AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


Leading Centers Aiming to Revolutionize Stroke Research

Georgia StrokeNet will be one of 25 U.S. regional coordinating centers to take aim at revolutionizing stroke research under a program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Georgia StrokeNet is the only regional coordinating center in Georgia that is participating in the project that is funded by a five-year, $2 million grant.

Those taking part in the collaboration include: Emory University’s School of Medicine, Grady Memorial Hospital’s Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center and other local partners. Emory neurology professor and Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center Director Dr. Michael Frankel will serve as Georgia StrokeNet’s principal investigator: Dr. Frankel says, “The new StrokeNet will be a conduit for clinical trials for patients to participate in, so we can answer those key questions about what is the best way to prevent a stroke, what the right blood pressure to try to prevent a stroke, what is the right treatment for a patient who has an acute stroke.”

Grady Hospital’s Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center has earned a top designation for stroke care by an independent accrediting agency for health care organizations. The Center has been designated an Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center by the Joint Commission and is one of 50 U.S. stroke centers who have received the designation since it began. Emory University and Georgia Regents Medical Center in Augusta are the other two Georgia centers to receive the designation.

Dr. Keith A. Sanders, Director and Founder of the Stroke Center of St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta, and partner in Atlanta Neurology, P.C., is looking forward to contributing to the stroke research at Georgia StrokeNet.  “The research is important because strokes and stroke-related deaths are prevalent in Georgia and the Southeast. It is hoped that this research will lead to more treatment options to reduce disability from stroke, commented Dr. Sanders.”



Building Better Policy

Over the past several years, studies such as those conducted by the CDC and the National Institute of Health have constantly shown great disparity in levels of healthcare access across America. Particularly for poorer and rural areas, a lack of proper access has historically been extremely costly both in terms of human life and a greater economic impact. Policy makers, government officials, and leaders of health care organizations have recognized this divide, and are focused on identifying and eliminating barriers to patient access to provide a better, more uniform standard of effective healthcare across the country.

Thanks largely to leaps in technology and growing infrastructure, telemedicine is emerging as a highly effective solution with the potential to shape the future landscape of healthcare in America. The innovative, modern solutions offered by the growing telemedicine field combat the logistical challenges of the current state of healthcare, while having been proven to be more cost effective. Now, legislators are finally beginning to see the light.

On a state level, governments that have passed new telehealth legislation have seen positive results across the board. Powerful new applications and techniques have helped simplify and streamline remote patient consultation and monitoring, delivering better care with less economic impact with patient satisfaction rates nearing 100%. A dozen states, including Georgia, are leading the way on acknowledging telemedicine as an effective and efficient solution. So far in 2012, Maryland and Vermont have become the latest states to require private insurance companies to pay for telemedicine services.

The adoption of telemedicine marks a revolution in healthcare that carries great possibility for lasting impact. Creating a legislative environment in which telemedicine can flourish must continue to become a priority in a nation interested in reducing costs and saving lives.