliver remote, live and interactive Telestroke and other Teleneurology solutions that deliver the highest quality, affordable services and superior clinical outcomes for hospitals all around the world.



Expanding tPA Stroke Treatment Through Telestroke Delivery Model

For years, the mantra of neurologists treating stroke victims has been “time equals brain.” That’s because getting a patient to the emergency room quickly to receive a drug that dissolves the stroke-causing blood clot can make a significant difference in how much brain tissue is saved or lost. Established research has demonstrated that administering a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) intravenously up to 4.5 hours, after the onset of a stroke, benefits patients with moderate to severe acute ischemic stroke. An ischemic stroke occurs as a result of an obstruction within a blood vessel supplying blood to the brain and it accounts for 87 percent of all stroke cases.

While the use of tPA significantly improves a patients recovery from stroke its administration requires the availability of neurologic expertise within this narrow window of time.  Specialized stroke care at large academic medical facilities is very effective in providing stroke care but access to these centers is limited to patients living in rural areas of the country.  Practiced-based telestroke services, staffed primarily by general neurologist, offer a streamlined organization that facilitates the dissemination of this vital emergency treatment but a comparative analysis of the data between the two delivery systems is a critical.

“Expanding Access to Intravenous Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator with a Practiced-based Telestroke System” was recently published by the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.  The study was prepared by 4 practiced-based neurologists at AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), an Atlanta-based company that’s billed as the largest practice-based provider of teleneurology in the southeast.  Summary findings included data gathered over a two year period at 7 hospitals on 202 emergency telemedicine consultations and treatment of 54 telestroke patients with IV tPA.  Patient demographics and outcome measures were not significantly different for patients treated by practiced–based or academic providers with the exception of lower age and shorter stay duration of the practiced-based treatment group.

The results indicate that emergency stroke care provided by the two delivery models can achieve similar patient outcomes and that a practiced-based telestroke system can expand the availability of IV tPA treatment with clinical outcomes no different from previously published studies.

“Meeting the requirement of providing rapid neurology care to all of the nation’s emergency rooms will necessitate a concerted effort of academic and practiced-based stroke systems”, said Dr. Keith A Sanders, ACT.  The technological, organizational and financial hurdles which currently limit telestroke use and expansion will likely be resolved as the benefits of telemedicine become more evident with its expanded use.

For more study details and the full article, contact info@acutecaretelemed.com



Breaking the Rules

The Georgia Composite Medical Board recently voted against implementing a rule requiring that any patient must be seen by a physician before receiving care from nurses or PAs via telemedicine technologies, a requirement that realistically cannot be met in most non-telemedicine encounters. It was a small but important victory for practitioners and patients alike.

Prior to being voted down, the proposed rule was drawing widespread criticism from proponents of telemedicine, and for good reason. The motivation for suggesting the rule was to ensure that all mid-level providers caring for patients via telemedicine were being properly supervised by doctors who are more familiar with the technologies. Certainly, taking steps to guarantee the quality of care and safety of patients, especially when dealing with new tools and methods, is of utmost importance to everyone involved in the care process. However, the rule would have been damaging to the improved access to care that is a hallmark of telemedicine, placing an additional an unnecessary step between patients who need immediate attention and the care they require.

With the increasing shortage of physicians, not just in Georgia, but nationwide, telemedicine has opened avenues for the delivery of quality care to individuals living in rural and underserved locales where providers simply are not available. As more practitioners educate themselves on the virtues of telehealth, the reach of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals will extend further than ever before.

Telemedicine will ultimately enter our vernacular and be known simply as ‘medicine.’ In the meantime, as our technology and methodology continue to evolve, we must be careful to steer clear of implementing laws such as the redundant rule proposed in Georgia to avoid setting precedents that will preclude telemedicine from playing its role in assisting our healthcare system reach new heights.



Opening the Dialogue to Better Care

Amidst much confusion and debate about plotting the best course towards achieving the so-called ‘triple-aim’ of increasing quality, improving patient satisfaction, and reducing costs, the healthcare community is struggling with communications amongst payers, vendors, and providers. Creating initiatives that encourage the development of more efficient, more sustainable healthcare requires the participation of all these entities in an ongoing conversation.

For physicians, making the ecosystem more intelligent is not exactly a simple proposition. Focused on delivering care, doctors typically do not have affinities for nor access to the kinds of information readily available to payers and vendors, such as performance metrics, analytics, and risk management considerations. Fostering an environment in which this data and knowledge can be openly shared is a pivotal step in helping doctors operate smarter.

As eHealth and the growth of telemedicine begin to significantly impact the delivery of care, the healthcare industry must address questions as to how physicians can better access these insights and be stimulated to embrace best practices, as well as how plan members can be similarly empowered to make better decisions. The answers come in the form of more open dialogue. Each party needs to share a similar, if not identical perspective on what constitutes quality to effectively collaborate.

With an ever-expanding arsenal of tools and knowledge at their disposal, physicians must call upon available resources in the form of industry partners to take advantage of this opportunity. The result will be a more intelligent system that benefits the entire network.