AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Telemedicine Achieves Its Potential for Parkinson’s Patients

Ask any patient suffering from chronic disease and they often will tell a story of isolation, uncertainty and frustration over the debilitating effects of their disease. Many times the focus of their complaints is not being afforded easy access to specialized care and consultation with caregivers. While significant inroads have been made in the treatment options for chronic maladies like Diabetes and Parkinson’s disease, gaining routine, daily access to those ground breaking discoveries is out of the reach of many sufferers.

Researchers are looking at how modern communication technology, coupled with the latest techniques in treating Parkinson disease, can revolutionize the quality of care for sufferers of the chronic neurological disorder. “We are looking at quality of life, quality of care and reducing the burden on healthcare providers”, says Dr. Ray Dorsey, co-director of the Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics at the University of Rochester (N.Y.) Medical Center. “Imagine if you thought there was a possibility you had Parkinson’s disease, but you lived 100 miles or more from the nearest medical center with a qualified neurologist. You’re faced with at least a couple of hours of driving, of navigating an unfamiliar urban environment, of parking and walking—and that’s assuming you’re able to find a neurologist within driving distance to begin with. Now think about how easy it is to buy a book or a pair of shoes online. The two should not be so different.”

Preliminary results of the Connect.Parkinson project, the nation’s first randomized clinical trial of remote treatment of Parkinson’s disease, indicate the benefits of virtual treatment for patients and caregivers alike. A recent report on the initial results of the 18-state, Connect.Parkinson project reported that 95 percent of Parkinson’s patients completing telehealth visits have experienced an increased proportion of the time with a healthcare professional of 89 percent; up from 25 percent for those opting for traditional in-person encounters.

The National Parkinson Foundation is committed to supporting efforts to demonstrate how telemedicine can enhance the delivery of care to people with Parkinson’s. Studies are indicating that telemedicine care, often delivered in the patients home, is just as good as care received at a brick and motor medical center. The fact that diagnosing and monitoring the progression of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders is based almost entirely on visual observation makes Parkinson uniquely suited for virtual care technologies. Christopher Goetz, MD, a leading expert on movement disorders and director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center at Rush University Medical Center says, “Ninety-five percent of the information I gather is visual. Thus, with telemedicine visits where I can see and hear my patient right in front of me on the computer screen, there is no decline in the quality of information I gather.”

Rush is located in the state of Illinois which is among those states not yet mandating payers to provide payments for telemedical services. But according to Dr. Brian Patty, Rush’s chief medical information office and chairman of Rush’s Telemedicine Steering Committee, the Medical Center has several telemedicine pilot projects underway that can likely have significant impact on Parkinson patients.

In New York, researchers at The Rochester Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics, are developing and testing mobile apps that will help Parkinson’s patients track metrics such as dexterity, balance, gait, voice patterns and cognition, then send readings to researchers.

After decades of promises, telemedicine is delivering on its promise to increase access to quality, specialty care to improve patient outcomes.



Paying for the Promises of Telemedicine

Telemedicine is living up to its hype on revolutionizing the healthcare delivery model. With many of the most formidable barriers to increased expansion being overcome, virtual technology is quickly becoming a preferred method for patients when connecting with their care provider. New advances in hardware and software coupled with faster digital info structure, is driving more and more healthcare professionals to electronic communications. Patients are warming-up to using new devices to relay their blood pressure, heart rate and other vital signs to their doctors so they can manage chronic conditions in the comfort of their home.

Healthcare providers, payers and governmen supported healthcare programs are recognizing the potential cost savings of telemedicine technologies. However, payment policies for telehealth services, while expanding quickly, continue to be inconsistent and are discouraging the progress towards realizing the full potential of virtual healthcare. Providers are eager to embrace telehealth. A survey of more than 1,500 family physicians conducted for Anthem and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) found that “almost 90% of respondents would use telehealth to help treat their patients—if they were compensated for that care.” Richard Bakalar, MD, managing director at KPMG and a member of the firm’s Global Healthcare Center of Excellence says, “Healthcare providers need to figure out how to become more efficient and the technology behind telemedicine allows caregivers to connect with patients remotely, efficiently and effectively.”

Currently payments for telehealth services are as far flung as the 50 states landscape. New rules for Medicaid managed care and MACRA are becoming telehealth-friendly, but Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements are spotty, with Medicaid payment varying greatly from state to state. Today, 48 states and the District of Columbia provide some form of Medicaid payment for telehealth services, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Commercial insurers seem to be embracing telehealth but consistency of payment policy remains elusive. In just over half of the states and the District of Columbia, private insurers are answering the call of parity laws that require them to pay for telehealth services. Payment parity is important for providers because it protects them against arbitrary cuts in reimbursement for telehealth services as compared to services provided in-person.

While expansion of virtual technology continues to progress at a steady pace, solutions to resolving remaining barriers like payment for services, multistate licensing, credentialing, and regulation are evolving at a deliberate pace.



Is That The Sound Of Ice Breaking?

Until recently, the state of Arkansas was ranked last among all states in a recent report by the American Telemedicine Association on telemedicine practice standards. Like many other states, Arkansas’s treatment of healthcare via telecommunication technologies included restrictions forbidding caregivers the opportunity to treat a patient remotely without first establishing a face to face relationship. While other regulations purposefully and effectively deal with commonly acceptable policies that hold virtual healthcare treatment to the same standards of care as traditional in-person encounters; control the prescription of certain drugs via telemedicine; require the responsible handling of medical recording; and doctor/patient transparency, the restrictions on non-pre service face to face encounters and the insistence on individual state licensing of physicians is arguably the two regulations which proponents of telemedicine feel are hindering the wider adoption of telemedical services across the country.

Recently issued proposed amendments to its existing regulations have been approved by the State Legislature. Arkansas Code 17-80-117, will allow a doctor to establish a valid relationship with a patient without the need for an in-person exam, if the doctor “performs a face to face examination using real time audio and visual telemedicine technology that provides information at least equal to such information as would have been obtained by an in-person examination.” The rule also requires the doctor to establish a face to face follow-up visit when and if it is medically necessary.

The sound one hears from this action may just be the noise regulatory ice makes when it is breaking under the pressure of consumer demand and the application technological common sense. While the proposed changes do nothing to alleviate the cost and inconvenience of individual state physicians licensing requirements, the removal of the face-to-face, pre-telemedicine service requirement could open up the virtual care landscape in states where the face-to-face regulation still exists.

The Arkansas Board held a public hearing involving the proposed amendment to Regulation 2.8 and new Regulation 38 in June and encouraged telemedicine companies and healthcare providers looking to offer telemedicine services in Arkansas to review the proposed regulations and consider submitting comments.

Adoption of the proposed changes to Arkansas rules governing telehealth services may be seen as a water-shed action for healthcare professionals who believe consumers will benefit from both increased healthcare access and reduced cost when telemedicine is permitted to more freely expand across state lines.



Telemedical Technology: Creating a Healthcare World without Barriers

As with many other high tech gadgetry, revolutionary processes and scientific inventions telemedicine has its roots in the NASA space program. For those early adopters of telemedicine, the efficacy of the doctor/patient consultation and the ability to improve patient outcomes were on the top of the list for barriers to entry. Many thought that patients would be hesitant to trade personal face-to-face visits with their doctor for a consultation through a virtual robot. But as early adopters used the technology to bring specialized care to remote and distant rural areas, patients soon realized the convenience and cost savings of not having to travel long distances to receive the latest in specialized healthcare, and soon embraced the new experience in connecting with a doctor.

The process is now considered to be an ideal use of technology to monitor and connect healthcare professionals with patients over long distances. With the introduction and increasing popularity of wearable technology, the existing digital info-structure in many rural areas of the country limited the expansion of telehealth. With the recent introduction of ConnectAll, a new federal initiative aimed at building broadband parity across America, is expected to provide nearly 20 million more Americans with access to telemedicine. “The expansion of affordable Broadband will further solidify the rapidly growing telemedicine sector, which is transforming the healthcare paradigm,” said Jonathan Linkous, CEO, American Telemedicine Association (ATA). “This initiative helps to deliver the promise of more cost-effective healthcare delivery models, and promotes the expansion of telehealth services for all.”

With Medicare, Medicaid, and private health insurance carriers continually expanding the number of virtual services approved for reimbursement, a once formidable obstruction is disappearing all across the country and the world. A growing number of healthcare providers are now expanding their reach. “This is a world without boundaries, and that’s what we’re seeing,” said Andrew Watson, MD, chief medical information officer for University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s (UPMC’s) International and Commercial Services Division, “The advent of telemedicine in a world without boundaries is no different than using Facebook or Skype around the world. We’re just seeing this technology impact medicine.”

But not all of the walls to expansion have been breached. Much remains to be done to remove existing impediments such as state by state licensing and credentialing requirements. The established healthcare regulatory system with its myriad of governing bodies, Boards, and legislatures continues to be a formidable foe when it comes to interjecting new technology into the traditional face-to-face experience between the healthcare provider and patient. “In-person visits will likely remain the mainstay for local care for those fortunate enough to be around many physicians, but when minutes count in emergencies experts can step in and make the decisions that will determine a lifetime of health instead of a lifetime of disability. Telemedicine isn’t a fad but rather a disruptive innovation that flows naturally out of technological advances and has already contributed immensely to our society’s health. It’s a perfect fit for our shrinking resources,” says Matthews W. Gwynn, M.D., Partner, ACT.

ACT has been on the forefront of the use of telecommunication technology for years, remotely delivering live and interactive telestroke and other teleneurology solutions anytime, anywhere to hospitals and emergency medical centers throughout the Southeast. Progress in reforming the massive healthcare regulatory system is occurring as dedicated industry leaders tackle the challenges of integrating advanced remote medical technologies into the existing mainstream healthcare delivery model.



ACT Expands to Meet the Increasing Demands for Technology-Based Care

ResearchMoz.us recently published the results of new market research study titled ‘Telehealth and Telemedicine Market in HealthCare Industry 2015-2020’ which projects the global telemedicine market to grow 18.5 (CAGR) percent through 2019. It is clear that the healthcare industry is experiencing considerable growth in the use of digital technologies across a wide range of healthcare specialties such as telehealth, telestroke, wireless health monitoring, wearable health devices, and EMR.

One of the earliest adopters of telemedicine continues to advance in popularity with hospitals who seek around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care. As the demand for Neurologists increases, there is a growing shortage of experienced physicians available to provide continuous coverage at many facilities throughout the United States. AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), the leading practice-based provider of telemedicine services located in Atlanta, GA was founded in 2009 to help hospitals overcome medical staff obstacles, ER diversion and help improve patient outcomes for stroke and other Neurological conditions. Since the fourth quarter of 2015, ACT has added numerous client hospitals to their expanding network and is responding to the increased demand for these services by adding qualified neurologists to their team.

“We are dedicated to preserving and strengthening our reputation as leaders in the field of telestroke care and continue to be fully committed to serve the needs of both our patients and client hospitals in a manner that is personal and highly professional,” says James M. Kiely, ACT Partner.

ACT is experiencing an impressive performance by demonstrating its values of integrity, transparency, accountability, collaboration and expertise. Matthews W. Gwynn, CEO, and ACT Partner comments, “We’ve set the standard of care for teleneurology and acute stroke care. We also believe in the importance of remaining technology agnostic and agile, permitting our client hospitals and enterprise-level systems to select the specific technology that best fits the needs of their respective facilities.”

The growing firm is also focused on results, continuously measuring performance across all of the healthcare organizations it serves to identify how to improve the process so as to positively impact patient outcomes. “We are one of the only telestroke providers publishing data centered on the success of our program,” says Lisa H. Johnston, ACT Partner. “We’re proud of setting a standard for other providers to follow.” The study, titled “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals”, was published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases and authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS. The results indicate that a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network.

“ACT has developed a model of telestroke care that many of our competitors aren’t able to replicate,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “Our results prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable. As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care.”



The Importance of Measuring Performance

Telestroke, the use of communication technology to remotely treat victims of acute stroke, continues to grow and has entered the mainstream of care in an ever evolving and increasingly disruptive healthcare delivery model. Like all medical innovations, telestroke must demonstrate successful outcomes to achieve sustained growth and acceptance. Merely asserting that telemedicine is faster, employs the latest technology, or promotes a better use of limited re-sources is laudable but insufficient.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), a leading practice-based provider of Telemedicine services for hospitals seeking around-the-clock stroke and other urgent Neurological care, understands the importance of evaluating and documenting telestroke performance. In their recently published study “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” the authors reveal that a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency.

“Success in our business isn’t just about adding new healthcare organizations to our client portfolio,’ says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, co-author and ACT partner. “As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care and improving patient outcomes. This study is representative of our ongoing commitment to serve as a leader in telestroke care, establishing a standard of care and a model that supports the positive growth of telestroke programs across the country.”

As virtual health initiatives continue to move forward, new and valuable trends and telehealth technology solutions will continue to emerge. Traditional methods of delivering medical care will be challenged and disrupted at medical facilities, physicians’ offices and hospitals. Dr. Keith Sanders, ACT Partner and co-author comments, “It is critical to prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable.”

For more information on how AcuteCare Telemedicine can assist you with acute stroke care, contact us!



AcuteCare Telemedicine Team of Neurological Specialists Publish New Study

A new study published by the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases indicates a practice-based telemedicine system can produce meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network. “Improving Telestroke Treatment Times in an Expanding Network of Hospitals” is authored by Keith A. Sanders, MD, James M. Kiely, MD, PhD, Matthews W. Gwynn, MD, Lisa H. Johnston, MD and Rahul Patel, BS.

AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT) has remained committed to working with healthcare organizations to establish telestroke programs that not only improve access to specialty care but also significantly improve patient outcomes,” comments Dr. Keith Sanders, Partner, ACT. “It is critical to prove that our business is able to create telestroke programs that are not only effective but sustainable.”

As stated in the background for this study, telestroke must demonstrate successful outcomes to achieve sustained growth and acceptance. Asserting that telemedicine is faster, employs the latest technology, or promotes a better use of limited re-sources is laudable but insufficient. An analysis of stroke treatment within a telemedicine network in 2013 showed that tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) could be safely and reliably administered within a practice-based model of telestroke care. Since then, hospital volume and tPA administration within this network have tripled. We hypothesize that a practice-based model of telestroke can maintain positive outcomes in the face of rapid growth. As a result, the study demonstrates meaningful improvement in markers of telestroke efficiency in the face of rapid growth of a telestroke network.

“Success in our business isn’t just about adding new healthcare organizations to our client portfolio,’ says Dr. Matthews Gwynn, Partner, ACT. “As clinicians, we measure our success on consistently providing the highest level of stroke care and improving patient outcomes.  This study is representative of our ongoing commitment to serve as a leader in telestroke care, establishing a standard of care and a model that supports the positive growth of telestroke programs across the country.”

Download the full article here.

 About AcuteCare Telemedicine

Founded in 2009, AcuteCare Telemedicine is a limited liability corporation advancing the opportunity for healthcare institutions to gain access to highly-respected, expert neurologists and telemedicine technologies. AcuteCare offers a range of services including first-rate neurological emergency response care with around-the-clock support and hospital accreditation education. AcuteCare primarily provides remote emergency neurology consultation which fills staffing needs and reduces the costs associated with 24/7 neurologist availability. As a result, healthcare institutions provide full service emergency neurology care and can earn Joint Commission Certification as a Primary Stroke Center.