AcuteCare Telemedicine Blog


AcuteCare Telemedicine in 2013: Cutting Edge Neurological Care, Anywhere

Following a third consecutive year of growth in 2012, AcuteCare Telemedicine (ACT), an Atlanta-based partnership of 4 board-certified neurologists, is expanding its efforts to become the leading provider expert neurological care to rural and underserved areas throughout the Southeastern United States via cutting edge telemedicine technology.

Telemedicine, once regarded as an exciting new frontier, has now been fully realized as a part of the mainstream lexicon of medicine as we enter 2013. For a large number of hospital systems, telemedicine programs are now becoming a mandate as the nation faces a growing shortage of specialized physicians.

ACT has established itself as an innovator on the forefront of the industry, taking a unique approach to telemedicine by leveraging new technologies and techniques to enable personal neurology consultation when doctor and patient are in different locations. ACT offers a broad range of customizable services including 24/7 emergency neurological consultation and support programs for facilities seeking Joint Commission accreditation as a Primary Stroke Center, but primarily specializes in telestroke: the application of telemedicine to the treatment of the acute stroke patient. With the help of ACT’s powerful and personalized services, patients throughout the ‘Stroke Belt’ states of the Southeast have drastically improved access to the care they deserve, and medical facilities increase efficiency while reducing the costs associated with maintaining a traditional emergency neurology staff.

Whereas many hospitals with existing neurology departments simply do not have the resources to maintain around-the-clock clinician capacity, ACT has managed to successfully disrupt the trend and bring patient and physician together, regardless of geographical boundaries. Achieving this goal requires a certain level of investment in technology and trust in the people behind it. ACT is truly technology-agnostic.  This agility affords healthcare organizations with the ability to select the platform that meets budgetary and organizational parameters.

ACT provides access to the best 24X7 acute neurological care. Contact Michael Woodcock to hear how teleneurology can impact your business and patients in 2013.



Stroke Treatment Gets a Boost

Fifty years ago, the only advice medical textbooks gave physicians for someone suffering with a stroke was to put him to bed and keep him comfortable, hoping that with time, the brain would heal as best it could. For 30 years, promising techniques preceded disappointing trials. First, heparin was going to be the savior, and for most of the 70s and 80s, it almost served as a standard, but better studies eventually showed that the treatment was not just worthless, but in reality dangerous, causing more brain hemorrhages than no treatment at all. Later, drugs that were intended to clear out “free radicals” were going to save the ischemic penumbra, part of viable brain tissue around a central core of dead cells, but all studies showed that either the medication didn’t get to the target, didn’t work, or could even be toxic to the brain.

In the mid 90s, tissue plasminogen activator (TPA), long used for heart attack victims to break up the clots inside arteries of the heart, was shown to be effective in doing the same in arteries of the brain. For the first time, physicians had something to offer patients that actually made a difference. About a third of patients who received TPA had better three month outcomes than those that did not. This success rate was quite good, but patients with severe strokes still did not respond as well because, in most cases, thrombi in the large arteries were not effectively dissolved.

Only in the last few years have studies been done to consider the effectiveness of a thrombectomy, the process of physically pulling out a thrombus inside an artery in the brain or neck, The early devices available to physicians are fairly good at the task, but a substantial number of patients continue to suffer from residual blockages of the arteries following the procedure.

A report of clinical trials using two new types of thrombectomy devices, called Solitaire and Trevo Retriever, show both of these new devices as being up to five times more effective than their predecessors in opening up arteries. Advances this drastic are rare in medicine, but physicians should be optimistic about the potential for these instruments in improving outcomes. Provided that patients can have access to skilled practitioners in time, within eight hours or sooner, the treatment of stroke may be about to enter a dramatic new phase.

Stroke is the most serious disabling condition in adults, resulting in hundreds of thousands of permanent injuries and deaths every year. This decade may witness the greatest advances in the history of stroke treatment. There are still further trials to run, but with these exciting new prospects, the importance of stroke neurologists like the doctors of ACT being present in every emergency room, either in person or by remote presence, cannot be overstated.



Long Distance Learning

Along with other massive changes brought on by the increasing power and reach of the internet, the past decade has seen a drastic increase in the number of undergraduate and graduate degrees attained online. Today, more than 12,000 different “digital degrees” can be obtained from accredited U.S. universities, a figure that has grown by double digits annually for the last five years.

While the growth of the internet has enabled a plethora of such ‘distance learning’ opportunities for collegiate education, new technologies and practices in telemedicine are simultaneously reinventing the approach to professional education in hospitals and healthcare facilities around the world.

The educational aspects of telehealth programs demand the least effort and level of investment of any implementation of the discipline, but the benefits of adoption are immense, and can serve as the building blocks for increased engagement down the road.

Telemedicine actually allows hospitals to bring the education directly into the facility, offering professional training directly from the experts on the newest procedures and protocols, as well as serving as a 24/7 resource always available for consultation.  Bringing this type of program into a hospital not only helps administrators, physicians, nurses, and staff better perform their jobs and offer patients a better standard of care, but also creates champions of the telemedicine services, opening the door to a healthcare ecosystem that is far more responsive to innovation.

Introducing telemedicine to healthcare facilities through educational initiatives is also a great way to align the goals of the hospital and the provider to foster stronger relationships for the future. The facility wants to offer top quality care within the confines of a tightening budget, and the provider wants to help its client hospital save lives while reducing spending in the process to demonstrate its competitive advantage. The educational process is a great way to interface with the effective and efficient solutions that telehealth can offer. It is a major step towards a future where all hospitals have access to the resources they need to operate equally efficiently; a win for patient and provider alike.



Collaboration Across the Pond

Relations between the US and the UK are particularly amiable, arguably at an all time high, and moving towards modernity, our cultures have engaged in a ‘give and take’ from one another. However, when it comes to discussion of healthcare policy, our politicians and citizens are often quick to dismiss one another’s perspectives.

Despite the huge disparities in approach, each country’s current desires in regards to changing their healthcare situation are fairly equivalent. Both nations are working towards getting better value from healthcare expenditures, encouraging providers to focus on quality with better incentives, and controlling rising health care costs, regardless of the differences in who is paying.

Telemedicine offers both systems huge advantages in the pursuit of these goals, and the two can learn from one another. In the US, telemedicine has helped curb unnecessary and irresponsible healthcare spending, an important consideration for a nation currently obsessed with combating rising costs detrimental to its economy. Abroad, electronic patient care records are managed efficiently, falling in line with the expectations of the unified, government-controlled National Health Service (NHS) responsible for administrating healthcare.

It is important to keep in mind the great differences in context between the implementation of telemedicine in the United Kingdom and here at home. Of course, the NHS provides citizens with what we have dubbed as “Universal” health care, which is free to the patient at the point of service. In contrast to the Brits’ centrally governed and tax-funded system, care in the US is available through a multitude of competitive providers and is paid for by a patchwork of public and private insurers. The fact of the matter is, telemedicine works as a solution to a myriad of challenges, and both countries are discovering new solutions every day.

Healthcare officials in both countries envision telemedicine playing prominent roles in the future of their respective systems. Perhaps in the short term, this vision will be a common ground on which to open a mutually beneficial dialogue to address the unique challenges facing each nation.